Saturday, July 30, 2011

Remembering Our Sister Julia Maine

Memorial for Julia Irma (Nagy) Maine

Born in Crescent, OH. on May 7, 1930
Departed on Jul. 28, 2011 and resided in Weirton, WV.

Visitation: Saturday, Jul. 30, 2011
6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
&
Sunday, Jul. 31, 2011
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Service: Monday, Aug. 1, 2011
11:00 am
Cemetery: Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens

Following a hard fought battle with congestive heart failure, Julia Irma (Nagy) Maine, 81, of Weirton, went to be with the Lord on Thursday, July 28, 2011, at Weirton Medical Center. Born May 7, 1930, in Crescent, OH, she was a daughter of the late Paul Nagy Sr. and Julianna Kovach Nagy. She was preceded in death by her loving husband, John William Maine; brothers, Paul Jr., Ernest, and Franklin Joseph Nagy; sisters, Bertha Kanotz, and Margaret Albert.

With over 35 years of service as a registered nurse/Critical Care, Julia retired from Weirton Medical Center. She was proud of being one of the original nursing staff that opened The Weirton General Hospital, and Weirton Medical Center, as well as one of the area's first Life Flight nurses. As a member of the Cove Presbyterian Church, she served the congregation as a Sunday school teacher, a Deacon, and an Elder. For many years, Julia held office in the Weirton Community Radio Watch. Touching the lives of the community's youth, Julia was actively involved with her family in Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, the Loretta B. Millsop Council of Campfire Girls, and the Weir High Band, where she served as President and band nurse.

Julia is survived by her lovingly devoted children: Paul Lewis Maine and wife, Deana Maine of Weirton and John Michael Maine and wife, Florence Lynn Maine of Eustis, FL; her daughters, Judi L. VanHorn and Nancy L. Sciaraffa of Houston, TX and Charlene M.Sayre and husband Dennis A. Sayre of Chesapeake, WV, and three granddaughters, Lisa Renee. Sayre, Dana Nicole Sayre, and Jenna Jo Maine; brother Steve (Mary) Nagy Sr. of Belmont, OH, and sisters, Charlotte (Steve) Kovacs of Alledonia, OH, and Elizabeth Bodollo, North Lawrence, OH.

Friends and family will be received Saturday from 6-8PM, and Sunday 1-3 and 6-8PM at the Greco-Hertnick Funeral Home, 3219 Main Street, Weirton. Funeral services will be celebrated 11:00AM, Monday, August 1 at the funeral home. The Reverend Dr. Ed Rudiger will officiate. Interment will be in Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens Cemetery, Weirton.

In lieu of flowers, the family respectfully requests donations to Cove Presbyterian Church and the American Heart Association.

Friday, July 29, 2011

Announcements

The announcements as they appear in Sunday's bulletin are below:

OUR NURSERY FOR CHILDREN . . .
(infant thru five years) is open during Sunday School and the Worship Service, under the direction of Jenna Maine. We still need some volunteer help. If you can spare time to supervise the little ones please see Jenna after the service. We thank you in advance for caring for the future member of our Cove family.

DON’T FORGET SUNDAY SCHOOL . . .
we meet every Sunday morning at 9:45 a.m. Think about trying out one of our classes. We have a variety of classes to chose from to fit your needs.

WHEN WE BEGIN THE SERVICE. . .
our children carry red, orange and yellow streamers. This represents the coming of the Holy Spirit, filling the sanctuary as we prepare to worship. At the end of the service, they carry the streamers out, challenging us to carry the Spirit into the world.

JESUS TIME OFFERS THE YOUNGER CHILDREN . . .
of our congregation, between the ages of 3 and 11, the opportunity to worship in a special experience just for them. The children are dismissed to Jesus Time after a Special Time for Children.

WELCOME TO OUR CONGREGATION. . .
Jenna and her mother Tawnya Burket. We’re also happy to have with us Conrad Isaiah Criss, son of Michael & Sarah Criss and grandson of Roger and Patty Criss, who is receiving a special blessing this morning. The Criss’ are moving to Las Vegas where Michael has been commissioned a Crew Chief with The Thunderbirds.

PASTOR RUDIGER IS LEADING A CONFIRMATION CLASS . . .
for young people between the ages of 12 and 16, at 5:00 p.m.. If you're interested in learning more about the Christian faith and are considering announcing your faith in Jesus Christ, please plan to attend. At the end of the five weeks, you'll also have the chance to join our congregation. If you have any questions, please give us a call.

OUR VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL . . .
will run from August 1 through August 5, 6:30 p.m. till 8:00 p.m. Will have activities for young people from Preschool through high school. Contact the church office at 304-748-5980 to register your child.

THE BROWN BAG BIBLE STUDY WILL MEET . . .
next on Thursday, August 4 , at 12:30 p.m. We’ll finish our study of John, by looking at 2 John. Grab your lunch and join us as we study God’s word.

OUR ANNUAL CHURCH PICNIC. . .
is scheduled for Sunday, August 14 at Marland Heights Park. The worship service will begin at 11:00 a.m. Hot dogs, hamburgers, buns, fried chicken and beverages will be provided. Please bring a covered dish to share.

GREETERS NEEDED . . .
if you would like to serve as a greeter before a Sunday morning worship service, please contact Bonnie Nichols at 304-723-5134.

SUMMER CAMPS . . .
Beaver Creek and Camp Presmont are offering a variety of camps this year for children of all ages and interests. Experience nature, swimming, fishing, and making crafts, while growing in your faith. View the different types of camps and their dates by checking out the bulletin board located in the main hallway downstairs or contact the church office for more information. Scholarships are available to children wishing to experience summer camp.

WE ARE BLOGGING!
We now have six blogs that you can check out for information and on which you can leave comments. They're listed below:
• The Cove Community (www.thecovecommunity.blogspot.com) - This is for the whole church. I'll post sermons and announcements. I also invite y'all to send in material that you'd like to share with other members of the congregation. And please feel free to comment on anything you might read.
• Cove Kids (www.covekids.blogspot.com) - This is tailored for the preteen young people in our church. Again I'll post announcements. You're also invited to send in any writings, photographs and art work you'd like to post. And they don't have to all deal with the church. We also post artwork from Jesus Time.
• Glue (www.cove-glue.blogspot.com) - Our teens are running their own blog site; therefore, I have no idea what will be posted.
• Bible Talk (www.cove-bibletalk.blogspot.com) - We've established this blog to give pastors and lay people the chance to discuss Scripture. The weekly passages are from the Common Lectionary, and we're posting the pastor’s translation of the Greek text. We want you to read any or all of the passages and to leave any comment or ask any question that you feel is appropriate. Please include any research you've done. As we share our ideas and insights, we hope that we'll all come to a better and deeper understanding of the Bible. Each passage is linked to a website that offers some informative information.
• Let’s Talk About It (www.cove-talk.blogspot.com) - Through this site, we hope to encourage a conversation on a variety of topics. Since this blog is sponsored by a church, we expect most of the issues to involve the Christian faith. Still we don't want to limit ourselves or you. If you have a topic that you'd like us to discuss, include it as a comment to a previous issue. Please phrase it as a question and offer a summary of at least two positions. We'll add a new item to discuss every three weeks. We hope this challenges you to apply your faith to issues that are important to you.
• The Bible in a Year (www.cove-bibleinayear.blogspot.com/) - Each day, we'll post passages so that you can read the Bible in one year.

IT IS OFTEN DIFFICULT TO HEAR PRAYER REQUESTS . . .
on Sunday mornings. If you would like to have someone added to the prayer chain please drop a short note into the collection plate with their name and any other information you would like to share. You may also call the church office or e-mail the church with the information.

IF YOU LEAVE AN ITEM AT CHURCH . . .
for someone or for a specific function, please take a moment to write the information on the item. If there is no name on the item we will assume it is for the church in general.

IN THE HOSPITAL? HOMEBOUND? RECENT ILLNESS?. . .
if you are unable to attend services and would like to arrange for a visit from Rev. Ed Rudiger please contact the church office. Also if you would like to be included in our weekly bulletin mailings contact the church office.

WE CAN ALWAYS DO A BETTER JOB MINISTERING . . .
to the needs within this congregation, community and world. Please feel free to offer any suggestions as comments.

LOOSE CHANGE OFFERING . . .
Session has approved the Deacons collecting a “Loose Change Offering” that will be used to assist the Deacons with their utility assistance outreach program for Weirton residents or Cove Church members. We hope church members can help with the assistance program by donating some of their spare change. A container is placed in the Narthex each Sunday morning before church. The Deacons thank you for your continuing support of their projects.

VASES OF FLOWERS. . .
can be purchased for a service. The cost is $16.00 a vase. Silk flowers can be purchased for an additional cost. The flower calendar is located on the far wall in the church narthex or you can telephone the church office to place your order. After the service, the flowers will be placed in a plastic vase for you to take with you.

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS. . .
newsletters from old friends or articles about or by members of Cove Church, check out the bulletin board located in the hallway by the church offices. Past event pictures are also on display in that area.

WE’RE UPDATING OUR PRAYER AND DEVOTION LINE . . .
about four times a week. If you would like to call and hear a devotional, please call 304-748-7900.

SHOP ON LINE . . .
just use Good Search and Good Shop search engines to find what you are hunting for. List Cove Presbyterian Church as your charity and a percent of your purchase will come back to the church. It’s a simple way to raise money for the Cove Deacons while shopping for yourself!

