Thursday, May 31, 2012

Hancock Teacher of the Year chosen

May 30, 2012

By STEPHEN HUBA - For The Weirton Daily Times (shuba@reviewonline.com) , Weirton Daily Times
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NEW CUMBERLAND - The 2013 Hancock County Teacher of the Year is a 1998 alumna of Weir High School who finds a way to make sophomore English fun.

Lissa Dulick, 32, of Weirton, was announced as Teacher of the Year at Tuesday's regular meeting of the Hancock County Board of Education.

"She is very deserving," said Superintendent Suzan Smith. "She has done quite a lot."

Dulick, who also teaches journalism through the Rider Review school newspaper, was among nine nominees for Teacher of the Year.

"It's a tremendous honor. I'm proud to represent Weir High School and Hancock County," said Dulick, who will compete for similar honors at the state level.

Dulick demurred when asked about her teaching abilities but then said, "The biggest compliment I get from my students is that I treat them all equally and fairly. They appreciate that. They say they learn a lot and have fun at the same time, which is not always easy when it comes to English."

Dulick, a graduate of West Virginia University with a master's degree in secondary education, is no stranger to teaching awards. In November, she was named one of only 39 recipients of the prestigious Milken Educator Award. Dulick received $25,000 from the Milken Family Foundation to do with as she chooses.

Smith praised all nine nominees as equally deserving of the title, Teacher of the Year.

"Any one of these teachers would represent Hancock County well. All of them have a passion for teaching and for children," Smith said. "Every one of these teachers has the perseverance to teach anyone in their classroom. They are great models of education, and all use a variety of teaching strategies."

The other nominees were:
Michele Lynch of Allison Elementary in Chester;
Jennifer Sanner of Broadview Elementary in Weirton;
Kristeen Davis of Liberty Elementary in Weirton;
Donna Carnes of New Manchester Elementary;
Jennifer Curtis of Weirton Heights Elementary;
Amy Hannahs of Oak Glen Middle School;
Eric Olson of Weir Middle School; and
Megan Walker of Oak Glen High School.

"What all these teachers share is the human connection they have with their students," Smith said.
All the nominees first won the Teacher of the Year title for their school. They were then evaluated for Hancock County honors by a six-member selection committee.

In other business Tuesday, the school board approved a lease agreement with CHANGE, Inc., of Weirton, to provide health care services at the new Weirton Elementary School.

The school, scheduled to be completed in two years, will unite Liberty, Broadview and Weirton Heights elementary schools under one roof. It also will house an adjoining health care facility known as a school-based health center.

Currently, there are no such facilities in the state's Northern Panhandle. Once developed, it will be the largest one in the state because the new school is expected to have 950 students, board President Jerry Durante said.

(Huba can be contacted at shuba@reviewonline.com)

Sunday's Minute for Mission - Multicultural Church/Immigration


Women in a pew
Children at Rushville Presbyterian Church
lead Togolese-style worship processional.

"'Whom shall I send and who will go for me?' said the Lord." In the 1830s, fledgling Presbyterian synods answered, "Here am I, Lord; send me," thus establishing churches in new villages on the frontier of Western Illinois. One such church is First Presbyterian in Rushville, population 3,000. About the same time, German Presbyterian missionaries replied, "Here am I; send me," as they sailed down the west coast of Africa and brought the good news to what is now French-speaking Togo, where churches still thrive. English-speaking Christians in Rushville; French-speaking Christians in Togo: Should ever the twain meet? God works in mysterious ways.

Enter the meat packing industry, which has moved from large Midwestern cities to small rural towns. One such plant 10 miles from Rushville offers jobs that are relatively well-paid but that do not require a command of English. Voila! The village of Rushville is now home to French-speaking Togolese Presbyterians. Twenty-five Togolese have become members of the 130-member Rushville Presbyterian Church. Praise abounds as the church experiences both African- and American-style worship. Long-time members teach English, help with citizenship studies, and pray when immigration crises surface. Fellowship dinners are a mix of Midwestern and West African home cooking. They share each other's joys and their "mutual burdens bear."

Friends, this story is being repeated across the country. In God’s mysterious way, we have the opportunity to be sent to our brothers and sisters from afar without going far. We, in turn, are blessed by the fellowship of Christians from different cultures whose faith journey enlivens our churches.

- Elder Ann Kelson, liaison to immigrants, Presbytery of Great Rivers

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - Quiet Wisdom


Psalm 32:1-7

 1 Count yourself lucky, how happy you must be— you get a fresh start,
      your slate’s wiped clean.

 2 Count yourself lucky—
      God holds nothing against you
      and you’re holding nothing back from him.

 3 When I kept it all inside,
      my bones turned to powder,
      my words became daylong groans.

 4 The pressure never let up;
      all the juices of my life dried up.

 5 Then I let it all out;
      I said, “I’ll make a clean breast of my failures to God.”
   Suddenly the pressure was gone—
      my guilt dissolved,
      my sin disappeared.

 6 These things add up. Every one of us needs to pray;
      when all hell breaks loose and the dam bursts
      we’ll be on high ground, untouched.

 7 God’s my island hideaway,
      keeps danger far from the shore,
      throws garlands of hosannas around my neck.


A Devotion by Woody A. Adams (North Carolina)

My parents had gone shopping. As I stood alone in Mom and Dad’s bedroom and my grandmother was napping in another part of the house, I noticed a box of matches on my Dad’s bedside table. As I picked up the box, I could hear in my mind my father’s voice saying as he had many times, “Don’t play with matches!” Behind the table were lovely white curtains. What would happen if I struck a match and touched the curtain quickly?

A small hole appeared in the curtain. I was horrified and quickly tucked the curtain behind the table. Maybe they would never see it. That night as I got in bed and pulled the covers over me, my stomach began to hurt. It got worse, and I wept. My father came to me and asked, “Son, what is the matter?”

I said, “I have a bad stomachache.”

My father sat quietly by my side, “Where does it hurt?”

He put his strong hand on my chest and asked, “Does it feel like a burned curtain?” Then he said, “Son, I think you have learned your lesson. I love you. Now get some sleep.”

My stomachache immediately stopped. My conscience was clean. I never forgot my father’s quiet wisdom. Through the years as I have grown in my faith, I have come to understand that God’s love and forgiveness clear the conscience.

Monday, May 28, 2012

Sunday's Sermon - Why Would a Cookie Frown?

Romans 8:17-27

17But if children, then heirs, heirs of God, and joint heirs with Christ, if indeed we might suffer so that we might also be glorified with him. 18For I consider that the suffering of the present age isn’t comparable to the glory which is about to be revealed in him. 19For the eager expectation of creation awaits the revelation of the sons of God. 20For to emptiness the creation is subject, not willingly but because of the one who subjected it, in hope 21that this creation will be set free from the slavery of corruption to the freedom of the glory of God’s children. 22For we know that all creation groans together and is travail at the present time; 23but not it alone, but also those who have the first fruits of the spirit, even we within ourselves groan because we await adoption, the redemption of our selves. 24For in hope, we are saved, but hope which is seen isn’t hope. For what he sees does a person hope? 25But if what we don’t see, then we hope because we await with patience.

26And likewise also the spirit helps in our weakness. For we don’t know how to pray as we ought, but this spirit intercedes with unutterable groans; 27and the one who searched the heart knows the mentality of the spirit, because according to God it intercedes for those who are holy.



Why Would a Cookie Frown?
I find the picture on the cover of the bulletin pretty interesting. I mean, on one side you’ve got a whole bunch of cookies all bright and sunny, you know sort of like I would feel if, in five years, people were talking about how Andrew Luck is, hands down, the greatest quarterback to ever lace up his cleats. I’m telling you, those cookies are happy, and you can tell that by the great big smiles on their little cookie faces. But, on the other side, well, we’ve got some cookies that are a little blue, right; sort of like the guy who was told by his basketball coach that he was short, but made up for it by being slow. No, there’s no way you could call these cookies snickerdoodles; they’re just too sad. And you can tell that by the big frown on their faces.

