Monday, April 30, 2012

Sunday's Sermon - Because We’re Loved

1 John 3:16-24

16In this we know love, that this one,[Jesus Christ,] for our sake laid down his life. And we ourselves ought for the sake of the brothers lay down [our] lives. 17But if the one who might have the world’s goods and might see his brother who has a need and might shut his compassion from him, then how does God’s love remain in him?

18
Children, let us not love in word nor tongue but in work and in truth. 19And in this, we’ll know that from the truth we are, and in his presence we’ll persuade our hearts, 20because if the heart might condemn us, then greater is God then our hearts and he knows everything. 21Beloved, if hearts might not condemn us, then we have complete confidence from God 22and whatever we might ask, then we receive from him, because his commandments we keep and things that are pleasing in his sight, we do. 23And this is his commandment, that we might believe in the name of his son Jesus Christ and we might love one another, just as he gave the command to us. 24And the one who keeps his commands, in him, remains and he in them. And in this, we know that he remains in us, from the spirit which to us he sends.


Because We’re Loved

You know, it’s funny. Love can cause us to do some mighty stupid things. Take for instance, good old King Kong. When I was a kid, they had on one of the stations a show called "Chiller Theater" that used to show old monster movies. And I remember, my dad and I would watch it every week. I think it came on right after Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling. Any way, one of the best was of course King Kong, the story of the big gorilla that went ape over Fay Wray. (Get it, "ape over Fay Wray." And Debbie says I’m not as funny as I think I am.)

Of course, we all know the story. King Kong falls in love with Fay. And after they capture him and put him on stage in New York, he escapes, grabs Fay and climbs to the top of the Empire State Building. And I think we’ve all seen that scene where he’s kind of grabbing the top of the building with one hand and fighting off a bunch of bi-planes with the other. And the planes are shooting him, and he’s swatting them. And eventually, well, you know, the planes win. They get Kong, who falls off the building, slat onto the pavement below. But you know, instead of having monkey all over the Big Apple, King Kong keeps it together. And as they’re looking at his lifeless body, the police chef says something like, "We got him." And Carl Denham, the guy who captured Kong, and who shot a stegosaurus by the way, sort of shakes his head and says, "We didn’t get him. ‘Twas beauty killed the beast." Like I said, love can make us do some really dumb things.

And even though I’ve never known it drive anybody to the top of the Empire State Building, I do know a person who love caused to leave the city where she’d lived for forty years, I’m talking about the only place she ever knew, to move to a little, bitty town in Virginia because her husband got a job teaching in rural Buckingham County. And love caused this same person to pack up again, five years later, and say good-bye to her friends and head up to the northern panhandle of West Virginia. It was all because of love. And of course, I’m talking about Debbie. But I can tell you, I’m no stranger to the power of love myself. I know for me, love, and I’m talking about true love caused me to follow a team that just had two wins last year. Now that’s what I mean by love. And since I’m still in love, I’ll probably cheer for the Bronchos on opening day in spite of the abuse I know I’ll take. All because of love.

And since love can get us to do all kinds of things, I think it’s kind of interesting that that often doesn’t apply to God’s love for us. Of course it’s really not rocket science, and I’m talking about why people often don’t seem moved by God’s love for them. Now frankly, I think this is a little nuts, but I really understand the reason. I mean, as odd as it sounds, at least to me, I honestly believe that a lot of Christians don’t feel loved by God at all. For them, he’s nothing more than this task master, who’s almost looking for a excuse to drop folks into hell. And others, well, they’ve been taught that God loves only when we do something to deserve it, turning love into almost a wage that has to be earned. And still others, I guess you could say that for them it’s just not a big deal, one way or another. For some of them, I think they’d rather have a new television than the assurance of divine love. But you know, the reason doesn’t really matter. For some believers, the idea that they’re loved by the creator of the universe, well, it just doesn’t have much impact on their relationship with others, including other folks within the faith. And it doesn’t even shape their relationship with God.

And I’ve got to tell you, I think that’s a real shame, and not just because of how it affects others but also what it does to them. But you know, what’s saddest of all is that it’s so unnecessary, because the love of God can have an enormous impact on us, on how we relate to others and even how we relate to God. And this is something that I think we can see in the verses we just read, a passage in which John really dealt with love. But let me tell you what I’m talking about.

I mean, according to what he wrote here, this love business can sure influence our relationship with one another, and I’ll tell you why. You see, because we’re loved, we have an example of love to follow. And I’ll tell you, that’s what I think he was getting at when he wrote, "In this we know love, that this one,[Jesus Christ,] for our sake laid down his life. And we ourselves ought for the sake of the brothers lay down [our] lives. But if the one who might have the world’s goods and might see his brother who has a need and might shut his compassion from him, then how does God’s love remain in him?"

Now, to me, I think this is really cool. You see, we can look at how Christ ultimately showed love to us. Remember, Jesus himself said, "No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends." And you know, isn’t that exactly what he did. He laid down his life for his friends, for us. And you know, that’s the example I was talking about. That’s the example of love that we can follow.

Of course, let’s face it, if this is the standard, we’re probably not going to do it. I mean, give me a break. We may talk on and on about how we’ve given our life to Jesus, but let’s face, we can only say it because we’ve really never been asked to do it, not physically at least. We’ve never been forced to stop living because of Jesus Christ. And I’ve got to be honest, I don’t think I’d do it, not if a gun were up against my head or maybe worst, against Maggie’s. Giving your life is a mighty hard demand.

And maybe that’s why, in this passage, John softens it a little, by talking about giving your likelihood. In other words, although we may not be willing actually to give our lives, we sure can write a check when someone is in need. And we can sure take time out of our day when someone could use a visit. And we can sure show some kindness to a person whom we may not even know because it just might brighten their day. And although this may not be on the level of giving your life, it’s something that we might actually do. You see, because we’re loved by God, we have a perfect example of love that we can follow, one that can change our relationship with others. That’s the first thing this passage shows.

And second, we can also do something that will change our relationship with God. You see, because we’re loved, we have a reason to love others. Again, this is what John wrote, "Children, let us not love in word nor tongue but in work and in truth. And in this, we’ll know that from the truth we are, and in his presence we’ll persuade our hearts, because if the heart might condemn us, than greater is God then our hearts and he knows everything. Beloved, if hearts might not condemn us, then we have complete confidence from God and whatever we might ask, then we receive from him, because his commandments we keep and things that are pleasing in his sight, we do. And this is his commandment, that we might believe in the name of his son Jesus Christ and we might love one another, just as he gave the command to us. And the one who keeps his commands, in him, remains and he in them. And in this, we know that he remains in us, from the spirit which to us he sends." Now that’s what John wrote.

