Saturday, September 29, 2012

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - Old Water


Isaiah 43:18-21

Do not remember the former things, or consider the things of old. I am about to do a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not perceive it? I will make a way in the wilderness and rivers in the desert. The wild animals will honor me, the jackals and the ostriches; for I give water in the wilderness, rivers in the desert, to give drink to my chosen people, the people whom I formed for myself so that they might declare my praise.

A Devotion by Brad Reeves (Texas, USA)

My daughter scowled. “Is this old water?” she asked. Before carrying bottled water was common, we kept plastic water canteens in our car as we traveled the long distances between towns in West Texas and eastern New Mexico. However, when we did not replace the water for a while, what had once been refreshing began to taste like stale plastic. My daughter, wanting refreshment, refused to drink old water.

As with the old water in our canteens, many times we offer to our friends, fellow Christians, and even ourselves the old work of God in our lives. Our relationship with God was fresh — once, but it has become stale. Yes, there might be enough power still there to save someone who is about to die of spiritual thirst. But our faith is not vibrant, refreshing Living Water.

When my relationship with God goes stale, it first shows inside me. I begin to refer to my experience with God in the past tense, and I feel discontent. Then the staleness shows in the way I interact with my family, friends, and acquaintances. I am less at peace, less patient, and more irritable. At these times I need to pray, read the Bible, and ask the Holy Spirit to examine me for sin. My connection with God can become fresh again as I read a devotional book, serve others in Jesus’ name, and worship. My soul doesn’t like old water either. No soul does.

From The Upper Room.

Friday, September 28, 2012

Cove’s Bulletin for Sunday, September 30, 2012

Below is a copy of Sunday’s bulletin. I’ll preach from James 5:13-20, and the title of the sermon is “Why We Pray.” I hope to see you Sunday.









Prayer Requests, to be shared during Sunday’s worship service


On Sunday, September 30, Cove Presbyterian Church will lift the following needs to God.

Adults
Alden & Delores Edwards
Alicia Parr
Andrea Vincent
Andy DiRemigio
Bill Moulds
Bob Saffle
Bobby Leonard
Carol Levesque
Charles Saffle
Chrissy Zatta
Christy Cybulski
Connie Francis
Diane Szymanek
Dick Bonyak
Dinny Walford
Domenick Notarantanio
Doug Friends
Emery Edwards
Ethel Grubner
James Mitts
Jamie Edwards
Jan Moncrief
Jason Hammon
Jeff Grant
Jesse Lescallette
Jim Hanna
Joan Gallagher
Joanne Westbrook
John Brothers
John Ross
Joshua Crow
Judy Mason
Kelly Stephens
Lindsey Ward
Marjie Dinges
Martha Meadows
Mary Ola Taflan
Maurene Roth
Michelle Hano
Mr. & Mrs. Mario Whitehead & Joyce
Nick Palavis
Paul Moore
Peggy Murphy
Penny Mourat
Rhonda Bruich
Rich Jeffers
Richard Redfern
Rick Swain
Rose Sanders
Ruth Coates
Susan Ponville
Todd Majoris
Turner Family
Virginia & Paul Welch
Virginia Marston

Children
Aksel Ace
Audri King
Brandon Wares
Brody McUmor
Danielle Phillips
Emily Icard
Hunter Stafford
Jeffrey Konovich
Jonah Becker
Jonathan Marte
Justus Loughry
Kade Haines
Kya Schwertfeger
Kylee Leathers
Lily Ghrist
McKenna Popish
Michael Liptak
Shelby Kamarec
Zoe Purcell

Military
Chris Cameron
Jason Kerr
Jonathan Criss
Michael Criss
Stephen Mader

In the Hospital
Ronnie Taflan – Shadyside

Bereaved Families
Family of Paul Maine

Church Families
Laura Lewis
Suellen Lewis
Jim & Carolyn Longacre

Local Church
Faith Baptist Church

Special Friend
Kitty Heilman – 1215 Glencairn Rd., Weirton, WV  26062-4323

Presbyterian Churches
Ridge Presbyterian Church, Jewett, Ohio – Rev. John Visser
Bethel Presbyterian Church, Key, Ohio – Elder Kurt Turner

Also Remember in Your Prayers
Alice Orr – Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton WV  26062
Bob Morgan – Weirton Geriatric Center, 2526 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton, WV  26062
Harry Hutch – Villa Vista, Room 507, 1800 Sinclair Ave., Steubenville, OH  43953
Jim Hanna – Weirton Geriatric Center
Marge Black – Weirton Geriatric Center, Room 223, 2528 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton, WV 26062
Mike Valiga – Weirton Geriatric Center, 2530 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton, WV  26062
Thelma Longacre – Chambrel at Montrose, Unit 210, 100 Brookmont Rd., Akron, OH  44333-3091

What's Happening at Cove Presbyterian Church?

Below are the announcements as they appear in Sunday's bulletin.


OUR SYMPATHY . . .
Is extended to the family of Paul Lewis  Maine, husband of Deana & father of Jenna who died on Monday, September 24, 2012. Paul became a member of the Cove Family on April 14, 1965.

DON’T FORGET SUNDAY SCHOOL  . . .
we meet every Sunday morning at 9:45 a.m.  Think about trying out one of our classes. We have a variety of classes to choose from to fit your needs.

THEY’LL BE A BRIEF SESSION MEETING . . .
today, immediately after the worship service.

DEACONS MONTHLY MEETING . . .
Monday, October 1 at 7:00 p.m. in the board room.

CONGRATULATION MYRTLE MCHENDRY CLASS . . .
on your 90th Anniversary which will be observed this Tuesday, October 2 beginning at 5:00 p.m. with a sit down dinner. Following dinner will be  an evening of music and inspiration by Marvin Whiteman. Mr Whiteman will share his testimony of his sightless life through singing and  playing piano. He will also share many old memorable tunes.  All men and women of the congregation are welcome to join us for our musical program.  The Myrtle McHendry Class has held classes every Sunday morning throughout all those years and holds a social meeting eight times a year.

CHANCEL CHOIR WILL PRACTICE . . .
on Wednesday, October 3 at 6:45 p.m. in the sanctuary. New member are welcome to join!!

THE BROWN BAG BIBLE STUDY . . .
will meet Thursday, October 4 at 12:30 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. We’ll look at 2 Corinthians 4:1–5:10.

WORLD COMMUNION SUNDAY . .
will be observed next Sunday, October  7, 2012 during the morning worship.

TRUSTEES MONTHLY MEETING . . .
Monday, October 8 at 6:30 p.m. in the board room. BOARD OF SESSION . . .
will meet on Tuesday, October 9 at 6:30 p.m. for their monthly meeting in the board room.

PASTOR RUDIGER WILL A STUDY OF ISLAM . . .
Sunday, September 14, beginning at 2:00.

PRESBYTERIAN WOMEN’S MONTHLY MEETING . ..
will be held on Wednesday, October 17 at noon in Fellowship Hall. There will be no Executive Board Meeting in October. You are requested  to bring a bagged lunch.  We will continue our Bible Study on The General Epistles. All ladies are  welcome to join us as we study God’s Word in Christian Fellowship.

PAPER PRODUCT NEEDED . . .
Deacon’s Challenge -  to all groups within Cove Church,
WE NEED YOUR HELP!!
The Food Pantry is in desperate need of paper products for our Thanksgiving and Christmas Baskets. We need unopened single rolls of paper towels, toilet tissue- 4 roll packages, liquid or bar soap, facial tissue, shampoo or conditioner.  We’re getting creative, each group wishing to participate is to contact Kayla Violet with their group name by Sunday, October 28th. Then on Challenge Sunday, November 4th each group will have a different display in the narthex. The congregation will then be asked to vote for the most unique display and the winning group will receive a pumpkin pie as a thank you from the deacons. If you have any questions or need more information contact Kayla Violet at 304-374-6805.

EXTERIOR DOORS . . .
at times do not close properly or completely, we are asking everyone to please take a moment to check to be certain the doors are completely closed behind you. This suggestion is for everyone’s safety and also the security of our building.

BULLETIN DEADLINE . . .
if you wish to have an article published in the weekly bulletin, please have the article into the church office by Wednesday at noon. Thank you for your cooperation.

DO YOU HAVE A NEW ADDRESS,. . .
new phone number or new e-mail ? Please contact the church office so we can update our records. We like to keep everyone informed of our events.  If you don’t receive mailings from us,  we may not have your current/correct information.

REMINDER, PLEASE COVER  . . .
the top of the church’s tables before they are used for any activity. They will stain and are hard to clean, this can be avoided with a little cooperation.

GREETERS NEEDED . . .
if you would like to serve as a greeter before a Sunday morning worship service, please contact Bonnie Nichols at 304-723-5134.