And you know, that really got me thinking: Why would a cookie frown? I mean, give me a break, what does a cookie have to face that would make it depressed: chocolate chip envy, an allergy to pecans, lactose intolerance? I mean, what could cause a cookie to frown? You see, Debbie and Maggie are in Indianapolis right now and I’ve had a lot of time to think about the important questions in life. Anyway, after a lot of thought, I believe I’ve narrowed it down to three possible answers. Why would a cookie frown? Well, maybe the manager of Eat N Park hired a dyslexic to decorate the cookies; that’s one. Or maybe the cookie suddenly realized that his best friends are a bunch of crumbs. (Wait for it.) Get it, cookie crumbs. Thank you, I’ll be appearing here all week. That’s a second possibility. Or maybe this, you know, for the more theologically minded. Maybe, just maybe, the cookie heard the first half of the passage we just read a little while ago, you know, with all that stuff about suffering and groaning and being in travail, something I’ve never experienced but I hear it’s pretty bad. No, this passage could wipe the smile off the Smiliest cookie, leaving a great big frown.

And I’ll tell you something else, I think it can do the same for your advantage Christian, folks like you and me, when the full weight of what Paul wrote in these verses, I mean, when the implications of this hits us between the eyes.

And if you know something about the letter, the fact that he wrote this at all, especially here, well, that’s kind of a surprise. I mean, as opposed to some of the other stuff he wrote this letter, chapter eight starts pretty good. My goodness, right at the beginning of the chapter Paul wrote, "There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus." Now that’s certainly good. And a little later he said, "To set the mind on the flesh is death, but to set the mind on the Spirit is life and peace." And after that, "but you have received a spirit of adoption. When we cry, ‘Abba! Father!’ it is that very Spirit bearing witness with our spirit that we are children of God." Not bad at all. And even at the beginning the passage we just read, "But if children, then heirs, heirs of God, and joint heirs with Christ." Heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ, man, you can’t beat that with a stick. And so even if you find out that you come from a long line of crumbs, knowing this stuff, well, I think it should put a smile on your frosting.

And if he’d left it there, the smile would probably stick, but of course, Paul didn’t. Nope, right after talking about how we’re heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ, he wrote, "if indeed we might suffer so that we might also be glorified with him." "If indeed we might suffer; talk about a let down. In other words, the road to glory, to our inheritance passes through Zombieland. Instead of milk and honey, as we struggle through life, all we can expect is generic diet cola and unsalted saltines, and there’s no reason to smile about that.

And if this wasn’t bad enough, Paul didn’t stop here. No sir, he then explained exactly what this suffering business is all about. "For I consider that the suffering of the present age isn’t comparable to the glory which is about to be revealed in him. For the eager expectation of creation awaits the revelation of the sons of God. For to emptiness the creation is subject, not willingly but because of the one who subjected it, in hope that this creation will be set free from the slavery of corruption to the freedom of the glory of God’s children. For we know that all creation groans together and is travail at the present time; but not it alone, but also those who have the first fruits of the spirit, even we within ourselves groan because we await adoption, the redemption of our selves. For in hope, we are saved, but hope which is seen isn’t hope. For what he sees does a person hope? But if what we don’t see, then we hope because we await with patience."

Oh boy, sounds good to me. Let’s see the time is coming when we’re going to be revealed for who we are in Christ, the sons of God. And when it comes, there’ll be freedom from corruption and redemption of our selves and salvation. That’s our future. Hot dog, Hallelujah.

There’s just one tiny problem, that’s all in the future; but we don’t live in the future, we live in the present, and the present is going to stink on ice. It’s sort of like that old joke about Joe and Pete, two guys who really love baseball. Well, Joe dies, and of course Pete is sad, that is until one day Joe appears in a vision and says, "Pete, I come from beyond the grave with good news and bad news. The good news is that heaven is wonderful. We play baseball all the time. We all bat .400 and heaven’s team never loses. But here’s the bad news, you’re pitching next Tuesday." In other words, although the future is going to be wonderful, the present is going to be rough, with a lot of disappointments and frustrations. As a matter of fact, since we’ve been made sons of God in Christ, we can’t expect to be treated any better than the Son of God. And so, when things turn sour, and they probably will, that’s just the way life is, we shouldn’t be surprised nor should we blame God.

This is exactly what we can expect, no "inside, outside, happy all the time." The Christian life is tough. It’s lived in hope for something better, but even this isn’t something we can see, rather, it’s something in which we can only trust and wait for with patience. Now that’s what Paul wrote, not exactly a message to win friends or influence people much less to win converts and influence church attendance, and certainly not something that puts a song in your heart and a spring in you step. But it’s something that’s true, as true as a child who dies of cancer or a soldier shot by a sniper. And there’s nothing to smile about with that.

And you know, if Paul had stopped here, well, that’s pretty depressing. But again, he didn’t, because he also wrote this: "And likewise also the spirit helps in our weakness. For we don’t know how to pray as we ought, but this spirit intercedes with unutterable groans; and the one who searched the heart knows the mentality of the spirit, because according to God it intercedes for those who are holy." In other words, life is rough, and it doesn’t matter whether you’re a Christian or not, life is just plain tough. In fact, if anything, it may be even tougher for a Christian then it is for others because we’re just not able to run with the crowd and play fast and loose with things like the truth.

But even though that’s the way it is, God knows us. Man, he knows us on our worse day, and he sure knows that we’re weak. And how does he know that? Well, remember he became one of us; he walked in our shoes and looked through our eyes and lived in our skin. God knows us; therefore, he doesn’t expect us to be anything more than what we are. I mean, knowing us as well as he does, he’d be an idiot to think that we can be better than men and women who have fallen short of his glory, you know, a bunch sinners who have the uncanny ability to exchange the truth for lies. That’s who we are and God knows it. And let’s get real, we all know a lot of the trouble we face we’ve done to ourselves. I mean, I can’t really blame God for my increasing weight or say it’s unfair when I scarfed down a quarter of a box of Cheez-its writing this sermon. I’ll tell you, God knows me inside and out. And he knows you too.

But guess what, he loves us anyway. In fact he loves us so much he’s given us something to tide us over until we get to the glory as yet unrevealed. You see, again without our help or even permission, God sent his Spirit, uniting us with Jesus. And because of that, right now we receive two things we wouldn’t otherwise have. First, we have a voice inside God. Since we’re one with Christ, we not only have an advocate within God himself, we also have a spokesman to lay before the father needs and concerns we may not have even realized that we had. That’s one.

And second, we also gives us the ability to draw closer to one another. Remember, it’s through the Spirit that we have different skills and talents that, if we’re sensitive and willing to develop and use them, can compliment one another just like the organs in the human body. But beyond the abilities, the spirit also gives us the attitude and perspective that allows us to live together in harmony. And I’m talking about things like, love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control." These are spiritual gifts, spiritual fruits. Now, if we claim these attitudes we’ll be able not only to work together but also to live together. And you know, together we can face anything life can throw at us. Divided, we’re weak; united, we’re strong.

I guess there are some good reasons for a cookie to frown. And when you think about the lives we live, there may be reasons for us to frown as well. Let’s face it, life is tough, and because it is, God doesn’t want us to be unprepared. But you know, because of the Holy Spirit, which God has given us and which united us in Christ and with one another, we can face the present and move into the future. And if we’re not careful, that just might but a smile on that cookie’s face.

Sunday, May 27, 2012

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - To Show the World


File:Eugene Burnand - Das hohepriesterliche Gebet.jpg
John 17:20-26

20I am not praying just for these followers. I am also praying for everyone else who will have faith because of what my followers will say about me. 21I want all of them to be one with each other, just as I am one with you and you are one with me. I also want them to be one with us. Then the people of this world will believe that you sent me.