And I’ll tell you, it’s almost embarrassingly simple. We know that Christ loves us, right? We know it by what he said, and maybe more importantly, we know it by what he did. As a minister once told me, we’re going to have to live with the fact that God loves us. And you know, if this is something we know, I mean if this is something we believe right to the core of our being, then we’re going to want to respond. My goodness, unless we’re sort of deadbeats and don’t mind sponging off God, then we’re going to want to do something to express our thanks, right? I don’t know about you, but when I receive something that I haven’t worked for, something I didn’t earn, something I don’t even deserve, when I get a gift like that, I’m sure going to do something to say "thank you." And that’s exactly where we stand with God. And you know, if we want to know what to do, John tells us right here. He gives us the two-part command of Christ. One, if we want to say thanks, we can sure believe, in other words, we can sure trust that Christ is exactly who he said he was. And two, we can certainly love one another. And you know, not only will this be the perfect way to say think you, it will also show both the world and ourselves that Christ is in us and we’re in Christ. Remember, John wrote, "And the one who keeps his commands, in him, remains and he in them." You see, because we’re loved by God, we have a perfect reason to love others, one that reflects our relationship with God. That’s something else this passage shows.

Because he loved, King Kong was knocked off the Empire State Building. Because she loved, Debbie went with me to Virginia and then north of the Mason Dixon line, or as my mother calls it, the mission field. And for me, well, because I love, I’ll continue to bleed royal blue. Yes sir, love can cause us to do some pretty interesting things. And as it relates to the folks around us, our relationship with others can change when we follow the example of love left by Jesus. And as it relates to God, our relationship with him can be reflected when we claim the reason we have to love one another. And why are these possible? Simple, it’s all because we’re loved.

Saturday, April 28, 2012

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - Resting in the Shelter


Hebrews 4:1-10

1The promise to enter the place of rest is still good, and we must take care that none of you miss out. 2We have heard the message, just as they did. But they failed to believe what they heard, and the message did not do them any good. 3Only people who have faith will enter the place of rest. It is just as the Scriptures say,

   “God became angry
   and told the people,
   ‘You will never enter
   my place of rest!’”

God said this, even though everything has been ready from the time of creation. 4In fact, somewhere the Scriptures say that by the seventh day, God had finished his work, and so he rested. 5We also read that he later said, “You people will never enter my place of rest!” 6This means that the promise to enter is still good, because those who first heard about it disobeyed and did not enter. 7Much later God told David to make the promise again, just as I have already said,

   “If you hear his voice today,
   don’t be stubborn!”

8If Joshua had really given the people rest, there would not be any need for God to talk about another day of rest. 9But God has promised us a Sabbath when we will rest, even though it has not yet come. 10On that day God’s people will rest from their work, just as God rested from his work.


A Devotion by Susanna Chenoweth (Indiana)

Entering the grocery store, I see a small child who is having a toddler meltdown. He throws his arms and legs out, flopping to the floor, crying, beside the rack of grocery carts. His mother bends down to him and, speaking softly, picks him up and calmly turns toward the exit. As they pass, I overhear her telling him, “It’s all right. You’re tired. Let’s go home now.” As the child is soothed, his wailing recedes, and by the time they reach the door, his head is nestled peacefully against her neck. I think, What an understanding mother she is! Clearly she knows that the little one will be better behaved once he’s rested.

The compassionate mother reminds me of our heavenly Father who patiently provides us with rest when we’re out of sorts. We may not even realize we’re tired; but when we feel we cannot take another step, maybe we shouldn’t. Maybe we need to turn to the shelter of God’s loving arms and there find rest and peace.

Friday, April 27, 2012

What's Happening at Cove?