ONGOING MISSION PROJECTS . . .
• Used Can Tabs are being collected for the Ronald McDonald House in Morgantown, West Virginia. Deposit your tabs in the container located in the main hallway downstairs. A recent thank you note from “The House” has been posted on the bulletin board.
• Campbell’s Labels are being collected by the Presbyterian Women and can be dropped off in the container located in the main hallway downstairs. These labels are being collected for the Weirton Christian Center.

Saying Good-Bye to Summer...Almost

Well, here we are, leaving the month of July, which means we're one step closer to saying good-bye to summer. And even though some of y'all are "sun lovers," for me, this hasn't been a pleasant time of year. I think the heat has been brutal, and when combined with the humidity, I feel like an uprooted plant. Summer 2011 can't end too soon for me.

But I recognize that some folks strongly disagree. And for y'all, it have included a little poem by Robert Louis Stevenson entitled "Summer Sun." I hope you enjoy.

Great is the sun, and wide he goes
Through empty heaven with repose;
And in the blue and glowing days
More thick than rain he showers his rays.


Though closer still the blinds we pull
To keep the shady parlour cool,
Yet he will find a chink or two
To slip his golden fingers through.


The dusty attic spider-clad
He, through the keyhole, maketh glad;
And through the broken edge of tiles
Into the laddered hay-loft smiles.


Meantime his golden face around
He bares to all the garden ground,
And sheds a warm and glittering look
Among the ivy's inmost nook.


Above the hills, along the blue,
Round the bright air with footing true,
To please the child, to paint the rose,
The gardener of the World, he goes.

Prayer Requests

The following are needs we'll lift to God on Sunday. If you have anyone to add, please let us know. Thanks.

Adults
Andrea Vincent
Andy DiRemigio
Betty
Anthony Calpo
Bill Churchman
Bill Moulds
Bob Saffle
Bonnie Kirtley
Byron McElroy
Charles Saffle
Charley
Christy Cybulski
Chuck Porter
Chum Robert
Connie Francis
Dave Adler
Dave Bever
David Kline
Denise Krofchek
Don Billham
Dr. James W. Valuska, Sr.
Greta Billham
Jennifer Dahlem
Joanna Tsiftis Xylas
John Brothers
John F. Roberts
Judy Dobbins
Loretta Hess
Marie Luckhardt
Mary & Jack Games
Mr. & Mrs. Mario Whitehead & Joyce
Nick Palavis
Pam Haller
Paul Buck
Pete Jones
Rachael
Rev. Alan Parr
Rev. Colleen Griffith
Rev. William Allen Jr.
Rhonda Bruich
Rick Swain
Rose Mader
Taylor Harris
Susan Ponville
Tom Lint
Tom Parsons
Vicki Williams
Virginia Welch
Yiayia

Kids
Audri King
Brandon Wares
Brody McUmor
Daisy Emmerick
Georgie Platt
Hunter Stafford
Jeffrey Konovich
Jonah Becker
Justus Loughry
Kya Schwertfeger
Michael Liptak
Shelby Kamarec
Zoe Purcell

Military
Chad Peppler
Jonathan Criss
Kendra Mader
Michael Criss
Stephen Mader

Troops
Our troops all around the world need our prayers for strength, endurance, and safety.

Bereaved Family
The Losey Family
The Family of Julia Maine

Church Families
Paul, Deana & Jenna Maine
Hugh & Phyllis Manley

Local Church
Church of Christ, Colliers Way

Other Presbyterian Churches
First Presbyterian Church, Chester, West Virginia - Rev. Matt Camlin
Westminster Presbyterian Church, Chester, West Virginia - Rev. Katrina Lewis

Special Friend
Rev. Robert Marsh - Apt. 1221, 22680 Cedar Lane Ct., Leonardstown, MD 20650-3903

Also Remember in Prayer
Chambrel at Montrose, 100 Brookmont Rd, Akron OH 44333-3091
Thelma Longacre, Unit 210

Wyngate, 100 Wyngate Dr, Weirton WV 26062
Father of Mary Ann Ianni

Carriage House, 3106 St Charles Dr, Steubenville, OH 43952
Ruth Gilmore

Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Marge Black, Room 353
Mary Kay DePaolo
Dorothy Sobolak, Room 223
Bob Morgan
Mike Valiga
Alice Orr

Thursday, July 28, 2011

Minute for Mission - Medical Benevolence Foundation

Dr. Les Morgan talks with a patient in a hospital in Bangladesh as resident physicians observe.

One of the earliest international endeavors of the Presbyterian church in America was in response to a call in 1836 by the Nestorian church in Iran to send evangelists to help spread the gospel along the Silk Road to China.

Since then we have supported partner churches (and helped found many churches) as they shared God's grace in Jesus Christ with people in their own countries - churches spread as wide as the world.

With our partners we discovered that God's grace called us to serve the whole needs of people. The gospel drew us to reach deeper and deeper into people's lives, wherever grace could bring healing and hope.

For the last forty-eight years, the Medical Benevolence Foundation has strengthened that part of our partners' mission that seeks to provide preventative and curative care in Jesus' name. Through the generosity of many PC(USA) churches and members, we have supported missionaries, sent experts, shipped medicine and equipment, built facilities, raised funds, and prayed for medical mission.

Our goal is to help our partners help others have whole, full, healthy, and meaningful lives, thanks to God's healing love in Jesus.

--Rev. Dr. Will Browne, executive director, Medical Benevolence Foundation

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

A New Devotion on Our Prayer Line - Direction Signs

Psalm 119:105-112

105-112By your words I can see where I’m going;
they throw a beam of light on my dark path.
I’ve committed myself and I’ll never turn back
from living by your righteous order.
Everything’s falling apart on me, God;
put me together again with your Word.
Festoon me with your finest sayings, God;
teach me your holy rules.
My life is as close as my own hands,
but I don’t forget what you have revealed.
The wicked do their best to throw me off track,
but I don’t swerve an inch from your course.
I inherited your book on living; it’s mine forever—
what a gift! And how happy it makes me!
I concentrate on doing exactly what you say—
I always have and always will.


A Devotion by Zafar Iqbal (Punjab, Pakistan)

During my recent visit to the United States, I had to travel from Chicago to St. Louis. I reached the airport on time; but instead of looking at the direction signs to get to my flight, I sought guidance from a person, one who sent me off in the wrong direction. When I finally found the way I needed to go, I had very little time to reach the plane. Confused, I prayed and then followed the signs displayed for my flight. I reached the plane shortly before takeoff.

In a similar way in life, we reach our ultimate goal by following the direction signs clearly written in the word of God. One direction given in scripture became clear to my wife and me recently. As we were enthusiastically planning the future of our family, what we would do and where we would go, the scripture verse in my morning devotion spoke to me: “You do not even know what tomorrow will bring. What is your life? For you are a mist that appears for a little while and then vanishes” (James 4:14). I learned to seek God’s help as I plan. I am not the boss of my life; God is. And God is always faithful and good and right.

Presbyterian Disaster Assistance Situation Report - Somalia

July 22, 2011

On July 20, 2011, the United Nations Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs formally acknowledged that two regions within Southern Somalia are suffering from famine. "We still do not have all the resources for food, clean water, shelter and health services to save the lives of hundreds of thousands of Somalis in desperate need," Mark Bowden, the UN Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia, said.

No relief of the drought conditions leading to the famine is anticipated until this December or January of 2012.
This family has walked for five days through Somalia to reach the Ethiopian border. Photo courtesy of ACT/NCA/Laurie MacGregor

The dire situation in Somalia is forcing people from agro-pastoral areas to flee to the capital, Mogadishu, even though it is severely damaged by years of fighting. An unprecedented number of Somalis are crossing borders into neighboring countries. More than 140,000 Somalis have been forced to cross the borders so far this year. In June alone, more than 55,000 people fled across the borders into Ethiopia and Kenya – three times the number of the preceding month. Somali refugees are also arriving in Djibouti and the total number of Somali refugees in the three neighboring countries now stands at 582,000.

PDA response
Presbyterian Disaster Assistance (PDA) has provided $100,000 from One Great Hour of Sharing funds to help meet the immediate and basic humanitarian needs of people affected by the drought. PDA is responding to this crisis as a member of ACT Alliance. Fellow ACT Alliance members with programs in Somalia are planning to provide life-saving humanitarian assistance to newly displaced people in Mogadishu, drought affected people in Gedo region, refugees in Dadaab camp in Kenya and host communities in both countries.

ACT members are already in the process of distributing 262 tons of flour and 52 tons of cooking oil to the hardest-hit areas of Gedo province in Somalia. This initial delivery will assist more than 30,000 people in four villages for a month.

How You Can Help
We ask you to stand in the GAP for families affected by disasters and help the PC(USA) in its response.

GIVE. The generous sharing of your financial blessings through the One Great Hour of Sharing offering and special designated giving provides resources needed to assist with immediate and long-term recovery needs.

Individuals may give through your local Presbyterian congregation, on the secure PC(USA) Web site, or by sending a check to:

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
P.O. Box 643700
Pittsburgh, PA 15264-3700

Please include the special designated giving account DR999999 -International Response.

Congregations should send donations through their normal mission giving channels.

ACT. Stay informed and share information about the need with others. Sign up to receive PDA Rapid Information Network (PDA-RIN) email notices to alert you of additional needs.

PRAY. Our best response is prayer. 1 Thessalonians implores us to pray without ceasing, so your prayers are requested above all else. Please pray for families who are hungry, thirsty, displaced, or need medical care because of this crisis. Also pray for the people responding to the disaster, and for those whose lives are closely linked to both the disaster survivors and the workers who minister to them.