22I have honored my followers in the same way that you honored me, in order that they may be one with each other, just as we are one. 23I am one with them, and you are one with me, so that they may become completely one. Then this world’s people will know that you sent me. They will know that you love my followers as much as you love me.

24Father, I want everyone you have given me to be with me, wherever I am. Then they will see the glory that you have given me, because you loved me before the world was created. 25Good Father, the people of this world don’t know you. But I know you, and my followers know that you sent me. 26I told them what you are like, and I will tell them even more. Then the love that you have for me will become part of them, and I will be one with them.


A Devotion by Mike Ripski (Tennessee) 

Jesus was a traveling rabbi. When he called persons to follow him, they had to leave their life as it was and go God-only-knew-where. How hard it must have been for the disciples to leave their families, their work, the life they knew, to follow Jesus whose only road map was the voice of God! And in the end, Jesus was moving without them: “Where I am going, you cannot come,” he says (John 13:33). “I am going...to prepare a place for you...that you also may be where I am” (John 14:2-3).

What good news does John want the church to hear in Jesus’ message? First, assurance that the Holy Spirit will be with them. Jesus tells his disciples, “It is to your advantage that I go away, for if I...go, I will send [the Advocate] to you” (John 16:7, nrsv). On Pentecost, the Holy Spirit came so that the church could be Jesus’ presence in his absence.

Second, Jesus prays that his disciples will be unified. He prays that they will show the world what sacrificial love can do. Jesus prays that they and we will be faithful to the way, truth, and life that he has demonstrated. Jesus prays that as he and the Father are one, so we all would be bound together in Christian love, no matter where the Holy Spirit leads us.

Friday, May 25, 2012

What's Happening at Cove Presbyterian Church?


Below are the announcements as they appear in the Cove Presbyterian Church Sunday bulletin.
  • DON’T FORGET SUNDAY SCHOOL  . . .
    we meet every Sunday morning at 9:45 a.m.  Think about trying out one of our classes. We have a variety of classes to choose from to fit your needs.
  • OUR CHILDREN PRACTICE HANDBELLS . . .
    every Sunday morning at 10:30 a.m. in the old Youth Room
  • THE CHURCH AND OFFICE WILL BE CLOSED. . .
     tomorrow, May 28, 2012 in observance of the Memorial Day Holiday.
  • THE BROWN BAG BIBLE STUDY . . .
    will meet on May 31, beginning at 12:30 p.m. We’ll be looking at 1 Corinthians.
  • SUMMER COMMUNION . . .
    will be observed during the worship service next Sunday, June 3.
  • ANNUAL FRIENDSHIP TRIP . . .
    of the Myrtle McHendry Class will be held on Monday, June 4th at Ponderosa Golf Course. Esten Jezerski will lead the devotions. Lunch will be enjoyed followed by an afternoon of fun and games. A Blind $.50 Auction will be held - so ladies bring your surprise bags and your quarters and we’ll all join in the fun! The car pool will leave from the state office parking lot at 11:30a.m. If you missed a reservation you can still call Bonnie Nichols at 304-723-5134 today, May 27th.
  • THE DEACONS WILL MEET . . .
    Monday, June 4 at 7:00 p.m. in the board room.  We will be discussing our summer agenda, as we will not meet again until September.
  • THE BOARD OF SESSION WILL MEET . . .
    Tuesday, June 5 at 6:30 p.m. in the board room.
  • SCHOLARSHIP & SENIOR RECOGNITION SUNDAY . . .
    will be held on Sunday, June 10, 2012. Scholarship will be awarded for the 2012 -2013 scholastic year.  Also, if you know of a graduating senior, please contact the church office so that we might  recognize them on that day.
  • THANK YOU . . .
    Boy Scouts & Cub Scouts! Your spring food drive for the Deacons Food Pantry brought in 1038 items on Saturday, May 19th. 126 of those items were discarded, having expired dates. A $ 10.00 donation was also received. A special thank you to the leaders, and parents who helped by sorting, counting and assisted with stocking the food pantry.
  • THE PRESBYTERIAN WOMEN ARE COLLECTING CLEANING SUPPLIES . . .
    and party supplies to be sent to the Shack Neighborhood House in Pursglove, West Virginia near Morgantown. These items may include dish and laundry detergent, cleaners, soap, towels, sponges and wash cloths. Also, tablecloths and party supplies for their  school children’s summer activities are being collected. Hygiene items such as hand sanitizers, tissues and hand wipes may be included. The Shack is one of the
    Presbyterian mission projects supported by our Presbyterian Women. A box has been placed near Fellowship Hall for your donations.
  • AFTER APRIL 1 . . .
    please re-register or register your Kroger Card at Kroger Community Rewards and list Cove Presbyterian as your recipient. It costs you nothing, you loose no money or points and the church gets a quarterly payment based on what members spend. If you do not have a computer, just contact the church office and we will gladly set-up your account for you. It only takes a few minutes. To verify that you are registered, check the bottom of your receipt – it should read – You requested Kroger to donate to COVE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
  • PRAYER BOXES . . .
    please return your lenten prayer box to the basket on the table in the narthex.
  • BOARD MEMBERS . . .
    remember to check and empty your mailboxes periodically. Meeting minutes and other items of importance are often put into the boxes for your reference.
  • BULLETIN DEADLINE . . .
    if you wish to have an article published in the weekly bulletin, please have the article into the church office by Wednesday at noon. Thank you for your cooperation.
  • STOP IN THE CHURCH LIBRARY . . .
    to view a picture of Holiday’s Cove from 1905 showing a view of Cove Church.  The picture is compliments of the Weirton Museum.
  • DO YOU HAVE A NEW ADDRESS,. . .
    new phone number or new e-mail ? Please contact the church office so we can update our records. We like to keep everyone informed of our events.  If you don’t receive mailings from us,  we may not have your current/correct information.
  • REMINDER, PLEASE COVER  . . .
    the top of the church’s tables before they are used for any activity. They will stain and are hard to clean, this can be avoided with a little cooperation. GREETERS NEEDED . . .
    if you would like to serve as a greeter before a Sunday morning worship service, please contact Bonnie Nichols at 304-723-5134.
  • WE ARE BLOGGING!
    We now have six blogs that you can check out for information and on which you can leave comments. They're listed below:
    • The Cove Community (www.thecovecommunity.blogspot.com) - This is for the whole church. I'll post sermons and announcements. I also invite y'all to send in material that you'd like to share with other members of the congregation. And please feel free to comment on anything you might read.
    • Cove Kids (www.covekids.blogspot.com) - This is tailored for the preteen young people in our church. Again I'll post announcements. You're also invited to send in any writings, photographs and art work you'd like to post. And they don't have to all deal with the church. We also post artwork from Jesus Time.
    • Glue (www.cove-glue.blogspot.com) - Our teens are running their own blog site; therefore, I have no idea what will be posted.
    • Bible Talk (www.cove-bibletalk.blogspot.com) - We've established this blog to give pastors and lay people the chance to discuss Scripture. The weekly passages are from the Common Lectionary, and we're posting the pastor’s translation of the  Greek text. We want you to read any or all of the passages and to leave any comment or ask any question that you feel is appropriate. Please include any research you've done. As we share our ideas and insights, we hope that we'll all come to a better and deeper understanding of the Bible. Each passage is linked to a website that offers some informative information.
    • Let’s Talk About It (www.cove-talk.blogspot.com) - Through this site, we hope to encourage a conversation on a variety of topics. Since this blog is sponsored by a church, we expect most of the issues to involve the Christian faith. Still we don't want to limit ourselves or you. If you have a topic that you'd like us to discuss, include it as a comment to a previous issue. Please phrase it as a question and offer a summary of at least two positions. We'll add a new item to discuss every three weeks. We hope this challenges you to apply your faith to issues that are important to you.
    • The Bible in a Year (www.cove-bibleinayear.blogspot.com) - Each day, we'll post passages so that you can read the Bible in one year.  
  • IT IS OFTEN DIFFICULT TO HEAR PRAYER REQUESTS . . .
    on Sunday mornings. If you would like to have someone added to the prayer chain please drop a short note into the collection plate with their name and any other information you would like to share.  You may also call the church office or e-mail the church with the information. 
  • IF YOU LEAVE AN ITEM AT  CHURCH . . .
    for someone or for a specific function, please take a moment to write the information on the item.  If there is no name on the item we will assume it is for the church in general.
  • IN THE HOSPITAL? HOMEBOUND? RECENT ILLNESS?. . .
    if you are unable to attend services and would like to arrange for a visit from  Rev. Ed Rudiger please contact the church office. Also if you would like to be included in our weekly bulletin  mailings contact the church office.
  • WE CAN ALWAYS DO A BETTER JOB MINISTERING . . .
    to the needs within this congregation, community and world. Please feel free to offer any suggestions as comments.
  • LOOSE CHANGE OFFERING . . .
    Session approved the Deacons collecting a “Loose Change Offering” that will be used to assist the Deacons with their utility assistance outreach program for Weirton residents or Cove Church members. We hope church members can help with the assistance program by donating some of their spare change. A container is placed in the Narthex each Sunday morning before church. The Deacons thank you for your continuing support of their projects.
  • VASES OF FLOWERS. . .
    can be purchased for a service. The cost is  $16.00 a vase.  Silk flowers or live plants can be purchased for an additional cost. The  flower calendar is located on the far wall in the church narthex or you can telephone the church office to place your order. After the service, the flowers will be placed in a plastic vase for you to take with you. 
  • IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS. . .
    newsletters from old friends  or articles about or by members of Cove Church,  check out the  bulletin board located in the hallway by the church offices.  Past event pictures are also on display in that area.
  • WE’RE UPDATING OUR PRAYER AND DEVOTION LINE . . .
    about four times a week. If you would like to call and hear a devotional, please call 304-748-7900.
  • ONGOING MISSION PROJECTS . . .
    • Used Can Tabs are being collected for the Ronald McDonald House in Morgantown, West Virginia. Deposit your tabs in the container located in the main hallway downstairs.
    • Campbell’s Labels are being collected by the Presbyterian Women for the Weirton Christian Center.  The labels including the bar code or just the bar code can be dropped off in the container located in the main  hallway downstairs.
    • Greeting Cards are being collected. Please drop off your Greeting Cards or just the front of the card in the box located in the main hallway downstairs. The cards are being sent to St. Jude’s  Ranch to be remade into cards to be sold in their gift shop.  Hallmark, Disney or American Greeting Cards can not be accepted as they are trade marked.
    We thank you for your participation and support of our mission endeavors.  