WE ARE BLOGGING!
We now have six blogs that you can check out for information and on which you can leave comments. They're listed below:
The Cove Community (www.thecovecommunity.blogspot.com) - This is for the whole church. I'll post sermons and announcements. I also invite y'all to send in material that you'd like to share with other members of the congregation. And please feel free to comment on anything you might read.
Cove Kids (www.covekids.blogspot.com) - This is tailored for the preteen young people in our church. Again I'll post announcements. You're also invited to send in any writings, photographs and art work you'd like to post. And they don't have to all deal with the church. We also post artwork from Jesus Time.
Glue (www.cove-glue.blogspot.com) - Our teens are running their own blog site; therefore, I have no idea what will be posted.
Bible Talk (www.cove-bibletalk.blogspot.com) - We've established this blog to give pastors and lay people the chance to discuss Scripture. The weekly passages are from the Common Lectionary, and we're posting the pastor’s translation of the  Greek text. We want you to read any or all of the passages and to leave any comment or ask any question that you feel is appropriate. Please include any research you've done. As we share our ideas and insights, we hope that we'll all come to a better and deeper understanding of the Bible. Each passage is linked to a website that offers some informative information.
Let’s Talk About It (www.cove-talk.blogspot.com) - Through this site, we hope to encourage a conversation on a variety of topics. Since this blog is sponsored by a church, we expect most of the issues to involve the Christian faith. Still we don't want to limit ourselves or you. If you have a topic that you'd like us to discuss, include it as a comment to a previous issue. Please phrase it as a question and offer a summary of at least two positions. We'll add a new item to discuss every three weeks. We hope this challenges you to apply your faith to issues that are important to you.
The Bible in a Year (www.cove-bibleinayear.blogspot.com) - Each day, we'll post passages so that you can read the Bible in one year.

CHRISTMAS IN NOVEMBER . . .
is being sponsored by the Myrtle McHendry Class on Friday, November 16th and Saturday, November 17. The ladies are accepting holiday decorations and new or gently used items that can be used or given as gifts. The items can be dropped off at the church at anytime, just mark what they are for and we will pass them along. Cemetery pillows will also be for sale.

IT IS OFTEN DIFFICULT TO HEAR PRAYER REQUESTS . . .
on Sunday mornings. If you would like to have someone added to the prayer chain please drop a short note into the collection plate with their name and any other information you would like to share.  You may also call the church office or e-mail the church with the information.

IF YOU LEAVE AN ITEM AT  CHURCH . . .
for someone or for a specific function, please take a moment to write the information on the item.  If there is no information on the item we will assume it is for the church in general.

IN THE HOSPITAL? HOMEBOUND? RECENT ILLNESS?. . .
if you are unable to attend services and would like to arrange for a visit from Rev. Ed Rudiger please contact the church office. Also if you would like to receive copies of the Sunday Bulletin contact the church office.  

WE CAN ALWAYS DO A BETTER JOB MINISTERING . . .
to the needs within this congregation, community and world. Please feel free to offer any suggestions as comments.

LOOSE CHANGE OFFERING . . .
Session approved the Deacons collecting a “Loose Change Offering” that will be used to assist the Deacons with their utility assistance outreach program for Weirton residents or Cove Church members. We hope church members can help with the assistance program by donating some of their spare change. A container is placed in the Narthex each Sunday morning before church. The Deacons thank you for your continuing support of their projects.

VASES OF FLOWERS. . .
can be purchased for a service. The cost is  $16.00 a vase.  Silk flowers or live plants can be purchased for an additional cost. The  flower calendar is located on the far wall in the church narthex or you can telephone the church office to place your order. After the service, the flowers will be placed in a plastic vase for you to take with you.

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS. . .
newsletters from old friends  or articles about or by members of Cove Church,  check out the  bulletin board located in the hallway by the church offices.  Past event pictures are also on display in that area.

WE’RE UPDATING OUR PRAYER AND DEVOTION LINE . . .
about four times a week. If you would like to call and hear a devotional, please call 304-748-7900.

ONGOING MISSION PROJECTS . . .
Campbell’s Labels are being collected by the Presbyterian Women for the Weirton Christian Center.  The labels including the bar code or just the bar code can be dropped off in the container located in the main  hallway downstairs.
Greeting Cards are being collected. Please drop off your Greeting Cards or just the front of the card in the box located in the main hallway downstairs. The cards are being sent to St. Jude’s  Ranch to be remade into cards to be sold in their gift shop.  Hallmark, Disney or American Greeting Cards can not be accepted as they are trade marked.
Can Tabs are being collected for the Ronald McDonald House in Morgantown, West Virginia. Deposit your tabs in the container locate in the main hallway downstairs.  FYI - recently 60 pounds of tabs were sent to the Ronald McDonald House.
We thank you for your participation and support of our mission endeavors.

A Reconsidered View of Religions



In light of the recent violence that’s rocked the Middle East, I think it’s important for us to consider and reconsider how we, as Christians, relate to the different religious traditions in our world. In order to apply Christ’s command to love both our God and our neighbor, we may need to change how we view and describe other religions. But let me be clear; I’m not suggesting that we abandon or compromise what we believe. I’m not sure we can be faithful to the one who taught that "there’s no way to the father but by me" while also accepting that all religious perspectives are equally valid. Still, I believe that we can view others with respect, even those with whom we disagree. And we can seek out opportunities to learn what they believe, rather than simply trusting those who speak the loudest.

With this in mind, below I’ve printed an article by Lauren Markoe, Religion News Service entitled Obama at the U.N.: A new religion doctrine. I hope this offers us a place to start a new kind of discussion.


President Obama on Tuesday (Sept. 25) gave a forceful speech at the United Nations, in which he challenged much of the world’s assumptions about free speech and religion.

Here are five points from his address, which together, add up to as close to an Obama Doctrine on Religion as we've seen:

1. Blasphemy must be tolerated, however intolerable
The idea that the U.S. protects even vile speech, so ingrained in American culture, seems counterintuitive to much of the world. It’s an especially tough concept when speech targets a religion, but Obama argued that restrictions on speech too often become weapons to suppress religion ― especially the rights of religious minorities.

“Given the power of faith in our lives, and the passions that religious differences can inflame, the strongest weapon against hateful speech is not repression, it is more speech,” Obama said.

Moreover, he continued, no one can control speech even if he or she wanted to.

“When anyone with a cell phone can spread offensive views around the world with the click of a button, the notion that we can control the flow of information is obsolete,” Obama said.

2. Religious respect is a two-way street
Obama went on the offensive: If you’re going to denounce intolerance against your own religion, he said, you must also call out those who demean the religion of others.

“The future must not belong to those who slander the prophet of Islam,” the president said. “Yet to be credible, those who condemn that slander must also condemn the hate we see when the image of Jesus Christ is desecrated, churches are destroyed, or the Holocaust is denied.”

 3. Turn the other cheek
In the wake of riots across the Muslim world sparked by the anti-Muslim film “The Innocence of Muslims,” Obama called violence an illegitimate reaction to offensive speech, religious or otherwise.

“There are no words that excuse the killing of innocents. There is no video that justifies an attack on an embassy. There is no slander that provides an excuse for people to burn a restaurant in Lebanon, or destroy a school in Tunis, or cause death and destruction in Pakistan.”

4. One nation under God
Obama drew on the religious diversity of the U.S. to make his case for tolerance abroad.

“We are a country that has welcomed people of every race and religion. We are home to Muslims who worship across our country,” he said. “We understand why people take offense to this video because millions of our citizens are among them.”

Religion scholar Diana Butler Bass said the president went further, presenting a modern vision of American exceptionalism from which the rest of the world can learn, “where the U.S. is uniquely positioned to offer a vision of pluralism.”

“It’s a compelling explanation of what America can be in a diverse and connected world,” she said.

5. The danger of extremismThe democratic movements sweeping the Arab world could be derailed by intolerance rooted in religious difference, Obama warned. He made the preservation of the Arab Spring a global responsibility.

“It is time to marginalize those who ― even when not resorting to violence ― use hatred of America, or the West, or Israel as a central principle of politics,” he said. “For that only gives cover, and sometimes makes excuses, for those who resort to violence.”

I also think this poem by Egal Bohen might also offer some direction and hope.

When we are angry at mankind
Or rave at some depravity of mind
When we would curse behaviour of a kind
To argue, rather than to view benign
It is with our own self we battle wage
When choosing not to understand, nor to engage
With that from which we isolate our self
With anger sent, to where, perhaps is needed help
Lest fearful, reason may just find the time
With tenderness, to enter in our mind.
And so it is perhaps from loss of our own face
We are so quick to shout of their disgrace
But we should not lose sight of our own sins
Though, in different colours dressed, appear they in
For is not all, of nature in this life?
The good, the bad, together, love, and strife
As nature, this is how such things will be
So it is not how loud we shout, but what we see
And seeing do, to help, to liberate
To free with tolerance, not shut the gate
That is
How it should be

Thursday, September 27, 2012

Cove Newsletter Article - When We Vote


Since this newsletter is for October and November, by the time we send out another the presidential election will be over and we’ll looking forward either to President Obama’s second term or President-elect Romney’s first. Before we get there, though, we’ve got another month of campaigning. And sadly, up to this point, I’ve been overwhelmed by the general negative tone. Both sides seem to focus on why I shouldn’t vote for the other guy. I’ve got only a vague understanding of the positive things either will do. I’m constantly being told why I should be afraid if the other person wins. Name calling has replaced issue discussing. And although this appears to be the way elections are waged now-a-days, I think this year has been particularly nasty. I don’t think I’ve ever heard the kind of hatred expressed about a sitting or a potential president as I’ve heard this year, with these almost apocalyptic imagines being used if one or the other wins. And although both sides seem to suggest that there’s really only one genuine Christian candidate, I don’t think the rhetoric hasn’t made things easier to decide.