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Sunday's Sermon - Nothing

Romans 8:26-39

26-28Meanwhile, the moment we get tired in the waiting, God’s Spirit is right alongside helping us along. If we don’t know how or what to pray, it doesn’t matter. He does our praying in and for us, making prayer out of our wordless sighs, our aching groans.
He knows us far better than we know ourselves, knows our pregnant condition, and keeps us present before God. That’s why we can be so sure that every detail in our lives of love for God is worked into something good.

29-30God knew what he was doing from the very beginning. He decided from the outset to shape the lives of those who love him along the same lines as the life of his Son. The Son stands first in the line of humanity he restored. We see the original and intended shape of our lives there in him. After God made that decision of what his children should be like, he followed it up by calling people by name. After he called them by name, he set them on a solid basis with himself. And then, after getting them established, he stayed with them to the end, gloriously completing what he had begun.

31-39So, what do you think? With God on our side like this, how can we lose? If God didn’t hesitate to put everything on the line for us, embracing our condition and exposing himself to the worst by sending his own Son, is there anything else he wouldn’t gladly and freely do for us? And who would dare tangle with God by messing with one of God’s chosen? Who would dare even to point a finger? The One who died for us—who was raised to life for us!—is in the presence of God at this very moment sticking up for us. Do you think anyone is going to be able to drive a wedge between us and Christ’s love for us? There is no way! Not trouble, not hard times, not hatred, not hunger, not homelessness, not bullying threats, not backstabbing, not even the worst sins listed in Scripture:
They kill us in cold blood because they hate you.
We’re sitting ducks; they pick us off one by one.

None of this fazes us because Jesus loves us. I’m absolutely convinced that nothing—nothing living or dead, angelic or demonic, today or tomorrow, high or low, thinkable or unthinkable—absolutely nothing can get between us and God’s love because of the way that Jesus our Master has embraced us.


Nothing

This morning, we’re looking at what may be my favorite passage in the Bible. My goodness, it doesn’t get much better than this, that “nothing in all creation can separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord.” Wow. And that’s exactly how the eighth chapter of Paul’s letter to the Romans ends. Now this is something worth remembering. In fact, in my opinion, we’d all be in better shape if every Christian said it to themselves as soon as they got up in the morning and right before they went to bed at night.

And I’ll tell you something else, I wish this was the gospel we shared with, you know, to folks on the other side of the stained glass. I mean, wouldn’t it be wonderful if, through our words and actions, we could convey this incredible message with others and to do it without any additions. In other words, instead of saying the stuff that usually comes from the church, you know, like “nothing can separate you from the love of God, when...” or “nothing can separate you from the love of God, if...” or my personal favorite “nothing can separate you from the love of God, but...,” suppose we had the courage and the faith to simply repeat what Paul said, “nothing in all creation can separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord”: period, close the book, Elvis has left the building.

And you know, because I think what Paul has to say here was so good and clear, my sermon this morning is going to be a little different. I mean, instead of me standing up here and telling you what I think the passage says, I’m going to kind of get out of the way and see what it might have to say to some situations and people who just may need to hear this good news. Specifically, I’m going to speak for four people who are going through some of the stuff we all experience from time to time, and I’m talking about folks who are impatient and lonely, frustrated and afraid. I’m going to try to put into words what they might be feel. And then I’m going to try to step aside and let Paul speak. And so it’s as clear as possible, I decided to read the passage from Eugene Peterson’s paraphrase, The Message. And so that’s what we’re going to do this morning, and I hope, by the end of this sermon, we all understand just how much our lives can change the minute we accept that nothing can separate from the love of God in Christ Jesus. And when Paul wrote nothing, I think that’s exactly what he meant. And so here we go, person number one.

“Now before you say anything else, I don’t you to start with, ‘just pray about it.’ I’ve had it up to here with that stuff.” The woman turned her head away. She looked about fiftyish, but it was hard to tell. “It’s gotten so I can’t go to the church anymore. Now I don’t want to make out that nobody’s got the kind of problems I’ve got. I know that’s not so. Still, my life’s not a piece of cake. I mean, my Henry can’t get a job, not like the one he had when he was working at the mill. And our Susan, Lord know’s what’s she’s doing since she and that boy friend moved to Cincinnati. And you know, my health’s nothing to write home about; both my mom and grandmother died of cancer when they were in their sixties. Let’s just say I’ve got more than enough on my plate right now. And I’ll tell you, it seems all my ‘Christian’ friends can say is ‘you just need to take it to the Lord in prayer. Just give it to God.’ I mean, give me a break; you don’t think I’ve been doing that. You don’t think I’ve prayed that God help Henry as I sit back and watch him slowly give up, knowing that it’s probably never going to be better than it is right this minute, and it’s going to be a whole lot worst when he can’t work anymore and all we got is social security, assuming that’s going to be around. And you know, I can’t tell you how often I’ve prayed for Susan, that she somehow get a little direction in her life and that God protects her from what’s out there. And for me, I don’t know what we’ll do if I get sick. I pray and pray and pray, and it’s like I’m not trying hard enough. And I’ll tell you, it doesn’t help when they talk about how God seems to be helping everybody else; you know, how he’s provided the money to buy a new camper or got their son into medical school. And praise the Lord, God healed their hang nail. Give me a break. I just want to know, what’s wrong with me? I mean, they prayed and God gave them what they wanted, right? But what about me? Why isn’t God listening to me? Aren’t my needs as important as their’s? Is there some kind of trick that I’m missing? I just want to feel as though somebody out there is listening to me. I just want to feel as though I’m being heard.” The woman leaned forward, tears forming in the corners of her eyes.

To the Christians living in Roman, Paul wrote: “Meanwhile, the moment we get tired in the waiting, God’s Spirit is right alongside helping us along. If we don’t know how or what to pray, it doesn’t matter. He does our praying in and for us, making prayer out of our wordless sighs, our aching groans. He knows us far better than we know ourselves, knows our pregnant condition, and keeps us present before God. That’s why we can be so sure that every detail in our lives of love for God is worked into something good.” This is the word of the Lord.

He sort of looked up, toward nothing in particular. His hands were loosely held in his lap. “I didn’t expect it to be this hard. I guess thirty years wasn’t enough; I just wasn’t ready to say goodbye. Now it’s not that we didn’t have good times. Oh man, I think we fit a couple of life times in those thirty years. And since the kids were off on their own, with their own families... It was a good life. I miss her. But don’t get me wrong, I wouldn’t want her back, not the way she was at the end. She wasn’t living. And I believe she was and is in the hands of God and that one day we’ll be together again; I can’t let that go. I don’t want you to get the wrong idea. Sure, I got angry at first, you know, all the why me, why us. But that’s all gone. I guess I got to the point where it doesn’t really matter, the why? Bad things happen to good people. That’s just the way it is. It’s kind of like that place in the Bible where it says we need to enjoy living because tomorrow we may died. And that’s what happened. She died, and that I can handle. What’s tough is that I kind of died too, only I’m still alive. I feel all empty inside, with one day just like another. Nothing to look forward to, nothing really to live for. Oh I know that sounds all dramatic, and I know I have kids and grandkids, but you know, I’m just lonely. I feel as though I’m just going through the motions, you know, like I’m just treading water. If I could just get some of kind direction, some kind of awareness that I’m not alone.” He bowed his head and looked at his hands.

To the Christians living in Roman, Paul wrote: “God knew what he was doing from the very beginning. He decided from the outset to shape the lives of those who love him along the same lines as the life of his Son. The Son stands first in the line of humanity he restored. We see the original and intended shape of our lives there in him. After God made that decision of what his children should be like, he followed it up by calling people by name. After he called them by name, he set them on a solid basis with himself. And then, after getting them established, he stayed with them to the end, gloriously completing what he had begun.” This is the word of the Lord.

“Now before I say anything, there’s a couple of things I want to get straight.” He walked behind the chair and put one hand on the back. And then kind of waving the other one, he started. “First, I don’t want you to start telling me who I should be and what I should be doing, ok? Because, I’ll tell you, what you see is pretty much what you get. And I’m sick and tired of playing games. And if you can’t accept me for who I am, the heck with you. You know, I don’t get it. I pay my taxes. I go to work. In fact, I’m a darn good neighbor. I just don’t get why people treat me the way they do. Good night, I believe in Jesus and try to live the best kind of Christian life I can live. I don’t lie. I don’t cheat. Why do they dislike me; I don’t hurt anybody. It’s just so frustrating. And even if they don’t say anything, it’s like they’re looking at me, waiting for me to do Lord knows what. It’s just so stupid frustrating. But I’m sorry, I’m probably over reacting. You didn’t do anything. It’s just frustrating. I just want to be accepted for who I am, no better, no worse. But there seems to be folks that are, well, are out to get me. Talk about sounding paranoid, but I’ll tell you, it’s true. And I don’t get it. Sometimes it seems like the deck is stacked against me, you know, that no matter happens, I’m going to lose. And I get accused of doing stuff I’d never do in a million years. I’ve even been told that I shouldn’t even call myself a Christian because I can’t be. Can you believe it? What if I said that to you? How would you feel? What would you do? I just don’t understand. I’m not them; why can’t they accept me for who I am?” His voice kind of trailed off, sort of like a mechanical toy that’s just run down.

To the Christians living in Roman, Paul wrote: “So, what do you think? With God on our side like this, how can we lose? If God didn’t hesitate to put everything on the line for us, embracing our condition and exposing himself to the worst by sending his own Son, is there anything else he wouldn’t gladly and freely do for us? And who would dare tangle with God by messing with one of God’s chosen? Who would dare even to point a finger? The One who died for us—who was raised to life for us!—is in the presence of God at this very moment sticking up for us. Do you think anyone is going to be able to drive a wedge between us and Christ’s love for us? There is no way! Not trouble, not hard times, not hatred, not hunger, not homelessness, not bullying threats, not backstabbing, not even the worst sins listed in Scripture: They kill us in cold blood because they hate you. We’re sitting ducks; they pick us off one by one.” This is the word of the Lord.