Pentecost


On Sunday we remember another day on the church calendar that generally gets lost in the shuffle, and yet Pentecost represents the birth of the church. During Sunday's worship, we'll focus on the coming and importance of the Holy Spirit. And to put us in the mood, below is an article from the General Assembly Mission Council.

 

Day of Pentecost

Painting of a dove with a halo flying over a group of colorfully dressed people with halos.
A 15th century German depiction of Pentecost.
On the Day of Pentecost we celebrate the gift of the Holy Spirit descending in a mighty rush of wind and flame to inspire the church’s proclamation of Christ’s rising and to empower its mission and ministry to the world. (See Acts 2:1-13; see also Joel 2:28-32.)
The notion of Easter as a season of 50 days ending at Pentecost is patterned after the ancient Jewish festival of seven weeks that extended from the beginning of the barley harvest (on the second day after the beginning of Passover) to the end of the wheat harvest at the Festival of Weeks or Shavuot (see Deuteronomy 16:9-12). The Festival of Weeks later came to be called Pentecost (“50th day”) by Greek speaking Jews. In Jewish tradition, Shavuot also marks the giving of the law to Moses at Sinai; this liturgical link may inform Paul’s discussions of the law and the Spirit (see Romans 8, 2 Corinthians 3 and Galatians 3).

PENTECOST IS NEW CREATION

An excerpt from the Companion to the Book of Common Worship (Geneva Press, 2003, 117-119)
According to the Day of Pentecost story in Acts 2:1-13, God gave the gift of the Holy Spirit to empower witnesses to the resurrection. Sounds from heaven, cosmic language, the rush of a mighty ruach (wind, spirit, breath) invaded the house in which the apostles gathered, and appeared to them as a burning fire. Tongues of fire touched their nerve centers. A power — the unseen power of God — moved among them and gripped them. The Holy Spirit is unseen, like the wind, which is why the Old Testament calls itruach YHWH, “the wind, or breath, of God” (cf. John 3:8). The Spirit is the “unseenness of God” working among us.
According to Joel (2:28-29) the ruach is to open everybody to God’s future. People young and old will dream and will have visions of hope; they will be able to loose themselves from the way things are now, because God is establishing a whole new economy of creation. The Holy Spirit breaks us out of our preoccupation with ourselves and frees us to serve neighbors, loosens our grasp on possessions, and sets us to loving people. New creation is what Joel is talking about. Pentecost is new creation.
The book of Acts tells the story of the outcome of Pentecost’s new creation: people witness in word and in deed to the risen Christ. At the outset, the newborn church immediately tumbled out into the streets to witness to God’s mighty works in the languages of people all over the world. By the end of the story, a tiny, Spirit-filled community of faith that broke from its present order has spread across the continents with incredible power to bring new things into being. With the gift of the Spirit, all things are possible. …
Therefore, on the Day of Pentecost, we celebrate God’s gift of Holy Spirit which draws us together as one people, helps us to comprehend what God is doing in the world, and empowers us to proclaim, in word and in deed, God’s plan of reconciling all people in the name of Christ (Ephesians 1:10).
Without the gift of the Spirit, Christ’s church dries up and withers away, and we are left with only our broken selves. With the gift of the Spirit, all things are possible. A spirit-filled community of faith opens eyes to needs in the world and sees its missing as God’s new people. The Day of Pentecost is the climax of the Great Fifty Days of Easter, celebrating as it does the gift of the Spirit to the body of Christ — the church.
And below is a poem by James Montgomery appropriately entitled "Pentecost."
Lord God, the Holy Ghost,
In this accepted hour,
As on the day of Pentecost,
Descend in all thy power.
We meet with one accord
Within this hallowed place,
And wait the promise of our Lord,
The Spirit of all grace.

Like mighty rushing wind
Upon the waves beneath,
Move with one impulse every mind;
One soul, one feeling breathe;
The young, the old inspire
With wisdom from above;
And give us hearts and tongues of fire,
To pray, and praise, and love.

Spirit of light, explore
And chase our gloom away,
With lustre shining more and more
Unto the perfect day.
Spirit of truth, be Thou,
In life and death, our guide:
O Spirit of adoption, now
May we be sanctified.

Prayer Requests, to be shared during Sunday’s worship service

On Sunday, May 27, Cove Presbyterian Church will lift the following needs to God.