Below are the announcements as they appear in Sunday's bulletin.
  • OUR NURSERY FOR CHILDREN . . .
    (infant thru five years) is open during Sunday School and the Worship Service. We still need some volunteer help.  We thank those of you in advance who help to care for the future members of our Cove Family.
  • DON’T FORGET SUNDAY SCHOOL  . . .
    we meet every Sunday morning at 9:45 a.m.  Think about trying out one of our classes. We have a variety of classes to choose from to fit your needs.
  • OUR CHILDREN PRACTICE HANDBELLS . . .
    every Sunday morning at 10:30 a.m. in the old Youth Room.
  • BOOKMARKS . . .
    Cove’s Reading Group will meet on Monday, April 30 at 6:30 p.m. in the church parlor.
  • THE MYRTLE MCHENDRY CLASS MEETING . . .
    will be on Tuesday, May 1, 2012 at 12:30 p.m. in fellowship hall. It will be a Salad Smorgasbord and hostesses will be Eleanor Cline and Ruth Coates. Devotions by Rosalie Coxen.  The program The Joy of Spring will be presented by Jan Hicks owner of  McCauslen Any Occasion. If you plan to attend please bring a salad.
  • THE SESSION WILL MEET . . .
    Tuesday, May 1 at 6:30 p.m. in the board room.
  • BROWN BAG BIBLE STUDY . . .
    Thursday, May 3 at 12:30 p.m. in Fellowship Hall. During this session we’ll consider the faith of Christian Science.
  • THE PRESBYTERIAN WOMEN WILL HOST . . .
    the May Friendship Breakfast Celebration of Church Women United on Friday, May 4 at 10:00 a.m. in fellowship hall.  The theme will be “Sounds and Sights of Harmony”. During the program we will be invited to listen to our sisters and acknowledge  Church Women United history  as we take a look at biblical women who have shown similar characteristics in their friendships. The Friendship Day Project will be a collection for “The Lighthouse” an abuse center. Members are encouraged to bring clear and fragrant -free dish liquid and laundry detergent and fabric softeners both liquid and sheets. You are invited to come and enjoy breakfast and a morning of friendship with all our Church Women United friends.
  • THE MONTHLY MEETING OF THE DEACONS . . .
    will be held on Monday, May 7 at 7:00 p.m. in the board room.
  • THE PRESBYTERIAN WOMEN ARE COLLECTING CLEANING SUPPLIES . . .
    and party supplies to be sent to the Shack Neighborhood House in Pursglove, West Virginia near Morgantown. These items may include dish and laundry detergent, cleaners, soap, towels, sponges and wash cloths. Also, tablecloths and party supplies for their  school children’s summer activities. Hygiene items such as hand sanitizers, tissues and hand wipes may be included. The Shack is one of the Presbyterian mission projects supported by the Presbyterian Women. A box has been placed near Fellowship Hall for your donations.
  • AFTER APRIL 1 . . .
    please re-register or register your Kroger Card at Kroger Community Rewards and list Cove Presbyterian as your recipient. It costs you nothing, you loose no money or points and the church gets a quarterly payment based on what members spend. If you do not have a computer, just contact the church office and we will gladly set-up your account for you. It only takes a few minutes.   FYI. . .for the quarter of November to January we received a check for $ 203.24 with only 22 card holders participating. Imagine what the amount would be if ALL members participated!! To verify that you are registered, check the bottom of your receipt – it should read – You requested Kroger to donate to COVE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
  • PRAYER BOXES . . .
    please return your lenten prayer box to the basket on the table in the narthex.
  • BOARD MEMBERS . . .
    remember to check and empty your mailboxes periodically. Meeting minutes and other items of importance are often put into the boxes for your reference.
  • BULLETIN DEADLINE . . .
    if you wish to have an article published in the weekly bulletin, please have the article into the church office by Wednesday at noon. Thank you for your cooperation.
  • STOP IN THE CHURCH LIBRARY . . .
    to view a picture of Holiday’s Cove from 1905 showing a view of Cove Church.  The picture is compliments of the Weirton Museum.
  • DO YOU HAVE A NEW ADDRESS,. . .
    new phone number or new e-mail ? Please contact the church office so we can update our records. We like to keep everyone informed of our events.  If you don’t receive mailings from us,  we may not have your current/correct information.
  • REMINDER, PLEASE COVER  . . .
    the top of the church’s tables before they are used for any activity. They will stain and are hard to clean, this can be avoided with a little cooperation.
  • GREETERS NEEDED . . .
    if you would like to serve as a greeter before a Sunday morning worship service, please contact Bonnie Nichols at 304-723-5134.
  • WE ARE BLOGGING!
    We now have six blogs that you can check out for information and on which you can leave comments. They're listed below:
    • The Cove Community (www.thecovecommunity.blogspot.com) - This is for the whole church. I'll post sermons and announcements. I also invite y'all to send in material that you'd like to share with other members of the congregation. And please feel free to comment on anything you might read.
    • Cove Kids (www.covekids.blogspot.com) - This is tailored for the preteen young people in our church. Again I'll post announcements. You're also invited to send in any writings, photographs and art work you'd like to post. And they don't have to all deal with the church. We also post artwork from Jesus Time.
    • Glue (www.cove-glue.blogspot.com) - Our teens are running their own blog site; therefore, I have no idea what will be posted.
    • Bible Talk (www.cove-bibletalk.blogspot.com) - We've established this blog to give pastors and lay people the chance to discuss Scripture. The weekly passages are from the Common Lectionary, and we're posting the pastor’s translation of the  Greek text. We want you to read any or all of the passages and to leave any comment or ask any question that you feel is appropriate. Please include any research you've done. As we share our ideas and insights, we hope that we'll all come to a better and deeper understanding of the Bible. Each passage is linked to a website that offers some informative information.
    • Let’s Talk About It (www.cove-talk.blogspot.com) - Through this site, we hope to encourage a conversation on a variety of topics. Since this blog is sponsored by a church, we expect most of the issues to involve the Christian faith. Still we don't want to limit ourselves or you. If you have a topic that you'd like us to discuss, include it as a comment to a previous issue. Please phrase it as a question and offer a summary of at least two positions. We'll add a new item to discuss every three weeks. We hope this challenges you to apply your faith to issues that are important to you.
    • The Bible in a Year (www.cove-bibleinayear.blogspot.com) - Each day, we'll post passages so that you can read the Bible in one year.  
  • IT IS OFTEN DIFFICULT TO HEAR PRAYER REQUESTS . . .
    on Sunday mornings. If you would like to have someone added to the prayer chain please drop a short note into the collection plate with their name and any other information you would like to share.  You may also call the church office or e-mail the church with the information. 
  • IF YOU LEAVE AN ITEM AT  CHURCH . . .
    for someone or for a specific function, please take a moment to write the information on the item.  If there is no name on the item we will assume it is for the church in general.
  • IN THE HOSPITAL? HOMEBOUND? RECENT ILLNESS?. . .
    if you are unable to attend services and would like to arrange for a visit from  Rev. Ed Rudiger please contact the church office. Also if you would like to be included in our weekly bulletin  mailings contact the church office.
  • WE CAN ALWAYS DO A BETTER JOB MINISTERING . . .
    to the needs within this congregation, community and world. Please feel free to offer any suggestions as comments.
  • LOOSE CHANGE OFFERING . . .
    Session approved the Deacons collecting a “Loose Change Offering” that will be used to assist the Deacons with their utility assistance outreach program for Weirton residents or Cove Church members. We hope church members can help with the assistance program by donating some of their spare change. A container is placed in the Narthex each Sunday morning before church. The Deacons thank you for your continuing support of their projects.
  • VASES OF FLOWERS. . .
    can be purchased for a service. The cost is  $16.00 a vase.  Silk flowers or live plants can be purchased for an additional cost. The  flower calendar is located on the far wall in the church narthex or you can telephone the church office to place your order. After the service, the flowers will be placed in a plastic vase for you to take with you. 
  • IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS. . .
    newsletters from old friends  or articles about or by members of Cove Church,  check out the  bulletin board located in the hallway by the church offices.  Past event pictures are also on display in that area.
  • WE’RE UPDATING OUR PRAYER AND DEVOTION LINE . . .
    about four times a week. If you would like to call and hear a devotional, please call 304-748-7900.
  • ONGOING MISSION PROJECTS . . .
    • Used Can Tabs are being collected for the Ronald McDonald House in Morgantown, West Virginia. Deposit your tabs in the container located in the main hallway downstairs.
    • Campbell’s Labels are being collected by the Presbyterian Women for the Weirton Christian Center.  The labels including the bar code or just the bar code can be dropped off in the container located in the main  hallway downstairs.
    • Greeting Cards are being collected. Please drop off your Greeting Cards or just the front of the card in the box located in the main hallway downstairs. The cards are being sent to St. Jude’s  Ranch to be remade into cards to be sold in their gift shop.  Hallmark, Disney or American Greeting Cards can not be accepted as they are trade marked.
    We thank you for your participation and support of our mission endeavors.