She sat quietly in her chair. Her voice was calm, but you could feel almost a heaviness in her words. “I don’t know what to do,” she said. “I just don’t know what to do. One day just leads into another. And yesterday was better than today, and today will be better than tomorrow. Sometimes I feel like this huge mistake. You know, that’s what my parents used to say, that I was accident. What a wonderful thought, an accident, a mistake. Somehow I just slipped through the cracks. You know that movie, It’s a Wonderful Life? Well, I’ve prayed that I was never born. But you know, no angel came to me. And nobody ran around collecting money to save my skin. I guess there are no angels. But I know there are demons, not the kind with horns and pitchforks, but demons that kind of live within my head. And they whisper that I was an accident, a mistake; that no matter what I do or say, no one will really understand; that I am alone. I’ll tell you, when I start thinking about this stuff, I wonder, what’s the point? ‘I should have been a pair of ragged claws scuttling across floors of silent seas.’ I’m afraid to die, but I think I’m more afraid to live. Because I’m alone. In a world full of people, I’m alone.” A single tear rolled down her cheek.

To the Christians living in Roman, Paul wrote: “None of this fazes us because Jesus loves us. I’m absolutely convinced that nothing—nothing living or dead, angelic or demonic, today or tomorrow, high or low, thinkable or unthinkable—absolutely nothing can get between us and God’s love because of the way that Jesus our Master has embraced us.” This is the word of the Lord.

That’s what Paul wrote, and personally, it doesn’t get much better than that. And you know, I think this is something we really need to remember. I mean, when we feel impatient and lonely, frustrated and afraid, we need to remember that God is always, I mean, always with us. And that he couldn’t love us more than he does right this minute. And that when it comes to this unconditional and unlimited compassion for us, nothing in all creation can separate us from his love in Christ Jesus our Lord. Nothing.

Monday, July 25, 2011

Remembering Our Sister Lillian Losey

She was born Oct. 8, 1944 in Steubenville. She is the daughter of the late Adam and Anna Novak Losey, Lillian is also preceded in death by her uncle and aunt, William and Olga Novak Dorrance.

Lillian was retired from JP Morgan Chase, Steubenville with 43 years of service and was the treasurer of the Steubenville High School Class of 1959 reunion committee.

Surviving is her sister, Barbara Jean Losey with whom she resided.

Lillian was a member of Cove Presbyterian Church, Weirton and its Myrtle McHenry Class; member, recording secretary and past president of the Steubenville Women's Club, member and past president of the Business and Professional Women's Club, Bank Women of America, Federated Democratic Women's Club of Ohio and Jefferson Co. and the Fun Seekers.

Calling hours are Monday 3-7 p.m. at the Mosti Funeral Home, Sunset Chapel, 4435 Sunset Blvd. Steubenville, where services will be held 10:30 a.m., Dr. Ed Rudiger, officiant. Burial in Union Cemetery.

Offer condolences,http://www.mostifuneralhome.com/.

Saturday, July 23, 2011

HIS New Beginning

Faith Bonyak
When life throws you trials to separate Him from you.
Just remember that His word will always ring true.
When you're at death's door, and you cannont see the way.
Look through the tunnel, and His light will guide your way.
Finding your Faith in the midst of your strife,
will allow the Lord to completely change your life.
God has perfected the New Beginning.
Your Faith will point you in the right direction.
His Grace will be your new beginning.
And your life will shine with his perfection.
At life's darkest moments, the devil obstructs our view.
All he wants is a little bit more of you.
Hold strong to the words you know His love commands
Out of the darkness, you will see him holding on to your hand.
God has started your New beginning.
Go and live life like there is no tomorrow.
Once you start your new beginning,
God will erase and ease all your sorrow.
God has perfected the New Beginning.
Let a new beginning start right now in you.

Friday, July 22, 2011

A New Devotion on Our Prayer Line - Driving Safely

Proverbs 3:1-8

1My child, remember
my teachings and instructions
and obey them completely.

2They will help you live
a long and prosperous life.

3Let love and loyalty
always show like a necklace,
and write them in your mind.

4God and people will like you
and consider you a success.

5With all your heart
you must trust the LORD
and not your own judgment.

6Always let him lead you,
and he will clear the road
for you to follow.

7Don’t ever think that you
are wise enough,
but respect the LORD
and stay away from evil.

8This will make you healthy,
and you will feel strong.


A Devotion by Ma. Magdalena Alvarado G. (Coahuila, Mexico)

Sometimes early in the morning as I go to work, the fog is so dense that we drivers can hardly see anything. All that helps us are the lines on the road, emergency lights around accidents, and the signs that indicate the conditions ahead. What would happen if we did not have these helps to drive safely? Maybe we would not reach our destination or we would suffer more accidents.

In a similar way, I see that God uses scripture to show us the path we are to take. The Bible is full of advice for each situation we may confront in our daily living. For instance, Paul advises “So far as it depends on you, live peaceably with all” (Rom 12:18). “A soft answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger” (Prov 15:1) is another good piece of advice. The Teacher in Ecclesiastes tells us: “Though one might prevail against another, two will withstand one. A threefold cord is not quickly broken” (4:12).

We can choose whether to live according to our own will or to follow the Bible’s advice.

Announcements

The announcements as they appear in the bulletin are below:

OUR NURSERY FOR CHILDREN . . .
(infant thru five years) is open during Sunday School and the Worship Service, under the direction of Jenna Maine. We still need some volunteer help. If you can spare time to supervise the little ones please see Jenna after the service. We thank you in advance for caring for the future member of our Cove family.

DON’T FORGET SUNDAY SCHOOL . . .
we meet every Sunday morning at 9:45 a.m. Think about trying out one of our classes. We have a variety of classes to chose from to fit your needs.

WHEN WE BEGIN THE SERVICE. . .
our children carry red, orange and yellow streamers. This represents the coming of the Holy Spirit, filling the sanctuary as we prepare to worship. At the end of the service, they carry the streamers out, challenging us to carry the Spirit into the world.

JESUS TIME OFFERS THE YOUNGER CHILDREN . . .
of our congregation, between the ages of 3 and 11, the opportunity to worship in a special experience just for them. The children are dismissed to Jesus Time after a Special Time for Children.

THE BROWN BAG BIBLE STUDY WILL MEET . . .
next on Thursday, July 28, at 12:30 p.m. We’ll finish our study of John, by looking at 1 John 5. Grab your lunch and join us as we study God’s word.

GREETERS NEEDED . . .
if you would like to serve as a greeter before a Sunday morning worship service, please contact Bonnie Nichols at 304-723-5134.

SUMMER CAMPS . . .
Beaver Creek and Camp Presmont are offering a variety of camps this year for children of all ages and interests. Experience nature, swimming, fishing, and making crafts, while growing in your faith. View the different types of camps and their dates by checking out the bulletin board located in the main hallway downstairs or contact the church office for more information. Scholarships are available to children wishing to experience summer camp.

BEGINNING ON SUNDAY, JULY 24. . .
Pastor Rudiger will be leading a confirmation class for young people between the ages of 12 and 16, at 5:00 p.m.. If you're interested in learning more about the Christian faith and are considering announcing your faith in Jesus Christ, please plan to attend. At the end of the five weeks, you'll also have the chance to join our congregation. If you have any questions, please give us a call.

OUR VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL . . .
will run from August 1 through August 5, 6:30 p.m. till 8:00 p.m. Will have activities for young people from Preschool through high school. Contact the church office at 304-748-5980 to register your child

OUR ANNUAL CHURCH PICNIC. . .
is scheduled for Sunday, August 14 at Marland Heights Park. The worship service will begin at 11:00 a.m. Hot dogs, hamburgers, buns, fried chicken and beverages will be provided. Please bring a covered dish to share

WE ARE BLOGGING!
We now have six blogs that you can check out for information and on which you can leave comments. They're listed below:
• The Cove Community (www.thecovecommunity.blogspot.com) - This is for the whole church. I'll post sermons and announcements. I also invite y'all to send in material that you'd like to share with other members of the congregation. And please feel free to comment on anything you might read.
• Cove Kids (www.covekids.blogspot.com) - This is tailored for the preteen young people in our church. Again I'll post announcements. You're also invited to send in any writings, photographs and art work you'd like to post. And they don't have to all deal with the church. We also post artwork from Jesus Time.
• Glue (www.cove-glue.blogspot.com) - Our teens are running their own blog site; therefore, I have no idea what will be posted.
• Bible Talk (www.cove-bibletalk.blogspot.com) - We've established this blog to give pastors and lay people the chance to discuss Scripture. The weekly passages are from the Common Lectionary, and we're posting the pastor’s translation of the Greek text. We want you to read any or all of the passages and to leave any comment or ask any question that you feel is appropriate. Please include any research you've done. As we share our ideas and insights, we hope that we'll all come to a better and deeper understanding of the Bible. Each passage is linked to a website that offers some informative information.
• Let’s Talk About It (www.cove-talk.blogspot.com) - Through this site, we hope to encourage a conversation on a variety of topics. Since this blog is sponsored by a church, we expect most of the issues to involve the Christian faith. Still we don't want to limit ourselves or you. If you have a topic that you'd like us to discuss, include it as a comment to a previous issue. Please phrase it as a question and offer a summary of at least two positions. We'll add a new item to discuss every three weeks. We hope this challenges you to apply your faith to issues that are important to you.
• The Bible in a Year (www.cove-bibleinayear.blogspot.com/) - Each day, we'll post passages so that you can read the Bible in one year.