So as a believer who’s wading through the accusations, assumptions and rumors, I think there are a few things that Christians should remember as they prepare to vote.

First, no candidate for a secular, political office can promote a purely Christian agenda, because if they did, they wouldn’t get many votes, even from believers. I mean, I’m not sure that we want a leader who’s economic policy is shaped by what Jesus told the rich man, “If you wish to be perfect, go, sell your possessions, and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.” And just imagine a foreign policy grounded not in national security but rather the principle of “turn the other cheek” and “go the second mile.” Now I recognize that when Jesus taught these things he wasn’t outlining political policy that would apply to a nation. Still, he spent more time dealing with money than personal morality, and most of his ideas we’d label more extreme than radical or totally impractical if applied to a country. I think the reality is that what Jesus taught brings all systems and governments under judgement, because regardless of what their currency might say, most trust in themselves, their history, their system, and their laws more than in God. Whenever I hear someone being promoted as the Christian candidate, I get nervous, because frankly I’m not sure a person can win an election by following these words of Jesus: “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me.”

Second, regardless of who wins, God is still in control. As I wrote, I’ve heard these horrible imagines associated with both candidates, as though how we vote will either hasten or delay the apocalypse. To believe this, we’d have to also believe that we’re in control and that God is dependent on our actions. I just don’t see that in scripture.

Finally, the church must be bigger than partisan politics. I mean, if the body of Christ becomes affiliated with a political party or a political agenda, I think we cease being the body of Christ. Our focus is on Jesus and his example. But having said that, if he were alive today, I don’t know if he’d be a liberal or a conservative, a democrat or a republican. I don’t know if he’d want taxes or gun availability to be higher or lower. And I sure don’t know if he’d drive a Hummer or a Smart Car. I don’t know. But I think sincere Christians can be on either side of many fences and still share a common faith in Christ. Since the country seems to be divided about 50/50 politically, I think we narrow our proclamation of God’s grace and love when we make the decision to exclude half the population. What draws us together should be stronger than our voting record.

As I look at myself, my faith in Jesus Christ will certainly shape my vote in the upcoming election. I’ll vote for the person whom I believe best reflects the values taught by my savior. I’ll also select the individual whom I think offers the best future for our children. I hope you have a similar perspective, but I recognize that we may end up voting for different men. But even though we may disagree, we can still respect one another, because we’re brothers and sisters in Christ. And since we can’t frustrate the will of God, we can be assured that, regardless of who wins, our future is securely in God’s hands.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Sunday's Minute for Mission - Evangelism


Members of a small church group at MacLand Presbyterian Church in Powder Springs, Georgia, were meeting for prayer, Bible study, and fellowship, when they discovered that more than 75 homeless people were living in the woods nearby. The group decided to take breakfast to the homeless people on Sunday mornings. Pat and Scott Shankle were among those who drove to the woods to serve food one Sunday. “That’s when I felt God nudging my heart,” Pat says. She sensed God telling her to invite Perry, one of the homeless men, to church. So she did. “He and another man got in the car with us. My husband was like, ‘What are you doing? Are you crazy?’”

What Shankle didn’t know was that Perry was schizophrenic. During the sermon, Perry began to fiddle in his pockets. Suddenly he got up and ran toward the front of the church. Scott Shankle got up and ran after him, whispering, “What are you doing?” “I want to give, I want to give,” Perry told Scott Shankle, and he laid a coin near the choir loft. It was when he turned around with his incredible smile that Shankle saw the gift he had given – lying at the front of the sanctuary was a gold token from a Chuck E. Cheese’s pizza restaurant.

What the Shankles experienced with Perry helped change what they thought about evangelism. “I grew up thinking God would never accept me because I’m so imperfect,” says Pat Shankle. “I realize that we're all broken but part of God’s human family. Increasingly, I think evangelism is being present to all of those we encounter in our daily lives, embracing them with the same love and kindness God embraces us with through Jesus.”

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

Remember Our Brother Paul Maine


November 14, 1954 - September 24, 2012 

PAUL L. MAINE, 57 of Weirton, WV passed away in the early morning hours of Monday September 24, 2012. After a year long battle with pancreatic cancer and surrounded by a loving family, Paul was called home to be with the Lord. He was born November 14, 1954 in Weirton, WV. Preceded in death by his parents, John W. and Julia Nagy Maine. Paul is survived by his devoted wife, Deana Townsend Maine, daughter; Jenna Jo Maine, brother; John "Mike" Maine(Lynn) of Eustis, FL, sisters; Judi L. VanHorn and Nancy L. Sciaraffa of Houston, TX, Charlene M. Sayre(Dennis) of Chesapeake, WV. A life-long resident of Weirton, where in his youth, Paul enjoyed his membership in Boy Scout Troop 34, the WEIR High Varsity band, and his continued membership of Cove Presbyterian Church. Paul served his community as a successful business manager of Windmill Electronics, Nationwise Auto Parts, Advanced Auto, and retired from his automotive career at Brodhead Auto in Aliquippa, PA. He served the youth of Hancock County as a former advisory board member at the John D. Rockefeller IV Career Center in automotive technology. Visitation will be at the Steel & Wolfe Funeral Home, Inc., 380 Penco Road, Weirton, WV on Thursday from 2-4 & 6-8 where funeral services will be held Friday at 11:00 a.m. with Dr. J.E. Rudiger presiding. Burial will follow at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, Paul respectfully requested that donations be made to the Tony Teramana Cancer Center, 3204 John son Road, Steubenville, OH 43952 OR gifts to assist his family with medical expenses. www.steelandwolfe.com

Visitation

Visitation will be at the Steel & Wolfe Funeral Home, Inc., 380 Penco Road, Weirton, WV on Thursday from 2-4 & 6-8 where funeral services will be held Friday at 11:00 a.m. with Dr. J.E. Rudiger presiding.

Interment

Burial will follow at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens.

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - A Strong Arm


Isaiah 41:8-13 

But you, Israel, my servant, Jacob, whom I have chosen, the offspring of Abraham, my friend; you whom I took from the ends of the earth, and called from its farthest corners, saying to you, “You are my servant, I have chosen you and not cast you off”; do not fear, for I am with you, do not be afraid, for I am your God; I will strengthen you, I will help you, I will uphold you with my victorious right hand. Yes, all who are incensed against you shall be ashamed and disgraced; those who strive against you shall be as nothing and shall perish. You shall seek those who contend with you, but you shall not find them; those who war against you shall be as nothing at all. For I, the LORD your God, hold your right hand; it is I who say to you, “Do not fear, I will help you.”

A Devotion by Karen E. Brown (Mississippi, USA) 

After I lost my vision, I learned sighted-guide techniques, in which the blind person holds a sighted person’s arm just above the elbow and follows the sighted guide. Later I received training with guide dogs. The blind person holds the dog’s harness handle with the left hand, which leaves the right hand free to open doors, carry a purse or bag, or hold a child’s hand. In recent years, I have not had a dog guide. I often use sighted-guide assistance from my husband, friends, and family members. Having become accustomed to holding a guide dog’s harness with my left hand, I prefer to hold my guide’s right arm. It seems the most natural and comfortable way to travel.

One day during my scripture reading, I noticed a reference to God’s “strong right arm.” For me, this image of God as my guide in life, alongside me to keep me safe and secure, brought me comfort. This reference to God’s strong right arm, spoke to my need for reassurance. I began to find similar references again and again as I read the Bible. I thank God for being with me in all circumstances, guiding my way. I know that I can depend on God’s leading me with love and care.

From The Upper Room.

Sunday, September 23, 2012

Sunday's Sermon - Solving Life’s Problems


James 3:13–4:3, 7-8a

13Who is wise and understanding among you? Show by a good way of life that his works are done in unassuming wisdom. 14But if you have bitter zeal and ambition in your heart, then don’t be boastful and give lie to the truth.15This “wisdom” doesn’t come down from above but is earthly, natural, diabolical. 16For where there is zeal and ambition, there is disorder and all kinds of worthless deeds. 17But the wisdom from above is first pure then peaceable, considerate, obedient, full of mercy and good fruits, impartial, sincere. 18And the fruit of righteousness in peace is sown by those who make peace. 1From where do the wars and fights among you come? From here, from your pleasures that battle in your members, don’t they? 2You desire and you don’t have. You murder and covet and you’re not able to attain. You fight and go to war. You don’t have because you don’t petition. 3You ask and you don’t receive because your petitions reflect bad motives, so that on your pleasures, you spend. 7Now submit yourselves to God, and resist the Devil and he will flee from you. 8Draw near to God and he will draw near to you.