National Day of Prayer - Thursday, May 3, 2012


On Thursday, May 3, people of faith will unite in prayer. National Day of Prayer calls on all people of different faiths in the United States to pray for the nation and its leaders. It is held on the first Thursday of May each year. Below is some information about this important day, and the proclamation issued by President Obama last year.
There had been at least two individual (i.e. single-day) national days of prayer in U.S. history before the day was made an official annual day of observance in 1952. Prior to the nation's founding, the Continental Congress issued a proclamation recommending "a day of publick [sic] humiliation, fasting, and prayer" be observed on July 20, 1775":
The Honorable the Congress having recommended it to the United States to set apart Thursday the 6th of May next to be observed as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, to acknowledge the gracious interpositions of Providence; to deprecate [to pray or intreat that a present evil may be removed] deserved punishment for our Sins and Ingratitiude, to unitedly implore the Protection of Heaven; Success to our Arms and the Arms of our Ally: The Commander in Chief enjoins a religious observance of said day and directs the Chaplains to prepare discourses proper for the occasion; strictly forbidding all recreations and unnecessary labor.” —George Washington, First President of the United States
During the Quasi-War with France, President John Adams declared May 9, 1798 as "a day of solemn humility, fasting, and prayer," during which citizens of all faiths were asked to pray "that our country may be protected from all the dangers which threaten it".[10] On March 30, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation expressing the idea "that the awful calamity of civil war, which now desolates the land, may be but a punishment, inflicted upon us, for our presumptuous sins", and designated the day of April 30, 1863 as a day of "national humiliation, fasting and prayer" in the hope that God would respond by restoring "our now divided and suffering Country, to its former happy condition of unity and peace". He went on to say, "...it is the duty of nations as well as of men, to own their dependence upon the overruling power of God, to confess their sins and transgressions, in humble sorrow, yet with assured hope that genuine repentance will lead to mercy and pardon; and to recognize the sublime truth, announced in the Holy Scriptures and proven by all history, that those nations only are blessed whose God is the Lord."
A Senate report incorrectly claims as part of the rationale for the law that prayers were conducted at the Constitutional Convention, which adopted the U.S. Constitution: “When the delegates to the Constitutional Convention encountered difficulties in the writing and formation of a Constitution for this Nation, prayer was suggested and became an established practice at succeeding sessions,” according to the report by the Committee on the Judiciary.
On April 17, 1952, President Harry S. Truman signed a bill proclaiming a National Day of Prayer must be declared by each following president at an appropriate date of his choice. In 1982 a conservative evangelical Christian organization called the "National Prayer Committee" was formed to coordinate and implement a fixed annual day of prayer for the purpose of organizing evangelical Christian prayer events with local, state, and federal government entities. In his 1983 declaration, Ronald Reagan said, "From General Washington's struggle at Valley Forge to the present, this Nation has fervently sought and received divine guidance as it pursued the course of history. This occasion provides our Nation with an opportunity to further recognize the source of our blessings, and to seek His help for the challenges we face today and in the future."
In 1988, the law was amended so that the National Day of Prayer would be held on the first Thursday of May. Two stated intentions of the National Day of Prayer were that it would be a day when adherents of all great religions could unite in prayer and that it may one day bring renewed respect for God to all the peoples of the world.
More recently, the idea of an annual National Day of Prayer was introduced by the Rev. Billy Graham, who suggested it in the midst of a several-weeks crusade in the nation’s capitol. Members of the House and Senate introduced a joint resolution for an annual National Day of Prayer, "on which the people of the United States may turn to God in prayer and meditation at churches, in groups, and as individuals."

THE WHITE HOUSE
NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER, 2011
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
A PROCLAMATION011 NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER PROCLAMATION

From the President of the United States

2011 NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER PROCLAMATION

Throughout our history, Americans have turned to prayer for strength, inspiration, and solidarity.
Prayer has played an important role in the American story and in shaping our Nation’s leaders.  President Abraham Lincoln once said, “I have been driven many times upon my knees by the overwhelming conviction that I had nowhere else to go.  My own wisdom and that of all about me seemed insufficient for the day.”  The late Coretta Scott King recounted a particularly difficult night, during the Montgomery bus boycott, when her husband, the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., received a threatening phone call and prayed at the kitchen table, saying, “Lord, I have nothing left.  I have nothing left.  I have come to the point where I can’t face it alone.”  Dr. King said, in that moment of prayer, he was filled with a sense of comfort and resolve, which his wife credited as a turning point in the civil rights movement.
It is thus fitting that, from the earliest years of our country’s history, Congress and Presidents have set aside days to recognize the role prayer has played in so many definitive moments in our history.  On this National Day of Prayer, let us follow the example of President Lincoln and Dr. King.  Let us be thankful for the liberty that allows people of all faiths to worship or not worship according to the dictates of their conscience, and let us be thankful for the many other freedoms and blessings that we often take for granted.
Let us pray for the men and women of our Armed Forces and the many selfless sacrifices they and their families make on behalf of our Nation.  Let us pray for the police officers, firefighters, and other first responders who put themselves in harm’s way every day to protect their fellow citizens.  And let us ask God for the sustenance and guidance for all of us to meet the great challenges we face as a Nation.
Let us remember in our thoughts and prayers those who have been affected by natural disasters at home and abroad in recent months, as well as those working tirelessly to render assistance.  And, at a time when many around the world face uncertainty and unrest, but also hold resurgent hope for freedom and justice, let our prayers be with men and women everywhere who seek peace, human dignity, and the same rights we treasure here in America.
The Congress, by Public Law 100-307, as amended, has called on the President to issue each year a proclamation designating the first Thursday in May as a “National Day of Prayer.”
NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim May 5, 2011, as a National Day of Prayer.  I invite all citizens of our Nation, as their own faith or conscience directs them, to join me in giving thanks for the many blessings we enjoy, and I ask all people of faith to join me in asking God for guidance, mercy, and protection for our Nation.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twenty-ninth day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand eleven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth.
BARACK OBAMA

Prayer Requests, to be shared during Sunday's worship service


On Sunday, April 29, the Cove Presbyterian congregation will lift the following needs to God:


Adults
Alden Edwards
Andrea Vincent
Andy DiRemigio
Ann Berach
Anthony Calpo
Beverly Zeff
Bob Saffle
Bobby Leonard
Boipelo Mooketsi
Charles Saffle
Christy Cybulski
Connie Francis
Dave Bever
Diane Szymanek
Domenick Notarantanio 
Don & Greta Billham
Doug Friends
Dryer family - Meyer, Welch & Hawkins
Ed Roach
Erin Lippert
Jan Moncrief
Jane Hamp
Jennifer Dahlem
Jim Hanna
Joan Gallagher
Joanne Westbrook
John Brothers
Judy Dobbins
Judy Lindquist
Judy Mason
Karen & her son Daniel
Katy Allen
Kelly Stephens
Ken Robinson
Lindsey Ward
Michelle Hano
Millie Randolph
Mr. & Mrs. Mario Whitehead & Joyce
Nick Palavis
Nora Coleman
Patty Neely
Paul Maine
Paul Rosnick
Penny Mourat
Phil Lanyon
Rachael
Rhonda Bruich
Rich Jeffers
Richard Redfern 
Ron Sekersky
Roxie Sosenko
Sherry VanGilder
Susan Ponville
T.J. Croft
Trina Lewis
Virginia & Paul Welch

Children
Aksel Ace
Audri King
Brandon Wares
Brody McUmor
Emily Icard
Hunter Stafford
Jeffrey Konovich
Jonah Becker
Justus Loughry
Kya Schwertfeger
Kylee Leathers
McKenna Popish
Michael Liptak
Shelby Kamarec
Zoe Purcell

Military
Chris Cameron
Jonathan Criss
Kendra Mader
Michael Criss
Stephen Mader 

Bereaved Family
The Family of Ken Robinson

Church Families
Rosalie Coxen
Gary & Sandy Crawford
Criss Family, Roger, Patty, Ben, Jonathan, Michael & family


Local Congregation
Resurrection Lutheran Church

Special Friend
Ila Mauk -  1234 Swearingen Rd, Weirton, WV  26062-4331

Presbyterian Churches and Organizations

Mission Outreach Committee, Ruling Elder Connie Quinn, chairperson
New Church Development Committee, Rev. Dr. Larry Kline, chairperson

Also Remember in Your Prayers
Alice Orr - Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Bob Morgan - Weirton Geriatric Center, 2526 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Harry Hutch - Brightwood
Jim Hanna - Weirton Geriatric Center, 2526 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Marge Black - Weirton Geriatric Center, Room 223, 2528 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Mike Valiga - Weirton Geriatric Center, 2530 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Thelma Longacre - Chambrel at Montrose, Unit 210, 100 Brookmont Rd, Akron, OH 44333-3091

Thursday, April 26, 2012

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - Our Strength


John 14:15-27 (The Message)

15-17 “If you love me, show it by doing what I’ve told you. I will talk to the Father, and he’ll provide you another Friend so that you will always have someone with you. This Friend is the Spirit of Truth. The godless world can’t take him in because it doesn’t have eyes to see him, doesn’t know what to look for. But you know him already because he has been staying with you, and will even be in you!