Adults
Alden Edwards
Andrea Vincent
Andy DiRemigio
Ann Berach
Anthony Calpo
Betty Spencer
Beverly Zeff
Bob Saffle
Bobby Leonard
Brandon Faucett
Carol Kraina Mowl
Charles Saffle
Christy Cybulski
Connie Francis
Dave Bever
David Potter
Diane Szymanek
Domenick Notarantanio
Don & Greta Billham
Doug Friends
Ed Roach
Eric Minor
Jan Moncrief
Jennifer Dahlem
Jessica Hibbs & her newborn son Luka
Jim Hanna
Joan Gallagher
Joanne Westbrook
Jodi Lauttamus
John Brothers
Joshua Crow
Judy Dobbins
Judy Lindquist
Judy Mason
Karen & her son Daniel
Kelly Stephens
Lindsey Ward
Marjie Dinges
Maurene Roth
Michelle Hano
Mr. & Mrs. Mario Whitehead & Joyce
Nick Palavis
Nora Coleman
Paul Maine
Paul Rosnick
Peggy Murphy
Penny Mourat
Rachael
Rhonda Bruich
Rich Jeffers
Richard Redfern
Ron Sekersky
Roxie Sosenko
Sally Robinson
Sherry VanGilder
Susan Ponville
T.J. Croft
Turner Family
Virginia & Paul Welch

Children
Aksel Ace
Audri King
Brandon Wares
Brody McUmor
Emily Icard
Hunter Stafford
Jeffrey Konovich
Jonah Becker
Justus Loughry
Kya Schwertfeger
Kylee Leathers
McKenna Popish
Michael Liptak
Shelby Kamarec
Zoe Purcell

Military
Chris Cameron
Jonathan Criss
Kendra Mader
Michael Criss
Stephen Mader

Church Families
Mike, Dawn, Bailey & Julia Donell
Rodney, Dana, Ryan & Hanna Dragonir
David, Nicole, Mason & Kendall Drobish

Local Church
Christ United Methodist Church

Special Friends
Mike Valiga - Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton, WV  26062-3652

Presbyterian Bodies
Training & Development Committee, Matt Camlin & Cindy Foster, chairpersons
Worship Committee & Youth Council Director, Lisa Buckingham

Also Remember in Your Prayers
Alice Orr - Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV  26062
Bob Morgan - Weirton Geriatric Center, , 2526 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Harry Hutch - Villa Vista, Room 507, 1800 Sinclair Ave, Steubenville, OH 43953
Jim Hanna - Weirton Geriatric Center
Marge Black - Weirton Geriatric Center, Room 223, 2528 Pennsylvania Ave , Weirton, WV 26062
Mike Valiga - Weirton Geriatric Center, 2530 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Thelma Longacre - Chambrel at Montrose, Unit 210, 100 Brookmont Rd, Akron, OH 44333-3091

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - Starting the Day


Psalm 150:1-6

   Hallelujah! Praise God in his holy house of worship,
      praise him under the open skies;
   Praise him for his acts of power,
      praise him for his magnificent greatness;
   Praise with a blast on the trumpet,
      praise by strumming soft strings;
   Praise him with castanets and dance,
      praise him with banjo and flute;
   Praise him with cymbals and a big bass drum,
      praise him with fiddles and mandolin.
   Let every living, breathing creature praise God!
      Hallelujah!


A Devotion by Elaine Brown (Perthshire, Scotland)

Some time ago while staying in a mission guesthouse in Ethiopia, my husband and I woke one morning to the sound of five or six voices singing a hymn. What a delightful start for our day! The sound came from a large room close to ours; and not long afterwards, when I met the family at breakfast, I told them how much we had appreciated their singing.

“We always like to begin the day that way,” the mother explained.

I thought about her words as we traveled home to our own mission station; and soon afterwards, my husband and I decided to start our day with a praise song too. We used a large hymnbook that friends had given us at the start of our mission assignment. We have sung a morning hymn together ever since. Doing so lifts our thoughts to God before we go on to read the Bible and to pray.

I’m glad that, quite unintentionally, a family introduced us to this simple yet uplifting start for each day. What can you do to begin your days with a sense of God’s presence and love?

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Sunday's Minute for Mission - Day of Pentecost


A man and woman and some children
Nancy Smith-Mather and Jacob Kuju
played with some of the children in his town.
Photo by Santino Joseph Tifho.

If you ever look out an airplane's window and see a woman with a log on her head scurrying off the dirt runway, you will probably need a guide and an interpreter once you land. Even with the Holy Spirit constantly guiding us, I am grateful God also provides human guides like Jacob Kuju.

Jacob, Santino, and I facilitated Bible studies together in South Sudanese churches. During those gatherings I saw a glimpse of the scene captured in Acts 2. Like the crowd at Pentecost, the church members at Bible study, through Jacob's translation, heard of God's wonders in their mother tongue. When I spoke in English and when Santino spoke in Arabic, Jacob translated into the local language.

More than an interpreter, Jacob was a young man with great vision. His actions boldly witnessed to a different way of relating to others. Unfortunately, recurring violence between Jacob's community, the Murle, and their neighbors, the Jiye, caused the groups to distrust one another. Even when tensions were high, however, Jacob crossed into the Jiye community for Bible study. Jacob risked his life to bring neighbors together. Jacob also worked to improve the treatment of women and girls in his community. Because his nephews' school fees were covered but not those of his nieces, Jacob paid for the girls to go to school. One day, a man in Jacob's town began beating a young woman. Jacob tried to protect the girl and was struck with a deadly blow.

On Pentecost, I remember Jacob's amazing guidance and courage.

- Rev. Nancy Smith-Mather, PC(USA) and Reformed Church in America mission co-worker in South Sudan

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - The Way Out


Luke 24:13-32

13-16That same day two of them were walking to the village Emmaus, about seven miles out of Jerusalem. They were deep in conversation, going over all these things that had happened. In the middle of their talk and questions, Jesus came up and walked along with them. But they were not able to recognize who he was.

17-18He asked, “What’s this you’re discussing so intently as you walk along?”

They just stood there, long-faced, like they had lost their best friend. Then one of them, his name was Cleopas, said, “Are you the only one in Jerusalem who hasn’t heard what’s happened during the last few days?”

19-24He said, “What has happened?”

They said, “The things that happened to Jesus the Nazarene. He was a man of God, a prophet, dynamic in work and word, blessed by both God and all the people. Then our high priests and leaders betrayed him, got him sentenced to death, and crucified him. And we had our hopes up that he was the One, the One about to deliver Israel. And it is now the third day since it happened. But now some of our women have completely confused us. Early this morning they were at the tomb and couldn’t find his body. They came back with the story that they had seen a vision of angels who said he was alive. Some of our friends went off to the tomb to check and found it empty just as the women said, but they didn’t see Jesus.”

25-27Then he said to them, “So thick-headed! So slow-hearted! Why can’t you simply believe all that the prophets said? Don’t you see that these things had to happen, that the Messiah had to suffer and only then enter into his glory?” Then he started at the beginning, with the Books of Moses, and went on through all the Prophets, pointing out everything in the Scriptures that referred to him.

28-31They came to the edge of the village where they were headed. He acted as if he were going on but they pressed him: “Stay and have supper with us. It’s nearly evening; the day is done.” So he went in with them. And here is what happened: He sat down at the table with them. Taking the bread, he blessed and broke and gave it to them. At that moment, open-eyed, wide-eyed, they recognized him. And then he disappeared.

32Back and forth they talked. “Didn’t we feel on fire as he conversed with us on the road, as he opened up the Scriptures for us?”

Ashcombe MazeA Devotion by Luis Alberto Jones (Chubut, Argentina)

Our family was enjoying a vacation at a theme park. Suddenly my wife and I noticed that our small son was missing. Greatly alarmed, we began searching for him. Someone told us to check the maze created by a series of hedges. We climbed a platform that allowed us to see its entire layout. With great relief and joy, we saw our son — lost within the maze and frightened. From our vantage point we could see him, but our son’s focus was on finding the way out. He was so afraid that he couldn’t recognize us or even see us. But soon we were together again, and we could comfort him.

This experience brought to mind the Bible passage that tells how after his resurrection, Jesus walked with two of the disciples who failed to recognize him. They heard his voice and saw his face, yet their vision was clouded and they failed to discern who he was.

Sometimes we find ourselves in similar circumstances. Faced with challenges, we become disillusioned and uncertain. Then Christ appears, offering guidance and hope to us. Even in the depths of our distress, Christ continues to walk by our side, hold our hand, and guide us until we find the way out.