Solving Life’s Problems

You know, it seems to me that we could avoid a lot of the problems we face if we would just the change a few things in our lives. Now, I think we all kind of know that anyway, but I had a first-hand reminder yesterday. You see, yesterday was my wedding anniversary, and although it may not be up there with falling in love with my Indianapolis Colts, it’s still really important. And what’s more, it requires a lot more preparation and care. I mean, let’s face it, if a guy blows his anniversary, he won’t be enjoying much football for a while. And based on my track record, things really didn’t look good.

But this year, well, I thought it would be different. Good night, I actually remembered it was on September 22. And because of that, all that stuff like gifts and plans, well, remembering gave me the time I needed. Finally, unlike some of the others, this would be an anniversary for which I wouldn’t be apologizing. And you know, right there may have been where I made my big mistake; I just, plain got cocky. Now, there’s something you need to understand about me. I’m a compulsive list maker. I make lists in my sleep, and I’ll tell you, those lists are specific. As a matter of fact, I can show you the fifteen things I need to do today, one of which I’m doing right now. Of course, there’s a reason I make lists. If I don’t, I tend either to forget what I need to do or, when I remember, to wait until it’s too late to do it right. Well, let’s just say I didn’t put “buy anniversary card” or “buy anniversary gift” or “plan anniversary dinner” on my “to do” list, and so...yesterday, after Maggie’s soccer game, I hit Hallmark and bought a gift and a card. And although they may have been better if I hadn’t waited until the day of, they were an improvement over what usually happens around Christmas. I mean, have y’all ever noticed how picked over the cards are on December 24 and as to gifts, only gas stations are open on December 25. But be-that-as-it-may, once again, my anniversary wasn’t what I wanted, and I know I have only myself to blame. Y’all probably need to start praying for Debbie.

But you know, when you think about it, I believe that kind of thing happens to all of us. I mean, even if y’all are better with “special days” than me, let’s face it; a lot of the trouble we face is really of our own creation and design, isn’t it? Of course, I’ve got a gut feeling we all know some of ways those problems are created.

I mean, just think about all the trouble we’ve gotten into by what we’ve said or maybe more often, what we’ve forgotten to say. For example, a lot of folks have gotten into their heads that they can say anything they want just so long as they believe it’s true. And so they say it. They pass on that rumor that may or may not be based on fact. They share that little bit of hearsay that could assassinate a character or mislead a group. And they cause with the words they use a bunch of hurt feelings and a string of confused and frustrated people, but that’s alright, because they believed what they said was true. I’ll tell you, that’s a problem, but it’s no greater than staying silent when the gossip or the innuendo washes by. I think we all know that a lot of the trouble we face is caused by both our words and silence.

But I think it’s also caused by our action and inaction. I mean, give me a break, I think we all pretty much know what to do. It’s right there in the Bible. We’re called to love our neighbor as ourselves, right? And who is our neighbor? Well, Jesus was pretty clear about that too, especially when he pointed to the one who had a need, you know, the guy who’d been beaten up and left for dead on the road to Jericho, the person who was eventually shown kindness by the Good Samaritan. That guy who was left bleeding in the ditch, he’s our neighbor, right? And so, what are we suppose to do? Well, it’s not to cross the street, is it? No, as James reminded us, we’re expected to do more than just feel sorry for him or to wish him well or even to pray for him. Remember, he wrote, “If a brother or sister is naked and lacks daily food, and one of you says to them, ‘Go in peace; keep warm and eat your fill,’ and yet you do not supply their bodily needs, what is the good of that? So faith by itself, if it has no works, is dead.” I’m telling you, what we do and left undone matters.

And so does what we trust and ignore, and now I’m talking about something a little more spiritual. You know, sometimes our faith, you know, what we really trust on the inside, can get us into trouble. I mean, a lot of Christians talk a big game and use a whole bunch of spiritual language, but when you cut through the jargon, what they trust is no different from what the world teaches: that winners come in first, that we have rights even though that may mean that they don’t, that the guy with the most stuff wins, right? Let me ask you, if this is what we believe, it doesn’t matter what it says on our money, in whom do we really trust? Well, it’s not the one who taught that the first will be last or that we should turn the other cheek or that “if any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it.” I’ll tell you, I think it’s this kind of business that gets us into trouble.

And you know, that’s why I believe what James wrote in this letter and in particular this passage is so important, and I’ll tell you why. Right here I think he offers three ideas that just might make our lives a lot easier. In other words, according to James, we can avoid some of the problems we face in life by doing three things, and here they are: we can smarten up, we can let go, and we can draw near.

You see, first, according to James, we can simply smarten up, which may mean putting aside some of the arrogance that masquerades as wisdom so that we can follow a path that really makes sense. And I’ll tell you, I think that’s exactly what he was getting at when he wrote, “Who is wise and understanding among you? Show by a good way of life that his works are done in unassuming wisdom. But if you have bitter zeal and ambition in your heart, then don’t be boastful and give lie to the truth. This ‘wisdom’ doesn’t come down from above but is earthly, natural, diabolical. For where there is zeal and ambition, there is disorder and all kinds of worthless deeds. But the wisdom from above is first pure then peaceable, considerate, obedient, full of mercy and good fruits, impartial, sincere. And the fruit of righteousness in peace is sown by those who make peace.” You know, separating what is truly wise from what isn’t, well, it’s really not rocket science. In fact, I bet everybody here this morning can do it. You tell me, which statement reflects a righteousness kind of wisdom: a comment that’s aggressive and ambitious, one that’s kind of boastful and exaggerated, the kind of comment that divides and angers and hurts or one that’s kind and considerate, one that’s merciful and open, I’m talking about one that actually leads to something good and positive? Now, if you want to a wise guy in the sight of God, which are you going to say? I’ll tell you, if we want to avoid some of the trouble we create for ourselves, we may need to smarten up. That’s one.

And second, we also may need to let go, and I’m talking about letting go of some of our desires. Remember, James wrote, “From where do the wars and fights among you come? From here, from your pleasures that battle in your members, don’t they? You desire and you don’t have. You murder and covet and you’re not able to attain. You fight and go to war. You don’t have because you don’t petition. You ask and you don’t receive because your petitions reflect bad motives, so that on your pleasures, you spend.” In other words, I think we’ll feel better if we can get our desire for personal pleasures under control. Now that’s what James wrote, but you know, this wasn’t radical and new in his time nor in ours. In fact, the focus of Buddhism, a philosophy much older than Christianity, is on how we might live better by wanting less. You see, the Buddha taught that we suffer because we always want more than we have. And so we fight and scrap to get as much as we can. The problem, though, is we can never get enough. Therefore, the answer to suffering isn’t getting more; it’s wanting less. And that’s really what James is saying here. We’ll create a lot less trouble for ourselves when we stop focusing on ourselves and fighting for what we can get and start helping others and living for what we can give. We need to let go. And that’s two.

And third, if we want to live less troubled lives, we need to draw near to God. James wrote, “Now submit yourselves to God, and resist the Devil and he will flee from you. Draw near to God and he will draw near to you.” You see, right now we have a choice. We can choose to trust that what the world teaches is right and we can choose to believe that we control the future and we can choose to run along with the crowd and follow whatever sounds good right now. Or we can choose to trust the one who has spoken, is speaking and will continue to speak to us through his word and we can choose to believe that someone a whole lot stronger than us is ultimately in control of the universe and we can choose to turn from what’s politically correct and socially comfortable and follow the one who taught that ever commandment in the entire Bible is focused on love for God and love for neighbor and if that’s not how I see it or apply it, then I’m wrong in my interpretation. You see, we can choose to resist the tempter, the distractor, and draw near to God, the one who loved us before the foundation of the earth. And I’ll tell you, when we do, I believe our “trouble meter” will go down. And that’s three.

As every husband knows, anniversaries are like unexploded bombs, and yesterday, mine kind of blew up in my face. But it wasn’t like I got into big trouble; it’s just that it could have been so much better. I guess I’ll have another chance to get it right at Christmas, that is, if the Mayans are wrong.
Yesterday, I made my life harder than it needed to be. And you know, that’s really the way it is with life. Although we might be able to muddle along with our words and actions and trust, I believe that life could be so much better if we smartened up, let go and drew near. Just doing that may solve a lot of life’s problems.

Saturday, September 22, 2012

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - Watched Over


Psalm 121 

I lift up my eyes to the hills–from where will my help come?
My help comes from the LORD, who made heaven and earth.
He will not let your foot be moved; he who keeps you will not slumber.
He who keeps Israel will neither slumber nor sleep.
The LORD is your keeper; the LORD is your shade at your right hand.
The sun shall not strike you by day, nor the moon by night.
The LORD will keep you from all evil; he will keep your life.
The LORD will keep your going out and your coming in from this time on and forevermore.


A Devotion by Mabel M. de Varas (Arica and Parinacota, Chile)

On a summer afternoon our family went to the beach. Our two small daughters were enjoying the sand and sea. They played for quite a while, oblivious to the growing mass of people setting up beach umbrellas all around them.

When the girls decided to return to us, they could not tell exactly where they were. But we were watching them. They looked disoriented, momentarily paralyzed. Their father quickly set out to get them. They were never in danger and never out of our sight.

As children of God, we may frequently find ourselves feeling lost and disoriented. In a sea of confusion, how good it is to know that God is vigilant and nearby! God knows how we feel and what we are facing. And God, our protector, loves us and watches over us.