 18-20 “I will not leave you orphaned. I’m coming back. In just a little while the world will no longer see me, but you’re going to see me because I am alive and you’re about to come alive. At that moment you will know absolutely that I’m in my Father, and you’re in me, and I’m in you.

 21 “The person who knows my commandments and keeps them, that’s who loves me. And the person who loves me will be loved by my Father, and I will love him and make myself plain to him.”

 22 Judas (not Iscariot) said, “Master, why is it that you are about to make yourself plain to us but not to the world?”

 23-24 “Because a loveless world,” said Jesus, “is a sightless world. If anyone loves me, he will carefully keep my word and my Father will love him—we’ll move right into the neighborhood! Not loving me means not keeping my words. The message you are hearing isn’t mine. It’s the message of the Father who sent me.

 25-27 “I’m telling you these things while I’m still living with you. The Friend, the Holy Spirit whom the Father will send at my request, will make everything plain to you. He will remind you of all the things I have told you. I’m leaving you well and whole. That’s my parting gift to you. Peace. I don’t leave you the way you’re used to being left—feeling abandoned, bereft. So don’t be upset. Don’t be distraught.”


A Devotion by James Ernest Sundara (Tennessee) 

When I was in my early teens, I had to undergo minor surgery. The night before the surgery I was afraid and could not sleep. When my dad visited me in the hospital the next morning, I broke down in tears. But he comforted me, gave me a Bible, and asked me to read the 14th chapter of John’s Gospel.

Jesus spoke these words to the disciples on their last night together. They did not understand him; but later when they faced trials and persecution, they remembered his reassuring words and became bold and strong in their faith.

As I read Jesus’ words, peace flooded my heart; my fear left me. I realized that God was with me. I was able to entrust the surgery into God’s hands, and I went confidently into the operating room. The procedure went well, and I recovered completely. To this day that chapter in John is my favorite. In every difficult situation in life, I have found peace and strength in those words of Jesus.

Minute for Mission - Medical Benevolence Foundation


A man and three children
Beloved children of God attend the church
atop LaGonave Island, Haiti. Photo by MBF Staff.
 

In John 10:11, Jesus talks about his role as the good shepherd who can be trusted to care because he is not a hired hand. As the shepherd, he is in fact prepared to lay down his life for the sheep God has given into his care.

The Medical Benevolence Foundation is Presbyterians like you helping people with the greatest needs and the least access to quality medical care. We choose to do this mission with church partners in other lands whom God has called to be the incarnational presence of Christ - the body of Christ in that place. God has given those churches the responsibility to care for God's people - the sheep of that place.

As we talk and work with our partner churches, we see their deep passion and love for the people. We see their sacrificial struggles to serve and care for them. These are the "sheep'' they know by name and who know their voice. They are "Rudalfo'' and ``Malida'' and "Ngoei'' and "Salim'' and "Bridget'' and "Bela'' and "Aliamma.''

At MBF, we consider it a high privilege to take and leverage resources entrusted to us to strengthen and empower that church partner's loving and compassionate ministry. Partners are not hirelings who work for us or for the donors who give through us - they are the shepherds entrusted by God with a holy task of care for people - body, mind, and soul. We thank God for these partners for, in their work, we see a profound Christian witness in word and loving care for those most neglected and marginalized.

- The staff of the Medical Benevolence Foundation

Monday, April 23, 2012

Sunday's Sermon - A Family Resemblance

1 John 3:1–7

1See what sort of love the Father has given to us, so that children of God we might be called and we’ll be. For this reason the world doesn’t know you, because it didn’t know him. 2Beloved, now we are children of God, and it hasn’t been revealed what we will be. We know that if it might be revealed, then like him we will be, because we will see him just as he is.

3And all who have this hope in him purify themselves, just as this one is pure. 4All who commit sins, also lawlessness they commit, and sin is lawlessness. 5And you know that this one was revealed, so that sins he might take away and in him there are no sins. 6All who remain in him don’t sin. All who sin don’t see him nor know him. 7Children, let no one mislead you. The one who does what is righteous is righteous, just as this one is righteous.


A Family Resemblance
I think the picture on the cover of the bulletin is pretty neat, because it’s really not a picture. Actually, it’s two. You see, this Canadian photographer, Ulric Collette came up with what is probably the coolest family photo shoot idea ever. You see, he started a series of what he calls ‘Genetic Portraits.’ He takes half the face of one person and matches it with half from another family member. For example, a son may be on one side and his father on the other. Now, the one on the cover is actually Ulric on the right and his cousin Justine to the left. Of course, there’s a whole series of pictures, and you know, what’s really interesting is that, even though some of the portraits are truly frightening, some of the new combined faces look pretty normal. As a matter of fact, in the one with Ulric and his brother, it’s really hard to see the difference. But you know, even when they’re kind of frightening, you can still see a family resemblance.

Because, for good or for bad, that just plain happens in families. I know it does in mine. I mean, from the time she was born, Debbie and I have been looking at Maggie, and we’ve wondered how she resembles each of us now and how that might change as she moves into the future. For example, she has my eyes, because they’re brown and near-sighted and her mother’s skin, eczema and all. Frankly, we’re all three praying that she ends up with her mother’s looks because we’d like to see her get married some day. And I know for a fact, that she’s praying that she some how avoids both of our hair, her mother’s hair color and my hair line. What can I say? But you know, it doesn’t just apply to how she looks. We think about which of us she resembles psychologically, sadly she’s pretty emotionally just like her father, and intellectually. And I’ll tell you, I sure hope to see some of us in her values and her work-ethic and her life-style. And you know, we probably won’t be too disappointed, because even though we might have to endure all kinds of stuff during her teens, when push comes to shove, she’ll probably end up a lot like us, because what do they say, the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. You see, whether it’s caused by nature or nurture, when it comes to parents and their children, there’s usually a family resemblance.