Monday, May 21, 2012

Sunday's Sermon - Back to Basics



1 John 5:9-13

9If the witness of people we receive, then the witness of God is greater, because this is the witness of God, that he has bore witness concerning his son. 10The one who believes in the son of God has the witness within himself; the one who doesn’t believe in God makes him a liar because he doesn’t believe in the witness to which God bore witness concerning his son. 11And this is the witness, that life eternal God gave to us, and this life is in his son. 12The one who has the son has the life; the one who doesn’t have the son of God doesn’t have the life. 13These things I’m writing to you, so that you might know that you have life eternal, to those who believe in the name of God’s son.

Back to Basics

Usually, whenever I hear someone start talking about getting back to basics, I generally have a pretty good idea what’s going on. Some system they’re involved in has either become more complicated or maybe expensive than it used to be. In fact, it’s probably become so complicated that only a few people, if that many, really know what’s going on or so expensive that there’s no way they’re going to have enough money to pay for it. And so, to solve the problem, they decide to do something pretty radical. Instead of just tinkering with the system or trimming the costs, they kind of push the whole mess aside so that they can focus on what’s really essential, what’s most important, what’s absolutely needed. In other words, they try to go back to what’s basic.

And I’ll tell, doing this kind of thing, well, to me it makes a lot of sense. In fact, although it’s not easy, it’s probably something we should intentionally do from time to time. I mean, even though it may mean moving away from some systems and structures in which we’ve become comfortable and let’s face it, that’s never easy, it’s a matter of giving up something we may like, it also means that we actually have a chance to come up with something a whole lot better than what we’ve got, something that just makes sense and that everybody can understand and maybe even something that enables us to do a whole lot more with the resources we’ve been given.

No, getting back to basics can be a great way to move past the inefficient and out-of-date so that we can meet the challenges we’re going to face in the future and to do that with focus and flexibility. In other words, whether you’re talking about government or business, marriages or families, denominational structure or congregational mission, every-now-and-then, well, it seems to me that getting back to basics is just, plain a good thing to do. In fact, maybe that’s why Thomas Jefferson said that "every generation needs a new revolution."

And you know, I think the same thing applies to our Christian faith. Maybe from time to time we also need a personal spiritual revolution, maybe we should sort of wipe the slate clean so that we can get back to the basics of what Christianity is all about. I mean, let’s face it, just like everything else, Christians can become distracted by spiritual clutter, you know, things like how much water should be used in baptism or whether a congregation should sing to an organ, a piano or a guitar. My gosh, people become all upset when you talk about whether or not to serve coffee in the Narthex or even whether to call it a "narthex" or a lobby. In other words, our faith can be overloaded with certain words you have to say and decisions you have to make. Our churches can be dragged down by traditions that nobody can remember how they got started but that can’t be changed. And as a result, the influence we have in a world that really no longer cares about our words or decisions or traditions becomes like a puddle on a hot, dry day. You see, for our sakes and for the sake of all those simple folks who may never hear about Jesus if not for us, we may need to get back to the basics of what we believe.

And I’ll tell you, a good place to start is right here with what we read this morning, you know, the one from John’s first letter, a passage that focuses on what he called "the witness" or the testimony that we’ve received, and as I read it, here it is: At its core, the basic witness is given by God, received by those who believe, and focused on the life that’s possible through Jesus Christ. And even though we might want to unpack it a little bit just so that we’re all on the same page, I think this is really what’s basic about our faith in Christ.

I mean, just take a look at the passage and notice that, according to John, first, the basic witness is given by God. As he wrote right up front, "If the witness of people we receive, then the witness of God is greater, because this is the witness of God, that he has bore witness concerning his son." In other words, what we’re talking about here isn’t from us. The message we claim isn’t a lot of pseudo-intellectual jargon to make us feel smart or spiritual-sounding regulations to make us feel religious or culturally-conditioned principles to make us feel comfortable. No, the source of this witness, this testimony is God himself.

And I’ll tell you, I think that’s really significant. You see, because it has it’s origin in God, God is really the one behind the wheel. It’s like I’ve heard folks say, if God is your co-pilot, change seats. You see, this is all from God, all we have is from God, not us. For example, John wrote in his gospel, "the Father has sent his Son as the Savior of the world," and we didn’t have anything to do with that decision or that action. And who was his Son, this savior of the world, the one whom the Father sent into our space? Everybody here knows the one I’m talking about. It’s like John the Baptist said when he saw Jesus. He said to his followers, "I saw the Spirit descending from heaven like a dove, and it remained on him. I myself did not know him, but the one who sent me to baptize with water said to me, ‘He on whom you see the Spirit descend and remain is the one who baptizes with the Holy Spirit.’ And I myself have seen and have testified that this is the Son of God." Now that’s the one whom the Father sent, without our help or permission. As a matter of fact, even our ability to understand all this comes from God. Did you realize that? We know this only because of God. It’s like Jesus said, "When the Advocate comes, whom I will send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth who comes from the Father, he will testify on my behalf." I’ll tell you, if we want to get back to basics, we need to remember that the witness itself is given by God. That’s one.

But second, I think we also need to remember that this basic witness is received by those who believe. Again, this is what John wrote in our passage: "The one who believes in the son of God has the witness within himself; the one who doesn’t believe in God makes him a liar because he doesn’t believe in the witness to which God bore witness concerning his son." You see, even though, according to John, God has actually put this witness within us, it only shapes who we are when we have faith, when we believe.

And what is this faith business all about? Well, this is how Jesus described it: "Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me? The words that I say to you I do not speak on my own; but the Father who dwells in me does his works. Believe me that I am in the Father and the Father is in me; but if you do not, then believe me because of the works themselves." In other words, although faith may have all kinds of implications, at it’s core, it’s simply believing that Jesus is the one he claimed to be, that he and the father are one, in other words, that he is God. And when we believe that, when we accept this message that God has put within us, and when we try to grow in that faith, our lives change. As John wrote in his gospel, "Now Jesus did many other signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not written in this book. But these are written so that you may come to believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that through believing you may have life in his name."

And earlier in this letter, John wrote, "Everyone who believes that Jesus is the Christ has been born of God, and everyone who loves the parent loves the child. By this we know that we love the children of God, when we love God and obey his commandments." Although it’s empowered and enabled by God himself, our believing is how we receive this gift; therefore, if we want to get back to basics, we need to remember that the witness is received by faith. That’s two.

But I think there’s one more thing that’s really basic to this witness. You see, not only is it given through God and received by faith, third, it’s focused on the life that’s possible through Jesus Christ. I mean, I don’t think John could be much clearer about it. Remember he wrote, "And this is the witness, that life eternal God gave to us, and this life is in his son. The one who has the son has the life; the one who doesn’t have the son of God doesn’t have the life. These things I’m writing to you, so that you might know that you have life eternal, to those who believe in the name of God’s son." You see, it’s through Jesus Christ that we have eternal life.

But before we move on from here and assume that "eternal life" means "life without end," you know, life into the future, I think we better pause for just a second. Because even though that’s certainly how Noah Webster would have defined it, that doesn’t seem to be what Jesus had in mind, certainly not when he prayed, "Father, the hour has come; glorify your Son so that the Son may glorify you,

since you have given him authority over all people, to give eternal life to all whom you have given him. And this is eternal life, that they may know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent." You see, for Jesus, eternal life wasn’t something that happened in the future, instead it was a relationship you could enjoy in the present. In other words, we’re enjoying life, real life, eternal life, if we’re in a relationship with God, something that God has already given to us and that we can make complete through our faith.

And if, right now we’re eternally alive, then we’re going to receive two things. First we have a source of eternal security, because, as Jesus said, "I give them eternal life, and they will never perish. No one will snatch them out of my hand." And second, we have an eternal responsibility. Listen to what John wrote, "We know that we have passed from death to life because we love one another. Whoever does not love abides in death. All who hate a brother or sister are murderers, and you know that murderers do not have eternal life abiding in them." Brother and sisters, if we want to go back to what’s basic, we need to remember that the witness we’ve been given and that we received is focused on the life that’s possible through Jesus Christ. And that’s three.