From The Upper Room.

Christians Enduring in Pakistan


Yesterday, I received a copy of a letter from our brother Rob Starck that he received from a friend from Pakistan. As you can read, believers in Pakistan face problems of which we can only imagine. Not only do they need our prayers, I invite y'all to share any ideas you might have on how we might help our brothers and sisters in southern Asia.
Prayerful greetings from Lahore, Pakistan.
Thank you very much indeed for your love and concern for Pakistan. As you know that Pakistan is strong Islamic state and it is very hard to live and exercise Christian faith.

It was really good to see you and your grandson at CLAN gathering. I enjoyed the inspiring teachings, thrilling worship and blessed fellowship of the believers like you.

Here, I would like to share the present situation of Pakistan.  The riots have been started many in many cities. Many people are injured including the police men in Islamabad yesterday. Friday the 21st September 2012, is announced prophet Mohammad Day in Muslim world.  A call for strike and protest has been given after the Friday prayer in all over the Pakistan against the blasphemous movie. The Christians are in all over the Pakistan very fearful because their lives, homes and properties would be attacked by the angry protesters and extremists during these protests.  We need to pray that the Lord may protect all of His people and bring peace in Pakistan, as one church in Karachi has already been attacked by the Muslim extremists. Following is the link to view:

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151063732278301.425221.236273278300&type=1


All Christians are scared and need Lots of prayers of our friends in the world. I am so sorry to write to you this news.

Bye for now and May God continually bless you and use you for the extension of His kingdom.

Yours in His service,
Waseem and Hazel
LEM, Pakistan
0092300-9479017

Friday, September 21, 2012

Cove’s Bulletin for Sunday, September 23, 2012


Below is a copy of Sunday’s bulletin. I’ll preach from James 3:13–4:3, 7-8a, and the title of the sermon is “Solving Life’s Problems.” I hope to see you Sunday.









Prayer Requests, to be shared during Sunday’s worship service


On Sunday, September 16, Cove Presbyterian Church will lift the following needs to God.

Adults
Alden & Delores Edwards
Alicia Parr
Andrea Vincent
Andy DiRemigio
Bill Moulds
Bob Saffle
Bobby Leonard
Carol Levesque
Charles Saffle
Chrissy Zatta
Christy Cybulski
Connie Francis
Diane Szymanek
Dick Bonyak
Dinny Walford
Domenick Notarantanio
Doug Friends
Emery Edwards
Ethel Grubner
Jamie Edwards
Jan Moncrief
Jeff Grant
Jesse Lescallette
Jim Hanna
Joan Gallagher
Joanne Westbrook
John Brothers
John Ross
Joshua Crow
Judy Mason
Kelly Stephens
Lindsey Ward
Marjie Dinges
Martha Meadows
Mary Ola Taflan
Maurene Roth
Michelle Hano
Mr. & Mrs. Mario Whitehead & Joyce
Nick Palavis
Paul Maine
Paul Moore
Peggy Murphy
Penny Mourat
Rhonda Bruich
Rich Jeffers
Richard Redfern
Rick Swain
Rose Sanders
Ruth Coates
Susan Ponville
Todd Majoris
Turner Family
Virginia & Paul Welch
Virginia Marston

Children
Aksel Ace
Audri King
Brandon Wares
Brody McUmor
Danielle Phillips
Emily Icard
Hunter Stafford
Jeffrey Konovich
Jonah Becker
Jonathan Marte
Justus Loughry
Kade Haines
Kya Schwertfeger
Kylee Leathers
Lily Ghrist
McKenna Popish
Michael Liptak
Shelby Kamarec
Zoe Purcell

Military
Chris Cameron
Jason Kerr
Jonathan Criss
Michael Criss
Stephen Mader

In the Hospital
Ronnie Taflan – Weirton Medical Center, rm. 880

Bereaved Families
Family of Bill Billick
Family of Alice Harr

Church Families
Linda Krynicki
Shirley Kurenski
Lori & Allen Lancaster, Cameron & Conor

Local Church
Mt. Olive Baptist Church

Special Friend
Bob Morgan – Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton, WV  26062-3652

Presbyterian Churches
United Presbyterian Church, Hopedale, Ohio – Vacant Pulpit
Jewett Presbyterian Church, Jewett, Ohio – Vacant Pulpit

Also Remember in Your Prayers
Alice Orr – Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton WV  26062
Bob Morgan – Weirton Geriatric Center, 2526 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton, WV  26062
Harry Hutch – Villa Vista, Room 507, 1800 Sinclair Ave., Steubenville, OH  43953
Jim Hanna – Weirton Geriatric Center
Marge Black – Weirton Geriatric Center, Room 223, 2528 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton, WV 26062
Mike Valiga – Weirton Geriatric Center, 2530 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton, WV  26062
Thelma Longacre – Chambrel at Montrose, Unit 210, 100 Brookmont Rd., Akron, OH  44333-3091

What’s Happening at Cove Presbyterian Church?

Below are the announcements as they appear in Sunday's bulletin.


DON’T FORGET SUNDAY SCHOOL  . . .
we meet every Sunday morning at 9:45 a.m.  Think about trying out one of our classes. We have a variety of classes to choose from to fit your needs.

THREE BOARD MEETING . . .
today, September 23 at 12:30 p.m. in Fellowship Hall. All board members are encouraged to attend.

BOOKMARKS . . .
Cove’s Reading Group will meet on Monday, September 24 at 6:30 p.m. in the church parlor.

CHANCEL CHOIR WILL PRACTICE . . .
on Wednesday, September 26 at 6:45 p.m. in the sanctuary. New member are welcome to join!!

THE BROWN BAG BIBLE STUDY . . .
will meet Thursday, September 27 at 12:30 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. We’ll look at 2 Corinthians 2:14–3:18.

DEACONS MONTHLY MEETING . . .
Monday, October 1 at 7:00 p.m. in the board room.

WON’T YOU JOIN US ?? . . .
for an evening of music and inspiration on Tuesday, October 2 as we celebrate the 90th Anniversary of the Myrtle McHendry Class. We will begin with a sit down dinner at 5:00 p.m. Followed by an evening of music and inspiration by Marvin Whiteman. Mr Whiteman will share his testimony of his sightless life through singing and  playing piano. He will also share many old memorable tunes. Reservation are required for dinner, the cost is $ 14.00 per person and must be made by Tuesday, September 25th. All men and women of the congregation are welcome to join our celebration! The Myrtle McHendry Class has held classes every Sunday morning throughout all those years and holds a social meeting eight times a year.  For reservations call: Bonnie Nichols at 304-723-5134 or Betty Virtue at 304-748-8196.  Please join us as for this milestone celebration!

WORLD COMMUNION SUNDAY . .
will be observed on Sunday, October  7, 2012 during the morning worship.

TRUSTEES MONTHLY MEETING . . .
Monday, October 8 at 6:30 p.m. in the board room.

BOARD OF SESSION . . .
will meet on Tuesday, October 9 at 6:30 p.m. for their monthly meeting in the board room.

PAPER PRODUCT NEEDED . . .
Deacon’s Challenge -  to all groups within Cove Church,
WE NEED YOUR HELP!!
The Food Pantry is in desperate need of paper products for our Thanksgiving and Christmas Baskets. We need unopened single rolls of paper towels, toilet tissue- 4 roll packages, liquid or bar soap, shampoo or conditioner.  We’re get creative, each group wishing to participate is to contact Kayla Violet with their group name by Sunday, October 28th. Then on Challenge Sunday, November 4th each group will have a different display in the narthex. The congregation will then be asked to vote for the most unique display and the winning group will receive a pumpkin pie as a thank you from the deacons. If you have any questions or need more information contact Kayla Violet at 304-374-6805.

OUR SYMPATHY . . .
is extended to the family of William G. Billick Sr., husband of Bonnie Billick and brother-in-law of Joyce & Manuel Fraga who died on Saturday, September 15, 2012.

$218.13 . . .
Is the amount of money that was received from the Kroger Community Rewards Program for the period of May-July 2012 with only 18 card members participating. We thank everyone who participates in the program, but ask that if you are not registered to donate to Cove Church please do so. If you wish, the church  office can  set-up your account for you. It costs you nothing but raises money for the church.

EXTERIOR DOORS . . .
at times do not close properly or completely, we are asking everyone to please take a moment to check to be certain the doors are completely closed behind you. This suggestion is for everyone’s safety and also the security of our building.

BULLETIN DEADLINE . . .
if you wish to have an article published in the weekly bulletin, please have the article into the church office by Wednesday at noon. Thank you for your cooperation.

DO YOU HAVE A NEW ADDRESS,. . .
new phone number or new e-mail ? Please contact the church office so we can update our records. We like to keep everyone informed of our events.  If you don’t receive mailings from us,  we may not have your current/correct information.

REMINDER, PLEASE COVER  . . .
the top of the church’s tables before they are used for any activity. They will stain and are hard to clean, this can be avoided with a little cooperation.

GREETERS NEEDED . . .
if you would like to serve as a greeter before a Sunday morning worship service, please contact Bonnie Nichols at 304-723-5134.