And you know, I think that applies to us as Christians as well. I think spiritually, there should also be a family resemblance, but not necessarily with our biological parents or emotional parental figures. No, as men and women who’ve been called and confirmed by God, I think there should be some resemblance between us and our spiritual family, and in particular, between us and God, our father, and between us and our brother Jesus Christ.

And I’ll tell you, I really think that’s what John is sort of getting at in the verses we just read. I mean, just think about what he wrote in the first half of the passage. According to John, we are the children of God. Remember, he wrote, "See what sort of love the Father has given to us, so that children of God we might be called and we’ll be. For this reason the world doesn’t know you, because it didn’t know him. Beloved, now we are children of God, and it hasn’t been revealed what we will be. We know that if it might be revealed, then like him we will be, because we will see him just as he is."

Now that’s what he wrote, and I want you to think about what it means. What did he say? We are the children of God. This is something God has done within us. And although that certainly involves who we are, it’s so much more than just a way to define our identity. You see, we’re not just called the children of God, as though this is some kind of lapel that’s been stamped on us. No, rather we are God’s own children, because we’ve been changed. Remember last week, we talked about the paraklete, something that Jesus called the Holy Spirit and John said was Jesus Christ himself, and guess what, because we believe in the Trinity, they’re both right.

You see, without our permission or our help, the very presence of the Almighty and All-Loving God has entered us, and we’ve been changed. As Christ said to Nicodemus, we’ve been born again and born from above. And into us flowed a reality that not only taught us all things and reminded us of everything Christ said, it also brought peace, but not the kind of peace offered by the world, no, instead the kind that can settle troubled hearts and still all our fears. That’s what God has already accomplished. It’s a done deal.

But even more important than that, as part of our adoption or maybe better, our incorporation into the family, we’ve been made a part of Christ himself. Remember how Jesus said, "I am the vine, you are the branches. Those who abide in me and I in them bear much fruit, because apart from me you can do nothing." Now, just think about what this means; we’re not just helped by the vine or informed about the vine or even told to follow the example of the vine. Man, we’re part of the vine, part of Christ. By the power of God, we are now in him and he’s in us, and I’ll tell you, that’s huge. Just listen to what Paul wrote to the Romans, "We know that our old self was crucified with him so that the body of sin might be destroyed, and we might no longer be enslaved to sin. For whoever has died is freed from sin." On that cross we died with Christ; we are dead with respect to sin, but that’s not all. Paul continued in this same passage: "But if we have died with Christ, we believe that we will also live with him. We know that Christ, being raised from the dead, will never die again; death no longer has dominion over him. The death he died, he died to sin, once for all; but the life he lives, he lives to God. So you also must consider yourselves dead to sin and alive to God in Christ Jesus."

You see, this is what it means to be the children of God, freedom as we look at the past and hope as we move into the future. And it’s all because of what God has done and is doing within us. And you know, what’s really exciting is that he’s not finished yet; we’re still becoming. Remember, John wrote, "...now we are children of God, and it hasn’t been revealed what we will be. We know that if it might be revealed, then like him we will be, because we will see him just as he is." Like the hymn says, "I’m so glad I’m a part of the family of God–I’ve been washed in the fountain, cleansed by His blood! Joint heirs with Jesus as we travel this sod, for I’m part of the family, the family of God." You see, that’s exactly who we are, the children of God.

And right here this stuff about a family resemblance comes in, because if we believe, I mean really believe that we are the children of God, it just stands to reason that our lives should more and more resemble the life of Christ. And I think that’s what John was getting at when he wrote, "And all who have this hope in him purify themselves, just as this one is pure. All who commit sins, also lawlessness they commit, and sin is lawlessness. And you know that this one was revealed, so that sins he might take away and in him there are no sins. All who remain in him don’t sin. All who sin don’t see him nor know him. Children, let no one mislead you. The one who does what is righteous is righteous, just as this one is righteous."

You see, since we’ve been made the children of God, we’re the brothers and sisters of Christ. And because we’re now related to him through the Holy Spirit, it might be a good idea to start living more like Jesus. In other words, we might want to purify ourselves, a word that in his gospel, John used to describe what the Jews did before celebrating Passover. And so, we might want to prepare ourselves to live in the same way Jesus prepared himself.

And to make it really easy for us, John mentioned two things we can do. First, we can simply stop sinning. In other words, we can stop doing all those naughty things that are condemned in the law,

because when you get right down to it, for John, that’s exactly what sin is. It’s lawlessness. Of course, for Paul it was a lot more than that, but not in John’s gospel or his letters. For John, sin involved violating the law. And you know, that’s something that we can avoid doing. For example, give me a break, I think everybody here can decide that they’re not going to break any of the ten commandments today, right? I mean, for the next twenty-four hours, I think we’ll be able to worship one God and avoid idols. And we can avoid using the name of God as a way to control him and we can sure keep the sabbath holy. And parental honoring is certainly possible and I don’t think there’s a person here this morning who is going to be forced to murder and lie, to steal and to commit adultery. Man, if we put our minds to it, we might even be able to cut back on the coveting. In other words, as the children of God, we can live as though there are laws that we’re just going to follow, because Jesus did. Now that’s one thing we can do.

But second, we can also work to do as many things that are right as we possibly can. And I’ll tell you, for John, that’s what "righteousness" was all about, doing the right and appropriate thing. Therefore, living as children isn’t just about what we shouldn’t do; it’s also about showing love to those around us, even those we don’t like. It’s about feeding the hungry and giving something to drink to thirsty. It’s about clothing the naked and sheltering the homeless. It’s about comforting the sick and announcing release to the captives. In other words, it’s about doing the same kind of things Jesus did. And I’ll tell you, we’re doing it not because those we help deserve it or because we’re going get something out of it. No sir, we’re loving our God. We’re loving our neighbor. My goodness, we’re loving one another because that’s the right thing to do. That’s just how the children of God are suppose to live.

You know, when you look at those pictures by Ulric Collette, you can’t help but see similarities between the two sides. And with Maggie, Debbie and I can see a lot of ourselves in her, poor child. And as children ourselves, and I’m talking about as children of God, maybe we should work some of the traits of our brother Jesus Christ into our lives, into both our words and actions. And you know something, if we do, as those who are loved by God but who just don’t know it yet, as they look at us, children of God, I think they just might see a strong family resemblance.

Sunday, April 22, 2012

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - Increase the Harvest


John 15:1-8

1-3 “I am the Real Vine and my Father is the Farmer. He cuts off every branch of me that doesn’t bear grapes. And every branch that is grape-bearing he prunes back so it will bear even more. You are already pruned back by the message I have spoken.

4 “Live in me. Make your home in me just as I do in you. In the same way that a branch can’t bear grapes by itself but only by being joined to the vine, you can’t bear fruit unless you are joined with me.

5-8 “I am the Vine, you are the branches. When you’re joined with me and I with you, the relation intimate and organic, the harvest is sure to be abundant. Separated, you can’t produce a thing. Anyone who separates from me is deadwood, gathered up and thrown on the bonfire. But if you make yourselves at home with me and my words are at home in you, you can be sure that whatever you ask will be listened to and acted upon. This is how my Father shows who he is—when you produce grapes, when you mature as my disciples.