IT IS OFTEN DIFFICULT TO HEAR PRAYER REQUESTS . . .
on Sunday mornings. If you would like to have someone added to the prayer chain please drop a short note into the collection plate with their name and any other information you would like to share. You may also call the church office or e-mail the church with the information.

IF YOU LEAVE AN ITEM AT THE CHURCH . . .
for someone or for a specific function, please take a moment to write the information on the item. If there is no name on the item we will assume it is for the church in general.

IN THE HOSPITAL? HOMEBOUND? RECENT ILLNESS?. . .
if you are unable to attend services and would like to arrange for a visit from Rev. Ed Rudiger please contact the church office. Also if you would like to be included in our weekly bulletin mailings contact the church office.

WE CAN ALWAYS DO A BETTER JOB MINISTERING . . .
to the needs within this congregation, community and world. Please feel free to offer any suggestions as comments.

LOOSE CHANGE OFFERING . . .
Session has approved the Deacons collecting a “Loose Change Offering” that will be used to assist the Deacons with their utility assistance outreach program for Weirton residents or Cove Church members. We hope church members can help with the assistance program by donating some of their spare change. A container is placed in the Narthex each Sunday morning before church. The Deacons thank you for your continuing support of their projects.

PLEASE SUPPORT . . .
Cove Presbyterian Church’s Community Birthday Calendar. This will be our Seventh Annual Issue. All profits this year will be used for the current roof project. If you have any questions concerning listings or about the calendar project, please contact the church office. It’s a wonderful way to remember all your important dates! We are encouraging all members to participate! Listing deadline is Friday, July 29th.

VASES OF FLOWERS. . .
can be purchased for a service. The cost is $16.00 a vase. Silk flowers can be purchased for an additional cost. The flower calendar is located on the far wall in the church narthex or you can telephone the church office to place your order. After the service, the flowers will be placed in a plastic vase for you to take with you.

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS. . .
newsletters from old friends or articles about or by members of Cove Church, check out the bulletin board located in the hallway by the church offices. Past event pictures are also on display in that area.

WE’RE UPDATING OUR PRAYER AND DEVOTION LINE . . .
about four times a week. If you would like to call and hear a devotional, please call 304-748-7900.

SHOP ON LINE . . .
just use Good Search and Good Shop search engines to find what you are hunting for. List Cove Presbyterian Church as your charity and a percent of your purchase will come back to the church. It’s a simple way to raise money for the Cove Deacons while shopping for yourself!

ONGOING MISSION PROJECTS . . .
• Used Can Tabs are being collected for the Ronald McDonald House in Morgantown, West Virginia. Deposit your tabs in the container located in the main hallway downstairs. A recent thank you note from “The House” has been posted on the bulletin board.
• Campbell’s Labels are being collected by the Presbyterian Women and can be dropped off in the container located in the main hallway downstairs. These labels are being collected for the Weirton Christian Center.

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Prayer Requests

The following are needs we'll lift to God on Sunday. If you have anyone to add, please let us know. Thanks.

Adults
Betty
Bill Moulds
Charley
Connie Francis
Dave Bever
David Crow
Dr. James W. Valuska, Sr.
Ijawoye Oludare
Joanna Tsiftis Xylas
John Brothers
Loretta Hess
Mary & Jack Games
Mr. & Mrs. Mario Whitehead & Joyce
Nick Palavis
Paul Buck
Phyllis Manley
Rhonda Bruich
Rose Mader
Vicki Williams
Virginia Welch
Bob Saffle
Taylor Harris
Pam Haller
Bonnie Kirtley
Rachael
Jennifer Dahlem
Charles Saffle
Andrea Vincent
Christy Cybulski
Andy DiRemigio
Chum Robert
Donna Jenkins
Bill Churchman
Don Billham
Greta Billham
Judy Dobbins
John F. Roberts
Chuck Porter
Denise Krofchek
Rev. William Allen Jr.
Ann Varner
Rev. Colleen Griffith
Tom Parsons
Byron McElroy
Tom Lint
Rick Swain
Dave Adler
David Kline
Marie Luckhardt
Pete Jones
Rev. Alan Parr
Yiayia

Kids
Audri King
Brandon Wares
Brody McUmor
Daisy Emmerick
Georgie Platt
Hunter Stafford
Jeffrey Konovich
Jonah Becker
Justus Loughry
Kya Schwertfeger
Michael Liptak
Shelby Kamarec
Sierra Huey
Zoe Purcell

Military
Chad Peppler
Jonathan Criss
Kendra Mader
Michael Criss
Stephen Mader

Troops
Our troops all around the world need our prayers for strength, endurance, and safety.

Bereaved Family
The Family of Karen Edwards

Church Families
Suellen Lewis
Jim & Carolyn Longacre
Thelma Longacre

Local Church
Church of Christ, Pennsylvania Ave

Other Presbyterian Churches
Wolf Run Presbyterian Church, Cameron, West Virginia - Ms. Cindy Foster
Concord Presbyterian Church, Centerville, Ohio - Mr. Danny Aderholt

In the Hospital
Virginia Welch - Weirton Medical Center, Room 820-1

Special Friend
Thelma Longacre

Also Remember in Prayer
Chambrel at Montrose, 100 Brookmont Rd, Akron OH 44333-3091
Thelma Longacre, Unit 210

Wyngate, 100 Wyngate Dr, Weirton WV 26062
Father of Mary Ann Ianni

Carriage House, 3106 St Charles Dr, Steubenville, OH 43952
Ruth Gilmore

Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Marge Black, Room 353
Mary Kay DePaolo
Dorothy Sobolak, Room 223
Bob Morgan
Mike Valiga
Alice Orr

Serra House Grace Cottage, 195 Eden Drive, Weirton WV 26062-3664
Julia Maine

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

A New Devotion on Our Prayer Line - The Privilege of Giving

2 Corinthians 9:6-13

6Remember this saying, “A few seeds make a small harvest, but a lot of seeds make a big harvest.”

7Each of you must make up your own mind about how much to give. But don’t feel sorry that you must give and don’t feel that you are forced to give. God loves people who love to give. 8God can bless you with everything you need, and you will always have more than enough to do all kinds of good things for others. 9The Scriptures say, “God freely gives his gifts to the poor, and always does right.”

10God gives seed to farmers and provides everyone with food. He will increase what you have, so that you can give even more to those in need. 11You will be blessed in every way, and you will be able to keep on being generous. Then many people will thank God when we deliver your gift.

12What you are doing is much more than a service that supplies God’s people with what they need. It is something that will make many others thank God. 13The way in which you have proved yourselves by this service will bring honor and praise to God. You believed the message about Christ, and you obeyed it by sharing generously with God’s people and with everyone else.


A Devotion by Charles Levy (Ontario, Canada)

Once a week, I volunteer to drive adults who have medical appointments but do not have transportation. Usually this is a pleasant and rewarding job, giving me the opportunity to meet and converse with people from many walks of life. However, occasionally the task can be quite demanding. One man is in a wheelchair. I drive him to the hospital, wheel him along a 200-yard corridor, take him up six floors in an elevator, and deliver him to a dialysis unit where he receives treatment. Four hours later, I return and reverse the process to take him home.

Strange as it may seem, I relish this assignment. One reason is that 10 years ago when my kidneys failed, I was saved from a similar plight. I was spared the burden of having to undergo dialysis three or four times a week because my wonderful daughter insisted on donating one of her kidneys to me.

I live now in certain awareness of what Jesus said was expected of those who receive great blessings. I have freedom, good health, a loving family, food and shelter. In gratitude, I take advantage of the chance to help others.

Sunday, July 17, 2011

Minute for Mission - Smaller Membership Church

The Branch of the Lord will be beautiful and glorious. . . . It will be a shelter and shade from the heat of the day, and a refuge and hiding place from the storm and rain (Isaiah 4:2, 6, NIV ).

On April 12, 1908, Mrs. George Shumake gathered neighborhood kids under an old fir tree to teach them Bible stories. Their voices rose to catch the ear of a Presbyterian minister who would go on to help Mrs. Shumake found . I thought about Mrs. Shumake as I stood beneath the branches of a different fir tree a hundred years later.

Stephen was four years old when his mother, Antonia, began coming to our food bank. His dark curly hair and big brown eyes poked from behind his mother's legs. Their visits to our food bank continued for over a year until one day I noticed their absence. I asked another lady about Antonia, and she explained that she and her five kids didn't need the help anymore.

At least a year later I read in the newspaper that a seventeen-year-old boy had been shot and killed by a group of teenagers in the park next to our church. When I read the last name, I thought of Antonia. Within hours flowers and candles encircled the fir tree where Antonia's oldest son, Fernando, died. A few days later, a ministry organized a moment of blessing to grieve the loss and reclaim the space for peace. Just as we were about to start, I saw Antonia approach the park. In her hand was that of a boy twice as tall as I remember, but with the same dark, curly hair and brown eyes. As another minister prayed beside the base of this old fir tree, I looked at Stephen and thought of those kids from a century ago.

The tree, the teacher, and the kids have all changed, but the need to share God's love has not. This is why God keeps us here, that the Stephens of Manitou might experience the love that carries them through loss and leads them on the path of life.