WE ARE BLOGGING!
We now have six blogs that you can check out for information and on which you can leave comments. They’re listed below:
The Cove Community (www.thecovecommunity.blogspot.com) - This is for the whole church. I’ll post sermons and announcements. I also invite y’all to send in material that you’d like to share with other members of the congregation. And please feel free to comment on anything you might read.
Cove Kids (www.covekids.blogspot.com) - This is tailored for the preteen young people in our church. Again I’ll post announcements. You’re also invited to send in any writings, photographs and art work you’d like to post. And they don’t have to all deal with the church. We also post artwork from Jesus Time.
Glue (www.cove-glue.blogspot.com) - Our teens are running their own blog site; therefore, I have no idea what will be posted.
Bible Talk (www.cove-bibletalk.blogspot.com) - We’ve established this blog to give pastors and lay people the chance to discuss Scripture. The weekly passages are from the Common Lectionary, and we’re posting the pastor’s translation of the  Greek text. We want you to read any or all of the passages and to leave any comment or ask any question that you feel is appropriate. Please include any research you’ve done. As we share our ideas and insights, we hope that we’ll all come to a better and deeper understanding of the Bible. Each passage is linked to a website that offers some informative information.
Let’s Talk About It (www.cove-talk.blogspot.com) - Through this site, we hope to encourage a conversation on a variety of topics. Since this blog is sponsored by a church, we expect most of the issues to involve the Christian faith. Still we don’t want to limit ourselves or you. If you have a topic that you’d like us to discuss, include it as a comment to a previous issue. Please phrase it as a question and offer a summary of at least two positions. We’ll add a new item to discuss every three weeks. We hope this challenges you to apply your faith to issues that are important to you.
The Bible in a Year (www.cove-bibleinayear.blogspot.com) - Each day, we’ll post passages so that you can read the Bible in one year.

CHRISTMAS IN NOVEMBER . . .
is being sponsored by the Myrtle McHendry Class on Friday, November 16th and Saturday, November 17. The ladies are accepting holiday decorations and new or gently used items that can be used or given as gifts. The items can be dropped off at the church at anytime, just mark what they are for and we will pass them along. Cemetery pillows will also be for sale.

YOU’RE INVITED TO JOIN US . . .
on a 10-Day Journey Through the Holy Land sponsored by Grace Presbyterian Church, Martins Ferry. Set for March 2 — 12, 2013, this tour will make the Bible come alive in a safe and unforgettable way. Your 10-day fully escorted tour covers airfare from Pittsburgh to Tel Aviv, all airport transfers and land travel as well as entrance fees, full breakfast every day, 6 three-course dinners and all lodging in either Superior First Class or First Class hotels. This is a tremendous opportunity for all those who want to walk in the steps of Jesus Christ. For additional information, call Sherry (740) 633-3933 or Rev. Bill at Grace Church (740) 633-2699.

IT IS OFTEN DIFFICULT TO HEAR PRAYER REQUESTS . . .
on Sunday mornings. If you would like to have someone added to the prayer chain please drop a short note into the collection plate with their name and any other information you would like to share.  You may also call the church office or e-mail the church with the information.

IF YOU LEAVE AN ITEM AT  CHURCH . . .
for someone or for a specific function, please take a moment to write the information on the item.  If there is no information on the item we will assume it is for the church in general.

IN THE HOSPITAL? HOMEBOUND? RECENT ILLNESS?. . .
if you are unable to attend services and would like to arrange for a visit from Rev. Ed Rudiger please contact the church office. Also if you would like to receive copies of the Sunday Bulletin contact the church office.  

WE CAN ALWAYS DO A BETTER JOB MINISTERING . . .
to the needs within this congregation, community and world. Please feel free to offer any suggestions as comments.

LOOSE CHANGE OFFERING . . .
Session approved the Deacons collecting a “Loose Change Offering” that will be used to assist the Deacons with their utility assistance outreach program for Weirton residents or Cove Church members. We hope church members can help with the assistance program by donating some of their spare change. A container is placed in the Narthex each Sunday morning before church. The Deacons thank you for your continuing support of their projects.

VASES OF FLOWERS. . .
can be purchased for a service. The cost is  $16.00 a vase.  Silk flowers or live plants can be purchased for an additional cost. The  flower calendar is located on the far wall in the church narthex or you can telephone the church office to place your order. After the service, the flowers will be placed in a plastic vase for you to take with you.

IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR NEWSPAPER CLIPPINGS. . .
newsletters from old friends  or articles about or by members of Cove Church,  check out the  bulletin board located in the hallway by the church offices.  Past event pictures are also on display in that area.

WE’RE UPDATING OUR PRAYER AND DEVOTION LINE . . .
about four times a week. If you would like to call and hear a devotional, please call 304-748-7900.

ONGOING MISSION PROJECTS . . .
Campbell’s Labels are being collected by the Presbyterian Women for the Weirton Christian Center.  The labels including the bar code or just the bar code can be dropped off in the container located in the main  hallway downstairs.
Greeting Cards are being collected. Please drop off your Greeting Cards or just the front of the card in the box located in the main hallway downstairs. The cards are being sent to St. Jude’s  Ranch to be remade into cards to be sold in their gift shop.  Hallmark, Disney or American Greeting Cards can not be accepted as they are trade marked.
Can Tabs are being collected for the Ronald McDonald House in Morgantown, West Virginia. Deposit your tabs in the container locate in the main hallway downstairs.  FYI - recently 60 pounds of tabs were sent to the Ronald McDonald House.
We thank you for your participation and support of our mission endeavors.

Great Flood of 1912 Took Its Toll on Hollliday’s Cove


Photo provided by the Weirton Area Museum and Cultural Center
Editor's note: The following article appeared in the Sept. 1, 1992, edition of the Weirton Daily Times. It is being reprinted to mark the centennial of the Harmon Creek Flood of 1912. Mary Campbell Bowman, a flood survivor, died in 1995 at age 91. John Davis, a Weirton native, resides today in Wellsburg with his wife, Lynn. He is executive vice president and general counsel at West Liberty University.

In the late evening of Sept. 1, 1912, a torrential rainstorm struck the Holliday's Cove (today, part of Weirton) region causing Harmon Creek to overflow its banks and wreak death and destruction throughout the Cove and Colliers.

Shown is the scene at the Y-bridge, which branched toward New Cumberland and to Colliers, in 1912. The Ohio River and Steubenville are around the bend on the left side of photo.

Mary Campbell Bowman, a Weirton resident born in 1904, survived the flood and recalled it vividly. Bowman, whose great, great, great-grandfather James Campbell came to this valley in 1772, shared her story in 1992 with local historian John Davis. The following account includes background material Davis unearthed in archival records of the disaster.

On Sunday, Sept. 1, 1912, Robert Elmer Campbell, his wife Bessie, and their children Kenneth and Mary attended evening worship services at Cove Presbyterian Church. The Campbells lived in a house at the present site of Millsop Community Center. Another son, Robert, was visiting his grandparents at the Campbell homestead near the top of Greenbrier Road.

The family passed the remainder of the evening sitting on their porch while the skies were ablaze with the reds and oranges of a brilliant summer sunset.

Just before nightfall, towering clouds began tumbling into the valley from the east. As darkness fell, bolts of lightning were seen up the Cove in the direction of Colliers.

Around midnight, the clouds opened, and a violent, driving rainstorm began. The force of the rainfall was such that it literally beat people to the ground. In Burgettstown, Pa., basements were quickly flooded. At Colliers, Harmon Creek flood waters reached to the second story of some homes, and 15 houses were swept away by the current.

Lightning flashes revealed the devastation. As residents scrambled to higher ground, they caught glimpses of their homes and belongings swirling downstream. In no time at all, the creek ran 30 feet deep. By 1:30 a.m., Harmon Creek overflowed its banks and crested at 40 feet.

In Holliday's Cove, the raging flood waters swept into the residences of William Fleming, Henry Campbell and Harry Bilderback. (Readers may recall that, until January 1992, a white, saltbox-style house stood near the Cove Road/Weir Avenue intersection. That was the Bilderback house.) William Moulds' meat market, William W. Smith's bake shop and Virgil Jackson's garage also were inundated by water.

At the William G. Knox house near the present site of the Salvation Army building, Mrs. Knox and her two children were trapped. They stood at an upstairs window and called for help. Charles Ferguson, a local plasterer, rescued them. He secured a rope to an embankment, waded and swam to the Knox house with the other end of the rope, and tied it to a gas pipe near the window.

Just moments after the family and Ferguson pulled themselves along the rope to safety, the house collapsed and was carried away in a rush of water.

In the lower Cove, most folks were still fast asleep. Harry Smith hurried across Main Street to awaken the Campbells. Outside a shuttered bedroom window, Mr. Smith picked up a tub and began pounding on it furiously. The din alarmed Mr. and Mrs. Campbell, and the family escaped - drenched, but safe - to the Smith home. There, little Mary, her brother Kenneth, and their parents spent a sleepless night in the company of other worried neighbors.