A Devotion by Raymond N. Hawkins (Tasmania, Australia)

Compared to my neighbor’s, my tomato vines were measly and struggling. Why? We planted similar seedlings in the same soil, experiencing the same rain and sun. Why was the fruit produced vastly different?

Eventually, I figured it out. After I harvested previous crops, I failed to replenish the soil with fertilizer and nutrients the way my neighbor had. As a result, my vines were barely producing while his produced enough for his family’s use and also to give away to others.

The lesson I learned can also be applied to my spiritual life. When I constantly try to produce the fruit of faith without replenishing my spirit’s soil, the result is fewer and smaller fruit.

The Lord provides nutrients for my spirit in the Bible, through prayer, and in Christian community, but I’m the one who has to work it into the sod of my soul. The results are rich spiritual soil. As the biblical writer Jude emphasizes, “Beloved, build yourselves up on your most holy faith, pray in the Holy Spirit” (v. 20, NRSV).

Friday, April 20, 2012

What's Happening at Cove


Below are the announcements as they appear in Sunday's bulletin.

DON’T FORGET SUNDAY SCHOOL  . . .
we meet every Sunday morning at 9:45 a.m.  Think about trying out one of our classes. We have a variety of classes to choose from to fit your needs.

OUR CHILDREN PRACTICE HANDBELLS . . .
every Sunday morning at 10:30 a.m. in the old Youth Room.

THERE WILL BE A STEEL WORKERS MEMORIAL SERVICE . . .
on Thursday, April 26 beginning at 9:00 a.m. at the Steel Workers  Memorial located at the intersection of Main Street and County Road. The tolling of the bell to honor the deceased workers will be done by Becky Korosec, Linda Caleffie and Joe Korosec.

BROWN BAG BIBLE STUDY . . .
Thursday, April 26 at 12:30 p.m. in Fellowship Hall. During this session we’ll consider the faith of Jehovah Witnesses.

BOOKMARKS . . .
Cove’s Reading Group will meet on Monday, April 30 at 6:30 p.m. in the church parlor.

THE MYRTLE MCHENDRY CLASS MEETING . . .
will be on Tuesday, May 1, 2012 at 12:30 p.m. in fellowship hall. It will be a Salad Smorgasbord and hostesses will be Eleanor Cline and Ruth Coates. Devotions by Rosalie Coxen.  The program The Joy of Spring will be presented by Jan Hicks owner of  McCauslen Any Occasion. If you plan to attend please bring a salad.

THE PRESBYTERIAN WOMEN ARE COLLECTING CLEANING SUPPLIES . . .
and party supplies to be sent to the Shack Neighborhood House in Pursglove, West Virginia near Morgantown. These items may include dish and laundry detergent, cleaners, soap, towels, sponges and wash cloths. Also, tablecloths and party supplies for their  school children’s summer activities. Hygiene items such as hand sanitizers, tissues and hand wipes may be included. The Shack is one of the Presbyterian mission projects supported by the Presbyterian Women. A box has been placed near Fellowship Hall for your convenience.

IF YOU HAD YOUR EASTER PICTURE TAKEN . . .
they are ready for pick-up on the table in the church parlor.

AFTER APRIL 1 . . .
please re-register or register your Kroger Card at Kroger Community Rewards and list Cove Presbyterian as your recipient. It costs you nothing, you loose no money or points and the church gets a quarterly payment based on what members spend. If you do not have a computer, just contact the church office and we will gladly set-up your account for you. It only takes a few minutes.   FYI. . .for the quarter of November to January we received a check for $ 203.24 with only 22 card holders participating. Imagine what the amount would be if ALL members participated!! To verify that you are registered, check the bottom of your receipt – it should read – You requested Kroger to donate to COVE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

PRAYER BOXES . . .
please return your lenten prayer box to the basket on the table in the narthex.

BOARD MEMBERS . . .
remember to check and empty your mailboxes periodically. Meeting minutes and other items of importance are often put into the boxes for your reference.

BULLETIN DEADLINE . . .
if you wish to have an article published in the weekly bulletin, please have the article into the church office by Wednesday at noon. Thank you for your cooperation. STOP IN THE CHURCH LIBRARY . . .
to view a picture of Holiday’s Cove from 1905 showing a view of Cove Church.  The picture is compliments of the Weirton Museum.

DO YOU HAVE A NEW ADDRESS,. . .
new phone number or new e-mail ? Please contact the church office so we can update our records. We like to keep everyone informed of our events.  If you don’t receive mailings from us,  we may not have your current/correct information.

REMINDER, PLEASE COVER  . . .
the top of the church’s tables before they are used for any activity. They will stain and are hard to clean, this can be avoided with a little cooperation.

GREETERS NEEDED . . .
if you would like to serve as a greeter before a Sunday morning worship service, please contact Bonnie Nichols at 304-723-5134.

WE ARE BLOGGING!
We now have six blogs that you can check out for information and on which you can leave comments. They're listed below:
• The Cove Community (www.thecovecommunity.blogspot.com) - This is for the whole church. I'll post sermons and announcements. I also invite y'all to send in material that you'd like to share with other members of the congregation. And please feel free to comment on anything you might read.
• Cove Kids (www.covekids.blogspot.com) - This is tailored for the preteen young people in our church. Again I'll post announcements. You're also invited to send in any writings, photographs and art work you'd like to post. And they don't have to all deal with the church. We also post artwork from Jesus Time.
• Glue (www.cove-glue.blogspot.com) - Our teens are running their own blog site; therefore, I have no idea what will be posted.
• Bible Talk (www.cove-bibletalk.blogspot.com) - We've established this blog to give pastors and lay people the chance to discuss Scripture. The weekly passages are from the Common Lectionary, and we're posting the pastor’s translation of the  Greek text. We want you to read any or all of the passages and to leave any comment or ask any question that you feel is appropriate. Please include any research you've done. As we share our ideas and insights, we hope that we'll all come to a better and deeper understanding of the Bible. Each passage is linked to a website that offers some informative information.
• Let’s Talk About It (www.cove-talk.blogspot.com) - Through this site, we hope to encourage a conversation on a variety of topics. Since this blog is sponsored by a church, we expect most of the issues to involve the Christian faith. Still we don't want to limit ourselves or you. If you have a topic that you'd like us to discuss, include it as a comment to a previous issue. Please phrase it as a question and offer a summary of at least two positions. We'll add a new item to discuss every three weeks. We hope this challenges you to apply your faith to issues that are important to you.
• The Bible in a Year (www.cove-bibleinayear.blogspot.com) - Each day, we'll post passages so that you can read the Bible in one year.