As long as the world is complicated and expensive, people will continue to go back to basics from time to time. And that’s probably a good thing. And I’ll tell you, when our faith becomes complicated and confusing, we might need to do the same thing ourselves. And when we do, let’s spend a little time with this passage from John’s first letter and remember, that at its core, the witness we have is given by God, received by those who believe, and focused on the life that’s possible through Jesus Christ. Spiritually, that would be getting back to basics.

Saturday, May 19, 2012

Sunday's Minute for Mission - Presbyterian Heritage

The second of three sons born to Henry Grimke, a wealthy Charleston planter and his slave, Nancy Weston, Francis J. Grimke (1850-1937) remained a slave until the end of the Civil War. In 1866, with help from the Freedman's Aid Society, Francis and his brother Archibald enrolled at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, where the brothers' hard work and talent caught the attention of their famous abolitionist aunts, Angelina and Sarah Grimke. Upon learning the young men were in fact their nephews, the Grimke sisters decided to further finance their education. In 1878, Francis graduated from Princeton Theological Seminary, was ordained by the Presbytery of Washington City, and was installed as pastor of Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church in Washington, DC.

Grimke used his pulpit at Fifteenth Street to speak against racial discrimination. Criticizing Booker T. Washington for his accomodationist stance, and later President Woodrow Wilson for his indifference, Francis became increasingly forceful in his views, demanding absolute equality for African Americans. In his sermons he invoked the names of African American leaders in order to inspire and embolden his listeners: ``Fathers and mothers . . . remember what I am saying; see to it that your children catch the spirit of which I am speaking, and which was so magnificently exemplified in the character of our great leader and champion [Frederick Douglass]. . . . Teach your sons and daughters . . . that though they may have a dark skin, they are just as much the children of God, are just as dear to Him, and are entitled to the same rights and privileges, under the Constitution, as the whitest child.'' (Excerpt from a sermon delivered by Francis Grimke at Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church, 1898.)

Grimke served the Presbyterian church for nearly 50 years, becoming for future generations the very figure of inspiration about which he had preached.

Friday, May 18, 2012

What's Happening at Cove Presbyterian Church


The announcements as they appear in Sunday's bulletin are below.

DON’T FORGET SUNDAY SCHOOL  . . .
we meet every Sunday morning at 9:45 a.m.  Think about trying out one of our classes. We have a variety of classes to choose from to fit your needs.

OUR CHILDREN PRACTICE HANDBELLS . . .
every Sunday morning at 10:30 a.m. in the old Youth Room.  The children will play next Sunday, May 27 during the morning worship.

BOOKMARKS . . .
Cove’s Reading Group will meet on Monday, May 21, 2012 at 6:30 p.m. in  the church parlor.

THE BROWN BAG BIBLE STUDY . . .
will meet on May 24, beginning at 12:30 p.m. We’ll be looking at Unitarians and Universalists.

THE CHURCH AND OFFICE WILL BE CLOSED ON MAY 28, 2012 . . .
in observance of the Memorial Day Holiday.

SUMMER COMMUNION . . .
will be observed during the worship service on Sunday, June 3.

DEACONS MEETING . . .
Monday, June 4 at 7:00 p.m. in the board room.  We will be discussing our summer agenda, as we will not meet again until September.

SCHOLARSHIP & SENIOR RECOGNITION SUNDAY . . .
will be held on Sunday, June 10, 2012. Scholarship will be awarded for the 2012 -2013 scholastic year.  Also, if you know of a graduating senior, please contact the church office so that we might  recognize them on that day.

BESS MCCAFFERY . . .
was the mother honored on  Mother’s Day. She was presented a hand-made afghan by Darlene Johnson and donated by the Boards of Session & Trustees.  Congratulations Bess!!

THE PRESBYTERIAN WOMEN ARE COLLECTING CLEANING SUPPLIES . . .
and party supplies to be sent to the Shack Neighborhood House in Pursglove, West Virginia near Morgantown. These items may include dish and laundry detergent, cleaners, soap, towels, sponges and wash cloths. Also, tablecloths and party supplies for their  school children’s summer activities are being collected. Hygiene items such as hand sanitizers, tissues and hand wipes may be included. The Shack is one of the Presbyterian mission projects supported by the Presbyterian Women. A box has been placed near Fellowship Hall for your donations.

AFTER APRIL 1 . . .
please re-register or register your Kroger Card at Kroger Community Rewards and list Cove Presbyterian as your recipient. It costs you nothing, you loose no money or points and the church gets a quarterly payment based on what members spend. If you do not have a computer, just contact the church office and we will gladly set-up your account for you. It only takes a few minutes. To verify that you are registered, check the bottom of your receipt – it should read – You requested Kroger to donate to COVE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

PRAYER BOXES . . .
please return your lenten prayer box to the basket on the table in the narthex.

BOARD MEMBERS . . .
remember to check and empty your mailboxes periodically. Meeting minutes and other items of importance are often put into the boxes for your reference.

BULLETIN DEADLINE . . .
if you wish to have an article published in the weekly bulletin, please have the article into the church office by Wednesday at noon. Thank you for your cooperation.

STOP IN THE CHURCH LIBRARY . . .
to view a picture of Holiday’s Cove from 1905 showing a view of Cove Church.  The picture is compliments of the Weirton Museum.

DO YOU HAVE A NEW ADDRESS,. . .
new phone number or new e-mail ? Please contact the church office so we can update our records. We like to keep everyone informed of our events.  If you don’t receive mailings from us,  we may not have your current/correct information.

REMINDER, PLEASE COVER  . . .
the top of the church’s tables before they are used for any activity. They will stain and are hard to clean, this can be avoided with a little cooperation.

GREETERS NEEDED . . .
if you would like to serve as a greeter before a Sunday morning worship service, please contact Bonnie Nichols at 304-723-5134.

WE ARE BLOGGING!
We now have six blogs that you can check out for information and on which you can leave comments. They're listed below:
• The Cove Community (www.thecovecommunity.blogspot.com) - This is for the whole church. I'll post sermons and announcements. I also invite y'all to send in material that you'd like to share with other members of the congregation. And please feel free to comment on anything you might read.
• Cove Kids (www.covekids.blogspot.com) - This is tailored for the preteen young people in our church. Again I'll post announcements. You're also invited to send in any writings, photographs and art work you'd like to post. And they don't have to all deal with the church. We also post artwork from Jesus Time.
• Glue (www.cove-glue.blogspot.com) - Our teens are running their own blog site; therefore, I have no idea what will be posted.
• Bible Talk (www.cove-bibletalk.blogspot.com) - We've established this blog to give pastors and lay people the chance to discuss Scripture. The weekly passages are from the Common Lectionary, and we're posting the pastor’s translation of the  Greek text. We want you to read any or all of the passages and to leave any comment or ask any question that you feel is appropriate. Please include any research you've done. As we share our ideas and insights, we hope that we'll all come to a better and deeper understanding of the Bible. Each passage is linked to a website that offers some informative information.
• Let’s Talk About It (www.cove-talk.blogspot.com) - Through this site, we hope to encourage a conversation on a variety of topics. Since this blog is sponsored by a church, we expect most of the issues to involve the Christian faith. Still we don't want to limit ourselves or you. If you have a topic that you'd like us to discuss, include it as a comment to a previous issue. Please phrase it as a question and offer a summary of at least two positions. We'll add a new item to discuss every three weeks. We hope this challenges you to apply your faith to issues that are important to you.
• The Bible in a Year (www.cove-bibleinayear.blogspot.com) - Each day, we'll post passages so that you can read the Bible in one year.

IT IS OFTEN DIFFICULT TO HEAR PRAYER REQUESTS . . .
on Sunday mornings. If you would like to have someone added to the prayer chain please drop a short note into the collection plate with their name and any other information you would like to share.  You may also call the church office or e-mail the church with the information.