The following morning, area residents surveyed the damage around them. Sixteen lives had been lost, including 10 in Colliers. Cove resident Mrs. Clyde Warwick and her 2-year-old daughter were drowned. Their bodies were recovered from the Ohio River near New Martinsville on Wednesday afternoon.
When the cloudburst struck, an unidentified Colliers citizen telephoned Holliday's Cove to warn residents there of the approaching flood. Otherwise, the death toll in the Cove would have been greater.

Mary and Kenneth Campbell hiked out Cove Road with their father in the morning after the storm. Everywhere they saw houses crushed into splinters. They saw a pig swimming in the swollen creek.
At the home of Ida and C.T. Hoover, Mary's aunt and uncle, they found Aunt Ida dressed in her finest ensemble and toting a silk umbrella. Flood waters had overwhelmed the Hoover house and had crept up the stairway to within three steps of the second floor landing. Nevertheless, Aunt Ida had confronted the tragedy with her dignity intact. Mary's brother Robert returned from the Campbell homestead later that day. Naturally, the 10-year-old was very disappointed to have missed all the commotion.

This was the region's worst natural disaster since the May 31, 1889, Johnstown flood. Fourteen miles of Pan Handle Railroad track were washed away, and three railroad bridges were swept from their foundations. Concrete and stone bridge abutments likewise were displaced by the wall of water.

Throughout the region, rail service was disrupted. In Steubenville alone, 200 travelers (including members of several big league baseball teams) were stranded. Passenger rail service would not be restored until Thursday afternoon.

The new Phillips Steel and Tin Plate Company (later, Weirton Steel Company) tin mill was shut down because of water in the fly wheel pits. At Woodland (today, Aliquippa), Pa., lightning struck the Jones & Laughlin Steel power plant leaving the entire mill without lights. A man there was drowned.

In the days and weeks following the flood, debris and personal belongings choked the creek and nearby river. At Warwood, a piano and a pig were found bobbing in the river. A wooden trunk was recovered also and pried open. Inside it was $1,000, later claimed by immigrants who presented a key to the lock.

Local gas service was turned off. For a while, women prepared meals over open fires in backyards. Oil lamps were again in vogue.

The Weirton Area Museum and Cultural Center (www.weirtonmuseum. com) will present a program at 6 p.m. on Sept. 18 about the Flood of 1912 and other aspects of the history of Holliday's Cove. The museum is located at 3149 Main St., Weirton.



By MARY CAMPBELL BOWMAN And JOHN L. DAVIS - For The Intelligencer , The Intelligencer / Wheeling News-Register

International Peace Day

Some guns
Among the symbols and messages of peace at the United Nations are the
escopetarra invented by Colombian musician and peace activist Cesar Lopez.
Imagine a day when no bullets fly, no bombs explode. Imagine a day when people around the world join hands and work for peace. Impossible? But consider that on the International Day of Peace and every day: communities pray for peace; people work to end the exploitation of children as soldiers; Presbyterians in Philadelphia, Baltimore, and other cities join efforts to end gun violence; RECONCILE builds bridges across tribal violence in South Sudan; the Iglesia Presbiteriana de Colombia stands with sisters and brothers who have been displaced by violence; Palestinians and Israelis practice nonviolence; people advocate for a world free of nuclear weapons; people give to campaigns to rid the world of land mines; and neighbors offer and receive forgiveness.

In a world filled with violence, wars, and rumors of wars, the United Nations General Assembly acted in 1981 to declare September 21 the International Day of Peace. On this day, the peoples and nations of the world are called to observe a ceasefire, practice nonviolence, and reflect on the benefits of peacefully resolving disputes. It is a day that holds out a promise that is rooted in the vision of swords beaten into plowshares, a promise that guides and inspires individuals and communities around the world.

Give thanks for those people and groups who live in hope and wait for the Lord (Ps. 130:5-6) by working for peace this day and every day. By God's grace, may we join them.
 

Thursday, September 20, 2012

Sunday's Minute for Mission - Native American Day


An Illustration of Native American women sitting together in a circle
He was small in stature, shy, just like any other five-year-old upon entering a new environment. He would find safety and security behind his mother's skirts, even though everyone in the church was glad that his parents were coming and bringing him. It took several Sundays before he would join me in the Moment With the Children time during morning worship before going off to Sunday school, but once he felt safe and secure there was nothing shy about him.

We watched Brandon grow over the years and heard his stories of faith and his understandings. He kept the pastor on her toes with his inquisitiveness. Faithful in his attendance and faithful in his participation in Sunday school and church activities, he became our resident theologian at Central Presbyterian Church. He knew who he was through his tribal traditions, and he knew whose he was, a child of God.

At age nine he expressed that he was ready to be baptized. As his family talked together about it, Brandon made it very clear that he wanted to be baptized ``like Jesus.'' He wasn't talking theologically: he was literally wanting to come out of the water like Jesus, just like in the picture he remembered from Sunday school!

Baptism by immersion was the order of the day - a first for this urban Native congregation located in the middle of Phoenix. Where would we find water? In an inflatable pool we set up outside in the courtyard. On Saturday afternoon,  Brandon joked about piranhas or sharks being in the clear pool waters. But on Pentecost Sunday, climbing into that pool of water with me was a young boy ready to receive the Spirit. With each coming up out of the waters you could feel the Spirit’s presence all around and within us and in him.

Brandon is a fruit of the Spirit of ministry at Central that will soon celebrate 100 years of Native ministry in the same location.

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - The Leaf Pile


Philippians 2:1-11

If then there is any encouragement in Christ, any consolation from love, any sharing in the Spirit, any compassion and sympathy, make my joy complete: be of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind. Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility regard others as better than yourselves. Let each of you look not to your own interests, but to the interests of others. Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not regard equality with God as something to be exploited, but emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, being born in human likeness. And being found in human form, he humbled himself and became obedient to the point of death – even death on a cross. Therefore God also highly exalted him and gave him the name that is above every name, so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bend, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.



A Devotion by Karen Asire (South Carolina, USA)

When I glanced out the window, I noticed our neighbor’s worker dumping a bag filled with leaves in front of our curb. As he drove the mower back across the street to continue his work, I envisioned the problem those leaves could create. Our neighborhood is filled with trees. In the fall, the streets quickly fill with piles of raked leaves. While the city routinely collects the leaves, in the fall they can collect only once a month instead of weekly. There simply would not be room on our curb for both our leaves and the neighbor’s.

I decided to talk to the man and explain the problem. He answered, “It’s a city street, and we can put them wherever we want.” Though this may seem a small matter, I wondered at his lack of courtesy and consideration.

Paul told the believers in Corinth to seek the welfare of others (1 Cor. 10:24) saying, “‘All things are lawful,’ but not all things build up” (1 Cor. 10:23).

The worker’s words and attitude caused me to think about how we treat one another in daily situations. Do we treat others with kindness? Do we try to lift their burdens? Do we honor God by the way we speak to them?

From The Upper Room.

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - Not Seeing, and Believing


John 9:1-7, 35-38

As he walked along, he saw a man blind from birth. His disciples asked him, “Rabbi, who sinned, this man or his parents, that he was born blind?” Jesus answered, “Neither this man nor his parents sinned; he was born blind so that God’s works might be revealed in him. We must work the works of him who sent me while it is day; night is coming when no one can work. As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.”

When he had said this, he spat on the ground and made mud with the saliva and spread the mud on the man’s eyes, saying to him, “Go, wash in the pool of Siloam” (which means Sent). Then he went and washed and came back able to see.

Jesus heard that they had driven him out, and when he found him, he said, “Do you believe in the Son of Man?” He answered, “And who is he, sir? Tell me, so that I may believe in him.” Jesus said to him, “You have seen him, and the one speaking with you is he.” He said, “Lord, I believe.” And he worshiped him.


A Devotion by Terry Lee Davis (Florida, USA)

I was told that I would lie on my back during the cataract surgery and look into the bright light from the microscope being used in the operation to remove the cataract from my eye. As I lay waiting for the surgery to begin, someone said, “Doctor Smith is in the room.” A few seconds later, my surgery began.

It occurred to me later that I had not seen the man who restored my sight. But I believed that he was in the room and ready to help restore my vision.

Like me on the day of my surgery, the blind man whose story is told in the ninth chapter of John’s Gospel did not see Jesus before he was healed. Jesus sent him to the Pool of Siloam to wash the mud from his eyes. Later when Jesus saw the man and asked, “Do you believe in the Son of Man?” the man gave an honest answer: “Who is he, sir? Tell me so that I may believe in him.” Jesus said, “You have now seen him; in fact, he is the one speaking with you.” Then the man said, “Lord, I believe.”

In many ways that are meaningful to us personally, Christ comes to each of us individually. Even when we cannot see him clearly or do not know who he is, Christ reminds us that he is the Son of God, and that he has been with us all along.

From The Upper Room: September – October.