- Rev. Kenneth W. Sikes, Manitou Park Presbyterian Church, Tacoma, Washington

Friday, July 15, 2011

Presbyterian Disaster Report Situation Report - Horn of Africa (East Africa) Drought

2011 has been the driest period in the Eastern Horn of Africa since 1995. Although Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia saw the late arrival of the long pastoral rains this past spring (March-May), the amounts received were extremely low.

The resulting drought — the worst in several decades —has led to failed crops, food shortages, skyrocketing food prices and malnutrition. Parts of Kenya have experienced malnutrition rates of up to 37.4 percent, the highest recorded in 20 years and more than double the UN World Health Organization (WHO) emergency threshold of 15 percent.

It is estimated that more than 10 million people in Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya are affected by the drought. At present the situation has reached a point that communities cannot survive any longer without external support. The emergency is expected to spread rapidly in the country as short-rains will not begin until October/November, and increasing food prices are causing country-wide food shortages.

Thousands upon thousands are leaving their homes in order to meet their basic need for water and food. The Dadaab refugee camp on the Kenya-Somalia border, run by PDA’s ecumenical partner ACT Alliance, has been receiving about 1,300 people daily, mostly women with children and elderly people. The noticeable influx of people fleeing the drought began at the end of May, swelling an already overcrowded camp that is now home to 370,000.

ACT’s Lennart Hernander, in Nairobi, says people are arriving at Dadaab noticeably malnourished, and that between 20 and 30 children die of malnutrition in the camp each month. “In June, it was obvious just by passing through the graveyard that there were new children’s graves.

“When people arrive, they are exhausted from walking and often dehydrated. We are seeing more older people which is unusual. The elderly tend to stay put in their homes until things get really bad,” Hernander said.

Some new arrivals had travelled from as far as Mogadishu, in some cases on foot over 1,000 km. Malnutrition rates among new arrivals reached 15 percent.

ACT members in the region say they have never seen such a crisis in their lives, with one member of staff saying “things are changing by the hour and the situation has never been this bad.”

PDA response

PDA is responding as a member of ACT Alliance in the two worst-affected countries, Kenya and Ethiopia. ACT is distributing food and supplementary feeding for children, the elderly and nursing mothers, improving existing water supplies and trucking in water to some areas.

For now the priority is to meet people’s urgent need for food, clean water, shelter and medicine and to join forces with other aid agencies, UN bodies and governments in order to reach as many as possible of the 10 million people who risk starving to death.

How You Can Help

You can stand in the “GAP” for disaster survivors and help the church in this response.

GIVE. The generous sharing of your financial blessings through the One Great Hour of Sharing offering and special designated giving provides resources needed to assist with immediate emergency needs, clean up provisions, long-term and unmet needs, and spiritual/emotional counseling.

Individuals may give online, or through their local Presbyterian congregation, on the secure PC(USA) Web site or by sending their check to:

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
P.O. Box 643700
Pittsburgh, PA 15264-3700

To support international response, please include the special designated giving account DR999999 – International Disasters and Emergencies.

Congregations should send donations through their normal mission giving channels.

ACT. Stay informed and share information about the need with others. Sign up to receive PDA Rapid Information Network (PDA-RIN) email notices to alert you of additional needs.

PRAY. Our best response is prayer. 1 Thessalonians implores us to pray without ceasing, so your prayers are requested above all else. Please pray for families living through the drought conditions, including many thousands seeking assistance in the overcrowded refugee camps, and that the assistance we offer will bear the hope of Christ as it helps meet physical needs.

Monday, July 11, 2011

Minute for Mission - Princeton Theological Seminary

When the earthquake struck his native Haiti in 2010, Emmanuel Bourjolly was ministering at the Albert C. Wagner Youth Correctional Facility in New Jersey. As the prison chaplain, he gathered the inmates to pray for those in his homeland who had lost family, homes, and friends - not unlike the inmates themselves.

Bourjolly, who graduated from Princeton Seminary in 2006, did his field education at Wagner. As he met the inmates, many of whom knew only gang violence, he shared his experience growing up amid poverty and illiteracy, and the support that the church offered. "I was educated in a church that taught me that the world was my parish,'' he says.

After he graduated, he briefly taught high school math before he was asked to become Wagner's chaplain. On his first day, an administrator told him, "You might have great ideas, but you can't change the way things operate around here.'' Undeterred, he led chapel services (both Christian and interfaith) and Bible studies. He visited inmates in their cells. Soon, lines formed outside the cells where he was meeting, the young prisoners waiting to talk to this man who listened to them and who brought hope.

"If they are interested, I offer my own pain,'' says Bourjolly, who arrived in the United States at age thirty-five with no English-language skills or family connections. He wants to help his "congregation'' call upon the redemptive power of God. He teaches them skills that will equip them for life on the outside. He draws inspiration from Bonhoeffer's experience with the underground seminary in Germany and from his professors at Princeton, who he says "educated the biases out of me, helped me understand others' beliefs, and gave me the gift of a lifelong practice of theological inquiry.'' Now Bourjolly's own life, nurtured by the church and formed in the seminary, is bringing forth life abundant, thirty, sixty, and one hundredfold.

- Dr. Iain Torrance, president, Princeton Theological Seminary

Presbyterian Disaster Assistance Situation Report - Flooding in the Midwest and upper Midwest

June 29, 2011

Heavy rains and storms from this past spring have left numerous communities devastated or impacted by severe flooding as we move into summer. States that have suffered from record or near record flooding include Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Missouri. The city most impacted is Minot, North Dakota, located on the Souris River (also called Mouse River). About 11,000 people - a third of this small town of 36,000 - were evacuated from their homes.

The river in Minot crested two feet lower than expected on Monday, June 27, but that is nearly 13 feet above flood stage. About 4,000 homes experienced flood water levels of 6 feet or more.
Photo courtesy of the Grand Forks Sherrifs Dept.


Flooding of the Missouri River has also created major evacuations. In Pierre, South Dakota, 1,300 families were evacuated over the weekend of June 25. On June 28, six counties in Iowa received Presidential Major Disaster Declarations. Closely watched are nuclear power plants in Nebraska that have been completely surrounded by water.

The Missouri River levels are expected to remain about 6 feet above flood stage in Nebraska and Iowa and as much as 10 feet above flood stage in Missouri for the next several weeks.

PDA response

Presbyterian Disaster Assistance(PDA) has been in touch with all affected presbyteries to offer One Great Hour of Sharing funds, the presence of National Response Team (NRT) members to provide spiritual care and to help to assess damages and needs, and whatever additional help PDA can provide.

What you can do

You can help the church in this response and stand in the GAP for those affected by this disaster.

GIVE
The generous sharing of your financial blessings through the One Great Hour of Sharing offering and special designated giving provides resources needed to assist with immediate emergency needs, clean up provisions, long-term and unmet needs, and spiritual/emotional counseling.

Individuals may give to OGHS through a local Presbyterian congregation, on the secure PC(USA) Web site, or by sending a check to:

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
P.O. Box 643700
Pittsburgh, PA 15264-3700

Please include the special designated giving account DR000015 – U.S.A. Disasters and Emergencies.

Congregations should send donations through their normal mission giving channels.

ACT
Stay informed and share information about the need with others. Sign up to receive PDA Rapid Information Network (PDA-RIN) email notices to alert you of additional needs and information about current and urgent disaster responses.

Clean up buckets will be needed as the waters recede and people return to their homes and begin the muck-out and clean-up process. Download a bulletin insert about the need for cleanup buckets or read more about Gift of the Heart Kits.

Register your volunteer work team for current opportunities around the United States or to be notified when new volunteer hosting sites open in response to the spring storms. Call 866-732-6121, or register your team’s interest online.

PRAY
Our best response is prayer. 1 Thessalonians implores us pray without ceasing, so your prayers are requested above all else. Please pray for those displaced by the floods, those who lost loved ones, and those who will work to offer spiritual and emotional care or help with recovery efforts when the waters recede.

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Sunday's Sermon - Jekyll and Hyde

Romans 7:13-25a

13Now did the good become death for me? Absolutely not, but it was the sin, so that it might be shown as sin, through the good produced death, so that the sin might become extremely sinful
through the commandments. 14For we know that the law is spiritual, but I myself am fleshly, having been sold under sin. 15For what I produce, I don’t understand. For what I want, this I don’t practice, but what I hate, this I do. 16But if what I don’t want, this I do, then I agree that the law is good.

17But now it’s no longer I who produce, but the sin which dwells in me. 18For I know that in me, that is in my flesh, there dwells nothing good. For to want is present with me, but to produce the good is not. 19For the good that I want I don’t do, but the bad that I don’t want, this I practice. 20But if what I don’t want, this I myself do, then no longer am I producing it but the sin that dwells in me.

21So I find it to be a law, when I want to do the good, that the bad is present with me. 22For I rejoice in the law of God with respect to the inner person, 23but I see another law in my members warring against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner to the law of sin which is in my members. 24Wretched person I am, who will deliver me from this body of death? 25Thanks to God through Jesus Christ our Lord.


Jekyll and Hyde

I think I’ve probably mentioned this before, but let me say it again. I really enjoy musical theater. I’ve got a bunch of cast recordings in my office, and I’ve already bought my season tickets for the Broadway series, beginning in the fall. And since I enjoy it so much, I figure it’s something I can share with Maggie. And so, when Debbie and I think it’s appropriate, we take her to see different shows. For example, last year she saw Into the Woods and Mary Poppins and Grease, just to name a few.