IT IS OFTEN DIFFICULT TO HEAR PRAYER REQUESTS . . .
on Sunday mornings. If you would like to have someone added to the prayer chain please drop a short note into the collection plate with their name and any other information you would like to share.  You may also call the church office or e-mail the church with the information.

IF YOU LEAVE AN ITEM AT  CHURCH . . .
for someone or for a specific function, please take a moment to write the information on the item.  If there is no name on the item we will assume it is for the church in general.

IN THE HOSPITAL? HOMEBOUND? RECENT ILLNESS?. . .
if you are unable to attend services and would like to arrange for a visit from  Rev. Ed Rudiger please contact the church office. Also if you would like to be included in our weekly bulletin  mailings contact the church office.

WE CAN ALWAYS DO A BETTER JOB MINISTERING . . .
to the needs within this congregation, community and world. Please feel free to offer any suggestions as comments.

LOOSE CHANGE OFFERING . . .
Session approved the Deacons collecting a “Loose Change Offering” that will be used to assist the Deacons with their utility assistance outreach program for Weirton residents or Cove Church members. We hope church members can help with the assistance program by donating some of their spare change. A container is placed in the Narthex each Sunday morning before church. The Deacons thank you for your continuing support of their projects.

VASES OF FLOWERS. . .
can be purchased for a service. The cost is  $16.00 a vase.  Silk flowers or live plants can be purchased for an additional cost. The  flower calendar is located on the far wall in the church narthex or you can telephone the church office to place your order. After the service, the flowers will be placed in a plastic vase for you to take with you.

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS. . .
newsletters from old friends  or articles about or by members of Cove Church,  check out the  bulletin board located in the hallway by the church offices.  Past event pictures are also on display in that area.

WE’RE UPDATING OUR PRAYER AND DEVOTION LINE . . .
about four times a week. If you would like to call and hear a devotional, please call 304-748-7900.

ONGOING MISSION PROJECTS . . .
• Used Can Tabs are being collected for the Ronald McDonald House in Morgantown, West Virginia. Deposit your tabs in the container located in the main hallway downstairs.
• Campbell’s Labels are being collected by the Presbyterian Women for the Weirton Christian Center.  The labels including the bar code or just the bar code can be dropped off in the container located in the main  hallway downstairs.
• Greeting Cards are being collected. Please drop off your Greeting Cards or just the front of the card in the box located in the main hallway downstairs. The cards are being sent to St. Jude’s  Ranch to be remade into cards to be sold in their gift shop.  Hallmark, Disney or American Greeting Cards can not be accepted as they are trade marked.
We thank you for your participation and support of our mission endeavors.


The Importance of Christian Courtesy


Recently, I've had some rather heated discussions with several believers, and as we talked, the conversation shifted from a discussion to a debate. Now as this happened, I noticed three things occurring. First, the words used became more and more harsh. It seemed as though kindness and common courtesy was replaced by sarcasm. Second, it seemed as though mutual understanding was replaced by trying to "win points." The goal stopped being communication and became an effort to keep the other person off balance and hitting him with a comment he couldn't see coming. Winning was more important than understanding. And third, I found myself drawn into the debate, and for me, this was very embarrassing. Although, at the beginning, I think I was trying to understand, it didn't take long for me to become just as sarcastic and combative as the other guys. I guess you could say, it brought out the worst in me.
 
But I think we all know this is a trap into which we can all fall. I mean, whether we're talking to a member of our family or a person at work who gets on our nerves, I think it's easy to do the same thing I did, to stop discussing and to start debating. Of course, when that happens, we generally also stop listening or caring whether we understand the other person or not. And although this is no good anywhere, it's particularly destructive when it happens among Christians. Whether we like it or not, everything we say and do is bearing witness to the God we worship, and the people around us will judge our faith based on our words and actions. Now, what impression are we making with people for whom Christ died when we can't even treat our family and friends, our brothers and sisters with respect and kindness? For the sake of our witness, let's make the decision to treat one another as Christ has treated us, and even when we disagree, to talk with one another in a way that brings glory to God and not attention to ourselves.
 
In fact, maybe we might reach the point envisioned in this little poem by Tia Maria:
Love & kindness have a way
of brightening up the darkest day
And when your soft words I hear
you chase away my inner fear

When you whisper my name
I can feel you hold me tight
And when I have a bad day
you still do make it right

Prayer Requests, to be shared during Sunday's worship service


On Sunday, April 22, the Cove Presbyterian congregation will lift the following needs to God:

Adults
Alden Edwards
Andrea Vincent
Andy DiRemigio
Ann Berach
Anthony Calpo
Beverly Zeff
Bob Saffle
Bobby Leonard
Boipelo Mooketsi
Charles Saffle
Christy Cybulski
Connie Francis
Dave Bever
Diane Szymanek
Domenick Notarantanio 
Don & Greta Billham
Doug Friends
Dryer family - Meyer, Welch & Hawkins
Ed Roach
Erin Lippert
Jan Moncrief
Jane Hamp
Jennifer Dahlem
Jim Hanna
Joan Gallagher
Joanne Westbrook
John Brothers
Judy Dobbins
Judy Lindquist
Judy Mason
Karen & her son Daniel
Katy Allen
Kelly Stephens
Ken Robinson
Lindsey Ward
Michelle Hano
Millie Randolph
Mr. & Mrs. Mario Whitehead & Joyce
Nick Palavis
Nora Coleman
Patty Neely
Paul Maine
Paul Rosnick
Penny Mourat
Phil Lanyon
Rachael
Rhonda Bruich
Rich Jeffers
Richard Redfern 
Ron Sekersky
Roxie Sosenko
Sherry VanGilder
Susan Ponville
T.J. Croft
Trina Lewis
Virginia & Paul Welch

Children
Aksel Ace
Audri King
Brandon Wares
Brody McUmor
Emily Icard 
Hunter Stafford
Jeffrey Konovich
Jonah Becker
Justus Loughry
Kya Schwertfeger
Kylee Leathers
McKenna Popish
Michael Liptak
Shelby Kamarec
Zoe Purcell

Military
Chris Cameron
Jonathan Criss
Kendra Mader 
Michael Criss
Stephen Mader 

Church Families
Ruth Coates
Tim & Chris Connell
Lou & Renee Contumelio & family

Local Congregation
St. Thomas Episcopal Church

Special Friend
Thelma Longacre - Unit 210, Chambrel at Montrose, 100 Bookmont Rd, Akron, OH  44333-3091

Presbyterian Churches and Organizations

The Connector Board
The Evangelism Committee, Rev. Sam Gibb, chairperson

Also Remember in Your Prayers
Alice Orr - Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Bob Morgan - Weirton Geriatric Center, 2526 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Harry Hutch - Brightwood
Jim Hanna - Weirton Geriatric Center, 2526 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Marge Black - Weirton Geriatric Center, Room 223, 2528 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Mike Valiga - Weirton Geriatric Center, 2530 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Thelma Longacre - Chambrel at Montrose, Unit 210, 100 Brookmont Rd, Akron, OH 44333-3091