IF YOU LEAVE AN ITEM AT  CHURCH . . .
for someone or for a specific function, please take a moment to write the information on the item.  If there is no name on the item we will assume it is for the church in general.

IN THE HOSPITAL? HOMEBOUND? RECENT ILLNESS?. . .
if you are unable to attend services and would like to arrange for a visit from  Rev. Ed Rudiger please contact the church office. Also if you would like to be included in our weekly bulletin  mailings contact the church office.

WE CAN ALWAYS DO A BETTER JOB MINISTERING . . .
to the needs within this congregation, community and world. Please feel free to offer any suggestions as comments.

LOOSE CHANGE OFFERING . . .
Session approved the Deacons collecting a “Loose Change Offering” that will be used to assist the Deacons with their utility assistance outreach program for Weirton residents or Cove Church members. We hope church members can help with the assistance program by donating some of their spare change. A container is placed in the Narthex each Sunday morning before church. The Deacons thank you for your continuing support of their projects.

VASES OF FLOWERS. . .
can be purchased for a service. The cost is  $16.00 a vase.  Silk flowers or live plants can be purchased for an additional cost. The  flower calendar is located on the far wall in the church narthex or you can telephone the church office to place your order. After the service, the flowers will be placed in a plastic vase for you to take with you.

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS. . .
newsletters from old friends  or articles about or by members of Cove Church,  check out the  bulletin board located in the hallway by the church offices.  Past event pictures are also on display in that area.

WE’RE UPDATING OUR PRAYER AND DEVOTION LINE . . .
about four times a week. If you would like to call and hear a devotional, please call 304-748-7900.

ONGOING MISSION PROJECTS . . .
• Used Can Tabs are being collected for the Ronald McDonald House in Morgantown, West Virginia. Deposit your tabs in the container located in the main hallway downstairs.
• Campbell’s Labels are being collected by the Presbyterian Women for the Weirton Christian Center.  The labels including the bar code or just the bar code can be dropped off in the container located in the main  hallway downstairs.
• Greeting Cards are being collected. Please drop off your Greeting Cards or just the front of the card in the box located in the main hallway downstairs. The cards are being sent to St. Jude’s  Ranch to be remade into cards to be sold in their gift shop.  Hallmark, Disney or American Greeting Cards can not be accepted as they are trade marked.
We thank you for your participation and support of our mission endeavors.

The Ascension of the Lord


Ascencion, par Salvador DaliThursday was the day on which we traditionally remember the Ascension, an event that Luke described in the following passage:

44Then he said to them, “These are my words that I spoke to you while I was still with you—that everything written about me in the law of Moses, the prophets, and the psalms must be fulfilled.” 45Then he opened their minds to understand the scriptures, 46and he said to them, “Thus it is written, that the Messiah is to suffer and to rise from the dead on the third day, 47and that repentance and forgiveness of sins is to be proclaimed in his name to all nations, beginning from Jerusalem. 48You are witnesses of these things. 49And see, I am sending upon you what my Father promised; so stay here in the city until you have been clothed with power from on high.”

50Then he led them out as far as Bethany, and, lifting up his hands, he blessed them. 51While he was blessing them, he withdrew from them and was carried up into heaven. 52And they worshiped him, and returned to Jerusalem with great joy; 53and they were continually in the temple blessing God.

Now, I doubt that many of us remembered this particular day, but that's not surprising. The Ascension of the Lord is by far the the most neglected day on the Christian calendar. I mean, we made a huge deal celebrating Jesus coming into human space as a baby born in Bethlehem, but we rarely give a passing thought to his return to the father. And I think that's a shame, because by remembering one and not the other we neglect what the revelationship of Jesus was all about. You see, through his coming in Bethlehem, Jesus revealed the nature of God to us. And when he ascended, he revealed us to God. You see, he brought our nature into the presence of God; therefore, when Jesus intercedes for us, he knows our pains and disappointments. God understands who we are, because God himself walked in our shoes. And that's a truth that we can celebrate because of the ascension, a day that deserves more attention and more respect.

And this is something John Donne understood in his poem Ascension:

Salute the last and everlasting day,
Joy at th' uprising of this Sun, and Son,
Ye whose true tears, or tribulation
Have purely wash'd, or burnt your drossy clay.
Behold, the Highest, parting hence away,
Lightens the dark clouds, which He treads upon ;
Nor doth He by ascending show alone,
But first He, and He first enters the way.
O strong Ram, which hast batter'd heaven for me !
Mild Lamb, which with Thy Blood hast mark'd the path !
Bright Torch, which shinest, that I the way may see !
O, with Thy own Blood quench Thy own just wrath ;
And if Thy Holy Spirit my Muse did raise,
Deign at my hands this crown of prayer and praise. 

Prayer Requests, to be shared during Sunday's worship service

On Sunday, May 20, Cove Presbyterian Church will lift the following needs to God.

Adults
Alden Edwards
Andrea Vincent
Andy DiRemigio
Ann Berach
Anthony Calpo
Beverly Zeff
Bob Saffle
Bobby Leonard
Boipelo Mooketsi
Carol Kraina Mowl
Charles Saffle
Christy Cybulski
Connie Francis
Dave Bever
David Potter
Diane Szymanek
Domenick Notarantanio 
Don & Greta Billham
Doug Friends
Ed Gray
Ed Roach
Eric Minor
Jan Moncrief
Jennifer Dahlem
Jessica Hibbs & her newborn son Luka
Jim Hanna
Joan Gallagher
Joanne Westbrook
Jodi Lauttamus
John Brothers
Joshua Crow
Judy Dobbins
Judy Lindquist
Judy Mason
Karen & her son Daniel
Kelly Stephens
Lindsey Ward
Maurene Roth
Michelle Hano
Millie Randolph
Mr. & Mrs. Mario Whitehead & Joyce
Nick Palavis
Nora Coleman
Paul Maine
Paul Rosnick
Peggy Murphy
Penny Mourat
Rachael
Rhonda Bruich
Rich Jeffers
Richard Redfern 
Ron Sekersky
Roxie Sosenko
Sally Robinson
Sherry VanGilder
Susan Ponville
T.J. Croft
Virginia & Paul Welch

Children
Aksel Ace
Audri King
Brandon Wares
Brody McUmor
Emily Icard 
Hunter Stafford
Jeffrey Konovich
Jonah Becker
Justus Loughry
Kya Schwertfeger
Kylee Leathers
McKenna Popish
Michael Liptak
Shelby Kamarec
Zoe Purcell

Military
Chris Cameron
Jonathan Criss
Kendra Mader 
Michael Criss
Stephen Mader 

Bereaved Family
The John Kuntz family

Church Families
Allison, John & Ella Dietz
Lynn & Edalo Dintini
Rhonda Donahoo

Local Church
First United Methodist Church

Special Friends
Harry Hutch - Villa Vista, Rm 507 B, 1800 Sinclair Ave, Steubenville, OH  43953 

Presbyterian Bodies
The Stewardship Committee - Jim Cochran, Chairperson
Stewardship Education Task Force - Stan Fedyszyn, Chairperson
Synod Commissioner - Robert Nagy

Also Remember in Your Prayers
Alice Orr - Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV  26062
Bob Morgan - Weirton Geriatric Center, , 2526 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Harry Hutch - Villa Vista, Room 507, 1800 Sinclair Ave, Steubenville, OH 43953
Jim Hanna - Weirton Geriatric Center
Marge Black - Weirton Geriatric Center, Room 223, 2528 Pennsylvania Ave , Weirton, WV 26062
Mike Valiga - Weirton Geriatric Center, 2530 Pennsylvania Ave, Weirton, WV 26062
Thelma Longacre - Chambrel at Montrose, Unit 210, 100 Brookmont Rd, Akron, OH 44333-3091