Well, a couple of weeks ago, down at the Benedum, they had a show that I’d seen years ago back in Indianapolis and that I really enjoyed called Jekyll and Hyde. I’m telling you, the music is wonderful. Anyway, I thought that this was one of the shows that Maggie would enjoy, and since Debbie really didn’t have any interest in seeing it, my daughter and I had a date a week ago Wednesday. We both got all dressed up, she wore her piano recital dress. We drove downtown, got to our seats and watched the show. And outside of one scene that Maggie didn’t want to see and so she kind of buried her face in my jacket, I think she had a great time. Of course, buying a stuffed crab as a souvenir and a box of Crunch and Bunch didn’t hurt.

Now this musical is based on the story of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. And even if you haven’t read the book, I think most people have seen some kind of movie, even that one when Bugs Bunny turns into a monster drinking this stuff. And so I think most of y’all know the plot. Dr. Jekyll develops a formula intended to isolate the evil found in all of us. And when he tests it on himself, he becomes Mr. Hyde, the personification of everything that’s wicked and cruel. And even though at first, he kind of likes changing back and forth because there are all kinds of things that he can do as Hyde that he won’t do as Jekyll, eventually, he feels frustration and despair, especially when the transformations start happening without him taking the formula. And by the end, Jekyll gets to the point where he seems to lose all hope that he’ll ever be able to be the person he wants to do be. Now, that’s the story in a nutshell.

And I’ll tell you, I think that’s kind of how we feel as Christians, sort of like Jekyll and Hyde. I mean, I think everybody here knows something about right and wrong; in fact, I believe that’s pretty much the case whether we’re Christian or not. And as believers, good night, we know that we should be treating other people with respect and kindness; at the very least, as followers of Jesus Christ, we should be nice to one another. I mean, he did say love one another as I have loved you. And loving one another means that there’s a lot we should avoid doing and a lot we should set as a priority, you know, like building one another up; right? Daaa, with three a’s. Now, we all know this stuff.

And yet doing it, well that’s another matter, isn’t it? I mean, knowing doesn’t mean doing. And so even though we know that what we’re saying or doing is going to hurt a person for whom Jesus Christ died, we say or do it anyway. We share the gossip or we laugh at the joke. We walk pass the woman holding the sign and we ignore those in our world and our country and maybe our neighborhoods who lack what we consider basic. Man, we even grumble and complain about the government taking action, even though we know no one else is going help and I certainly include the church in that “no one else.” In other words, often we fail to live up to what God has called and equipped us to be. And then to make matters worse, we come up with stuff to justify our failure.

And although a few people have done this so long that they’ve developed callouses on their consciences or have become so creative and self-serving in their interpretation of Jesus Christ and the love he commanded that they can make every nasty thing they’ve done or loving act they’ve left undone sound spiritual, I don’t think that’s the case for most of us. I mean, even if we’ve gotten comfortable running with the crowd, I believe we still feel something when we consider that one day God may hold us accountable for the pain we’ve caused and the help we’ve withheld. And you know, it’s amazing, I think some of those feelings are the same kind of things felt by our friend, Henry Jekyll. I mean, I believe there are times we feel frustrated, even angry at ourselves, because, my gosh, we know better. It’s not that we’ve never been told, what we should and shouldn’t do. It’s all over the place in the Bible. And yet, when push came to shove, we screw up all the time. And if knowing this causes us to be frustrated with ourselves, man, it’s got to lead to some real despair as we approach God. I’ll tell you, speaking for myself, sometimes I’m a shamed even to look in his direction. Because even though I may have neatly justified the comment I made and the pain I’ve ignored, I know in my heart of hearts, God isn’t stupid. He knows. He knows what I said and why I said it. He know what I could have done and why I didn’t do it. He knows. And what’s worst, I know he knows. And because of that, if I were sitting on his judgement seat, I’m not sure I’d look down on Ed Rudiger and say, “Enter, you who are blessed by my Father! Take what’s coming to you in this kingdom. It’s been ready for you since the world’s foundation. And here’s why: I was hungry and you fed me, I was thirsty and you gave me a drink, I was homeless and you gave me a room, I was shivering and you gave me clothes, I was sick and you stopped to visit, I was in prison and you came to me.” Man, I don’t do this kind of stuff I want to but for whatever reason I don’t; I know it, and I know God knows is too. I’ll tell you, I know how Jekyll felt at the end of the story.

And you know, I think the passage we just read shows that Paul understood this too. And you know, I don’t believe he can get much more personal than he did in these verses. I mean, instead of talking about “them,” he used the pronoun “me.” In other words, this was his story, and I think if we’re honest with ourselves, I think most of us can see ourselves in there as well. My goodness, just think about what he wrote. He really nailed our nature, didn’t he; you know, how we know right from wrong, how we know what Jesus wants us to be, and how we know exactly the kinds of things we should be doing and saying right along with the times we should sit still and shut up. My gosh, we know this already. And yet, and yet, we don’t do it. We don’t do what we know is right, and instead, we do what’s easy and what’s comfortable and what’s popular, in other words, stuff that’s more often than not wrong. And if the callouses aren’t too thick, we feel guilty about it. Now, Paul wrote that this happens because of sin, that sin has become so much a part of us that it’s like our very flesh and bones. And that sin is like a gorilla in a room or like the formula Jekyll made; it’s so strong that we do what it wants. It’s kind of like Flip Wilson used to say when he was Geraldine; the Devil or better sin makes us do it. And that’s just the way it is; that’s just who we are.

And if that’s all there is, I have to agree with Paul. The only thing we can say is “Wretched person I am, who will deliver me from this body of death?” I mean, if this is it, if this all we have, then I don’t think we can expect anything better than frustration and despair. Man, we have no hope.

But, of course, that’s not how Paul ends this passage nor should we. Because after everything else, after all the failures, after all the weakness, after all the words we’ve said and the works we’ve avoided, there’s one thing left. And here it is: “Thanks to God through Jesus Christ our Lord.” You see, that’s it. We’ve disappointed our God. We’ve disappointed our neighbors. And we’ve disappointed ourselves. That’s just the way it is. And although we can probably do better than we’ve done, we’re just not able to be perfect no matter how hard we try. We’re never going to be everything God created us to be. And brothers and sisters, no matter what we claim and how good we are at deceiving ourselves and others, we’re never, I mean, we’re never going to live as though Christ is first in our lives. It’s like someone asked, “If you were arrested for being a follower of Jesus Christ, would there be enough evidence to convict?” Talk about frustration and despair.

But you know, having said all that, “Thanks to God through Jesus Christ our Lord.” I’ll tell you, that’s just as true as everything else. Do we fail to be everything God created us to be and to do everything Christ commanded us to do? You betcha. But you know, “Thanks to God through Jesus Christ our Lord.” And when we look in the mirror, do we know that we could be more kind and compassionate and that we could better show through tangible ways, you know, like how we spend our time and money, that God is at least in our live’s top ten? Yes, sir. But remember, “Thanks to God through Jesus Christ our Lord.” And as the world watches, can we show more love to our neighbors whether they live next door or on the other side of the world and can we be a little nicer to our brothers and sisters in Christian? Without a doubt. But let’s never forget, “Thanks to God through Jesus Christ our Lord.” “Thanks to God through Jesus Christ our Lord.”

And if we believe it, maybe some of the frustration and despair we feel when we think about how we always seem to fall at least a little short, maybe it’ll turn to praise as we think about God and all he’s done for us. And maybe it’ll turn to humility as we look into the mirror. And maybe it’ll turn to acceptance and compassion as we reach out to others. You see, although it won’t erase our weaknesses, knowing that we’re loved by the Father and redeemed by the Son and inspired and empowered by the Spirit, well, that can make an enormous difference in what we feel and how we live.

Of course, this isn’t how Jekyll and Hyde ended. You see, the only way Jekyll could escape his bondage to Hyde was to die. And that’s what happened. But for us, “Thanks to God through Jesus Christ our Lord,” our death isn’t necessary, at least not right now. Because without our permission or help, Jesus has already died for us and we now belong to God. And through him, whatever frustration and despair we might feel can be changed to praise and humility and acceptance. And even though we’ll continue to be less than we may want to be and feel as though we’ve let ourselves and others down, God’s love for us, well, that just won’t change.

Sunday, July 3, 2011

Minute for Mission - Pittsburgh Theological Seminary

As president of a theological seminary, one of my great joys is visiting with pastors who have returned to campus for a continuing education event. Recently, one pastor told me that a seminar taught by one of our faculty members had brought Jerusalem and Samaria to life for him. He couldn't wait to share his insights with his congregation! Another pastor found renewed strength for her journey in a series on women and ministry. At Pittsburgh Theological Seminary we believe that continuing education is critical for pastors and laity throughout our church. Our vision statement says that we want to prepare "life-long learners who continue seeking wisdom and modeling the faith."

Cross reflected in the cupola atop
Long Hall at Pittsburgh Theological Seminary.
One of the lectionary passages for today is from Matthew 11: "Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy and my burden is light'' (NIV).

When we are tired and overwhelmed, making time for lifelong learning provides us the connection with God that we desperately need. Each year our Continuing Education Program offers five annual lectureships, short-term workshops on a variety of contemporary subjects, commissioned lay pastor training, travel study trips, interim ministry training, continuing education for psychologists and social workers, and certification courses for Christian educators. Come, drink deep from the well of lifelong learning in Christ at one of the theological schools of our church. You will find food for your mind, joy for your heart, and rest for your soul.

— Rev. Dr. William J. Carl III, president and professor of homiletics, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary

Saturday, July 2, 2011

A New Devotion on the Prayer Line - An Opportunity to Pray

Colossians 1:1-14

1-2I, Paul, have been sent on special assignment by Christ as part of God’s master plan. Together with my friend Timothy, I greet the Christians and stalwart followers of Christ who live in Colosse. May everything good from God our Father be yours!

3-5Our prayers for you are always spilling over into thanksgivings. We can’t quit thanking God our Father and Jesus our Messiah for you! We keep getting reports on your steady faith in Christ, our Jesus, and the love you continuously extend to all Christians. The lines of purpose in your lives never grow slack, tightly tied as they are to your future in heaven, kept taut by hope.

5-8The Message is as true among you today as when you first heard it. It doesn’t diminish or weaken over time. It’s the same all over the world. The Message bears fruit and gets larger and stronger, just as it has in you. From the very first day you heard and recognized the truth of what God is doing, you’ve been hungry for more. It’s as vigorous in you now as when you learned it from our friend and close associate Epaphras. He is one reliable worker for Christ! I could always depend on him. He’s the one who told us how thoroughly love had been worked into your lives by the Spirit.

9-12Be assured that from the first day we heard of you, we haven’t stopped praying for you, asking God to give you wise minds and spirits attuned to his will, and so acquire a thorough understanding of the ways in which God works. We pray that you’ll live well for the Master, making him proud of you as you work hard in his orchard. As you learn more and more how God works, you will learn how to do your work. We pray that you’ll have the strength to stick it out over the long haul—not the grim strength of gritting your teeth but the glory-strength God gives. It is strength that endures the unendurable and spills over into joy, thanking the Father who makes us strong enough to take part in everything bright and beautiful that he has for us.
13-14God rescued us from dead-end alleys and dark dungeons. He’s set us up in the kingdom of the Son he loves so much, the Son who got us out of the pit we were in, got rid of the sins we were doomed to keep repeating.


A Devotion by Jeff Matthews (Illinois)

“All inmates get down on the ground!” The prerecorded message repeatedly blared from the guard tower. A man with a rifle scanned the compound from the tower window, ready to shoot. “Officer needs assistance!” screamed the frantic voice over the two-way radio. Like ants pouring out of the ground, prison staff came running from every direction.

In the midst of this chaos, I calmly lay face down on the ground and prayed for the safety of the prison staff running by me, the inmates fighting in the distance, and the medical personnel en route. We needed divine intervention.

Opportunities to pray for the needs of others are all around us each day. We are not powerless; our prayers can alter the outcomes of situations. Prayer is a privilege God bestows on each of us. When we pray for others, we “seek to do good to one another and to all” (1 Thess. 5:15, NRSV). Someone, some where needs our prayers. This is why the Bible tells us to pray for others. Who needs your prayers right now?

Friday, July 1, 2011

Announcements

The announcements as they appear in Sunday's bulletin are below:

OUR NURSERY FOR CHILDREN . . .
(infant thru five years) is open during Sunday School and the Worship Service, under the direction of Jenna Maine. We still need some volunteer help. If you can spare time to supervise the little ones please see Jenna after the service. We thank you in advance for caring for the future member of our Cove family.

DON’T FORGET SUNDAY SCHOOL . . .
we meet every Sunday morning at 9:45 a.m. Think about trying out one of our classes. We have a variety of classes to chose from to fit your needs.

WHEN WE BEGIN THE SERVICE. . .
our children carry red, orange and yellow streamers. This represents the coming of the Holy Spirit, filling the sanctuary as we prepare to worship. At the end of the service, they carry the streamers out, challenging us to carry the Spirit into the world.

JESUS TIME OFFERS THE YOUNGER CHILDREN . . .
of our congregation, between the ages of 3 and 11, the opportunity to worship in a special experience just for them. The children are dismissed to Jesus Time after a Special Time for Children.

CHURCH & OFFICE CLOSED . . .
Monday, July 4 in observance of the Independence Day Holiday.

THE BROWN BAG BIBLE STUDY WILL NOT MEET . . .
until Thursday, July 21.

GREETERS NEEDED . . .
if you would like to serve as a greeter before a Sunday morning worship service, please contact Bonnie Nichols at 304-723-5134.

SUMMER CAMPS . . .
Beaver Creek and Camp Presmont are offering a variety of camps this year for children of all ages and interests. Experience nature, swimming, fishing, and making crafts, while growing in your faith. View the different types of camps and their dates by checking out the bulletin board located in the main hallway downstairs or contact the church office for more information. Scholarships are available to children wishing to experience summer camp.

ANNUAL MISSION TRIP . . .
July 10 thru the 16, will again be centered around Kopperston, West Virginia. We will be working to make homes and churches safe, dry and warm. You do not need to be a professional, you just need a desire to help those in need and also a willingness to listen if they need someone to talk to. For more information or to pick-up a registration form contact Tim Connell at 304-748-5655 or stop-in the church office.

BEGINNING ON SUNDAY, JULY 24,
Pastor Rudiger will be leading a confirmation class for young people between the ages of 12 and 16. If you're interested in learning more about the Christian faith and are considering announcing your faith in Jesus Christ, please plan to attend. At the end of the five weeks, you'll also have the chance to join our congregation. If you have any questions, please give us a call.

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL . . .
will be the first week in August. Please watch the bulletins for further details. If y would like to volunteer a little of your time to help with this special event, please contact the church office.

WE ARE BLOGGING!
We now have six blogs that you can check out for information and on which you can leave comments. They're listed below:
• The Cove Community (www.thecovecommunity.blogspot.com) - This is for the whole church. I'll post sermons and announcements. I also invite y'all to send in material that you'd like to share with other members of the congregation. And please feel free to comment on anything you might read.
• Cove Kids (www.covekids.blogspot.com) - This is tailored for the preteen young people in our church. Again I'll post announcements. You're also invited to send in any writings, photographs and art work you'd like to post. And they don't have to all deal with the church. We also post artwork from Jesus Time.
• Glue (www.cove-glue.blogspot.com) - Our teens are running their own blog site; therefore, I have no idea what will be posted.
• Bible Talk (www.cove-bibletalk.blogspot.com) - We've established this blog to give pastors and lay people the chance to discuss Scripture. The weekly passages are from the Common Lectionary, and we're posting the pastor’s translation of the Greek text. We want you to read any or all of the passages and to leave any comment or ask any question that you feel is appropriate. Please include any research you've done. As we share our ideas and insights, we hope that we'll all come to a better and deeper understanding of the Bible. Each passage is linked to a website that offers some informative information.
• Let’s Talk About It (www.cove-talk.blogspot.com) - Through this site, we hope to encourage a conversation on a variety of topics. Since this blog is sponsored by a church, we expect most of the issues to involve the Christian faith. Still we don't want to limit ourselves or you. If you have a topic that you'd like us to discuss, include it as a comment to a previous issue. Please phrase it as a question and offer a summary of at least two positions. We'll add a new item to discuss every three weeks. We hope this challenges you to apply your faith to issues that are important to you.
• The Bible in a Year (www.cove-bibleinayear.blogspot.com/) - Each day, we'll post passages so that you can read the Bible in one year.

IT IS OFTEN DIFFICULT TO HEAR PRAYER REQUESTS . . .
on Sunday mornings. If you would like to have someone added to the prayer chain please drop a short note into the collection plate with their name and any other information you would like to share. You may also call the church office or e-mail the church with the information.

IF YOU LEAVE AN ITEM AT THE CHURCH . . .
for someone or for a specific function, please take a moment to write the information on the item. If there is no name on the item we will assume it is for the church in general.

IN THE HOSPITAL? HOMEBOUND? RECENT ILLNESS?. . .
if you are unable to attend services and would like to arrange for a visit from Rev. Ed Rudiger please contact the church office. Also if you would like to be included in our weekly bulletin mailings contact the church office.

WE CAN ALWAYS DO A BETTER JOB MINISTERING . . .
to the needs within this congregation, community and world. Please feel free to offer any suggestions as comments.

LOOSE CHANGE OFFERING . . .
Session has approved the Deacons collecting a “Loose Change Offering” that will be used to assist the Deacons with their utility assistance outreach program for Weirton residents or Cove Church members. We hope church members can help with the assistance program by donating some of their spare change. A container is placed in the Narthex each Sunday morning before church. The Deacons thank you for your continuing support of their projects.

PLEASE SUPPORT . . .
Cove Presbyterian Church’s Community Birthday Calendar. This will be our Seventh Annual Issue. All profits this year will be used for the current roof project. If you have any questions concerning listings or about the calendar project, please contact the church office. It’s a wonderful way to remember all your important dates! We are encouraging all members to participate! Listing deadline is Friday, July 8th.

VASES OF FLOWERS. . .
can be purchased for a service. The cost is $16.00 a vase. Silk flowers can be purchased for an additional cost. The flower calendar is located on the far wall in the church narthex or you can telephone the church office to place your order. After the service, the flowers will be placed in a plastic vase for you to take with you.

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS. . .
newsletters from old friends or articles about or by members of Cove Church, check out the bulletin board located in the hallway by the church offices. Past event pictures are also on display in that area.

WE’RE UPDATING OUR PRAYER AND DEVOTION LINE . . .
about four times a week. If you would like to call and hear a devotional, please call 304-748-7900.

SHOP ON LINE . . .
use Good Search and Good Shop search engines to find what you are hunting for. Just list Cove Presbyterian Church as your charity and a percent of your purchase will come back to the church. It’s a simple way to raise money for the Cove Deacons while shopping for yourself!

ONGOING MISSION PROJECTS . . .
• Used Can Tabs are being collected for the Ronald McDonald House in Morgantown, West Virginia. Deposit your tabs in the container located in the main hallway downstairs.
• Campbell’s Labels are being collected by the Presbyterian Women and can be dropped off in the container located in the main hallway downstairs. These labels are being collected for the Weirton Christian Center.