Sunday, September 16, 2012

Sunday's Sermon - Sticks and Stones

James 3:1-12

1Not many should become teachers, my brothers, because you know that you might receive a greater judgement. 2For in many ways we all stumble. If a person in word, doesn’t stumble, then this man is perfect, able to bridle also the whole body. 3But if we put bits into the mouths of horses in order that they obey us, then also their bodies, we guide. 4See also the boats, which are so big and by strong wind are driven, are guided by a small rudder where the impulse of the pilot wills, 5thus also the tongue, a small member, also boasts of great things. See how so small a fire can set alight so great a forest. 6And the tongue is a fire; the wicked world, the tongue is appointed among our members, the stain of the whole body and that which set fire the wheel of birth and that which set fire by Gehenna. 7For all kinds of animals and birds, reptiles and marine life, are subdued and have been subdued by human kind; 8but the tongue no one human is able to subdue, a restless evil, full of deadly poison. 9With it, we bless the lord and father, and with it, we curse humans who were made in the likeness of God; 10out of the same mouth come blessings and curses. This ought not, my brothers, be so. 11The spring of water, out of the same crevice, doesn’t gush with [water that’s] sweet and bitter, does it? 12A fig tree isn’t able to produce olives or a vine produce figs, are they? Nor can salty water produce sweet water.



 Sticks and Stones

The other day I found myself saying something to Maggie that I remember my mother saying to me all the time. Now I can’t remember the particulars, but I think Maggie thought that somebody had said something, let’s just say, unkind about her, and of course she was upset. And after talking to her for a little while and after, you know, trying to get her to reason through the situation by evaluating the reliability of the one who reported the message, the validity of the message itself and the credibility of the original speaker, for some reason, Maggie wasn’t feeling any better, even after I defined the words "reliability," "validity" and "credibility." She just wasn’t getting it and I was getting frustrated. I’ll tell you, it was like talking to a ten-year-old. Anyway, let’s just say she was still upset. And so I decided to do what any good father would do, there was just one problem: I didn’t know where her mother was; therefore, I knew I had to face this alone. But, I’ll tell you, it was amazing. At times of stress, it’s really neat how words will just come to you. Maybe they drift down on angel wings or arise from the morass of the inner mind, I just don’t know. Still, I knew exactly what to say. I looked at my daughter, and said something that, when I was a kid, my mom said at least once a week to my brother, my sister and me. I looked into those pained and trusting eyes and said, "Sticks and stones can break my bones, but words will never hurt me." And before she could ask any questions, I realized Debbie had her cell phone and hit speed dial.

Because, even though I’d said it, I really didn’t want to answer any questions, and I’ll tell you why. Deep down, I really don’t think it’s true. Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m 100% with that part about sticks, stones and bones. But then that stuff about words not hurting, well, to tell you the truth, personally, I think that’s a crock. As a matter of fact, speaking for myself, I believe I’ve been hurt more often and more severely by words than by sticks and/or stones. And if I’m honest with myself, although I’ve never hit anyone with a stick and I’ve thrown very few stones with malicious intent, I can’t say the same about using words to hurt others. You see, I’ve got to admit that, from time to time, I’ve used some verbal sticks and stones, and I’m talking about words that I either knew or suspected would cause a some pain to another. Now, if I’m honest, this is something I have to admit, something I have to confess. But what about y’all? Do any of y’all ever do this same kind of stuff? I mean, have you ever passed on some information that you never really confirmed as being true, but you shared it anyway like you were sure it was a fact? It’s called gossip. Have any of y’all ever done that? I’m a shamed to admit that I have. Or how about sharing something that’s not all that exciting, but then putting your own little spin on it to make it more interesting? You know, gilding the lilly a bit. Have y’all ever done that? I’m sad to say that I have. Or have any of y’all ever gotten so irritated or maybe out-and-out angry that you said something to or about a person that you wish you hadn’t said? Man, I sure have. It’s embarrassing and I know admitting this may come back to bite me in the future, but I’ve done all three more than I wish I had. And you know, I’ve got a gut feeling so have you. Am I right? And I’ll tell you, this problem is only going to get worse as what we say can literally become global the minute we hit the send button. With more and more people texting and posting, I’ve got to believe that our problem with words is here to stay.

And you know, for that reason, I think this passage from James was almost written for us, because right here, he was writing about the verbal sticks even Christians use to beat on one another and the spoken stones that they may lob at those they think deserve it. You see, right here in these verses, I think James really explains to us the problem with words but not only that, he also tells us what we can do, as believers, to bring our speech in line with our faith. I mean, although he didn’t come right out and say it this way, I think James recognized that, at it’s core, the problem with words is this: they’re easy to give out but nearly impossible to take back. Let me tell you what I mean.

Let’s face it, whether your talking about using our tongues or our thumbs, it’s pretty easy to get our thoughts, our feelings, our frustrations, our desires, our jealousies, our envy out to the world around us. I mean, as James reminds us, when compared to the rest of the body, the tongue is pretty small and words are incredibly easy to say. In fact, it’s so easy for us to speak that we can really say almost anything we want, whether we believe it or not. Of course, that’s not what you find in other aspects of life. And I’ll tell you, I think James understood this and that explains why he wrote, "With [our tongues], we bless the lord and father, and with it, we curse humans who were made in the likeness of God; out of the same mouth come blessings and curses. This ought not, my brothers, be so. The spring of water, out of the same crevice, doesn’t gush with [water that’s] sweet and bitter, does it? A fig tree isn’t able to produce olives or a vine produce figs, are they? Nor can salty water produce sweet water." But we can do it with our tongues, can’t we? Like they say, talk is cheap. I’m telling you, words are easy to give out.

But have you ever tried taking them back? Have you ever started a little gossip or stirred up a little controversy because you were mad or hurt, and then, after you calm down, want to take it back? Only a politician can say something stupid and later, with a straight face, deny that he said it. And have you ever sent a letter or an e-mail or a maybe a text that you know is going to cause pain and when the consequences end up being greater than you thought, found that you’d lost a whole more than you gained, but you couldn’t do anything about it? I think we’ve all read stories about kids who’ve been verbally bullied or gossiped about to the point that they take they’re own lives. Maybe James was right on the mark when he wrote, "...the tongue is a fire; the wicked world, the stain of the whole body and that which set fire the wheel of birth and that which set fire by Gehenna, ...a restless evil, full of deadly poison." James was right. Evil, hateful, cruel words are easy to say, but once they’re out, they can never be taken back.

And maybe for that reason, we should really take seriously what we say, both before we speak and after we stumble. For example, before we speak, before we post, my gosh, before we hit the send button, maybe we should pause. What a radical thought; to pause before speaking? Not only don’t we pause, we’re usually thinking about what we’re going to say before the other guy is finished talking. Man, we want to get it out as soon as we can, right; especially when we’re mad. Kind of shoot first, ask questions later. Or for the more spiritual minded, shoot them all, and let God sort it out. Pausing before speaking is almost counter-cultural for Americans. But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t take a breath and wait before we open fire. Because that little pause may give us a chance to do two things we wouldn’t do otherwise.

I mean, first, it gives us a chance to think. And if we do, who knows, maybe we’ll realize a few things. Maybe we’ll realize that it’s really not such a good idea to make that phone call or send that text. Or maybe we should check and see if he really said that about her or if she really did that to him. Maybe that nasty letter or e-mail that we wrote when we were really mad, maybe it’ll cause more destruction than necessary. As a matter of fact, thinking just might help us avoid confirming these words of Abraham Lincoln: "Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt." During the pause we can think; that’s one.

And second, we might also want to pray. You know, a lot of folks get all excited about WWJD, but WWJS, What Would Jesus Say, is also important. To my knowledge, Jesus never spread a single bit of gossip. He didn’t say anything false to enhance his own position. And he sure didn’t curse and cuss and swear because we was mad. Maybe before we open our pie-holes and let loose, we might want to pause and ask God to give us a Christ-like state of mind. You see, this is something we can do before we speak. And if we do, I think we’ll say a lot less we’ll want to take back.

But let’s face it, no matter how hard we try, sometimes a little water is going to seep out of the crack. Like James wrote, "For all kinds of animals and birds, reptile and marine life, are subdued and have been subdued by human kind; but the tongue no one human is able to subdue..." Unfortunately, we’re going to slip; we’re going to stumble. And when we do, I think there are three things we might want to consider doing. First, we might want to accept responsibility for what we said. I mean, even though we can offer all kinds of excuses and present all kinds of evidence that will show that we’ve been misquoted or misunderstood, more often than not the excuses don’t really justify our words and the real problem is that we were quoted and understood pretty well. We need to accept responsibility for what we say. And then second, after accepting responsibility, an apology might be nice. Let’s face it, saying "I’m sorry" to a person we’ve hurt might be a lot better than engaging them in some kind of debate or forcing them to listen to us try to justify ourselves. And finally, we might want to seek forgiveness. I mean, if I know that I’ve done some kind of physical damage to a person, I’m going to do what I can to make things right. That’s just the way things are done. Well, why wouldn’t we do the same thing when our words have done damage? We need to seek forgiveness. And if that forgiveness takes a while, I think we need to be willing to wait. Good night, we were the ones swinging the stick and throwing the stones. You see, this is what we can do after we’ve stumbled over our words.

Remember the conversation I had with Maggie. Although I told her about sticks, stones and words, deep down, I don’t believe that what I said was true. I think we all know that words can cause a lot of damage. And I think we also know that what makes them so dangerous is that they’re easy to give out, but nearly impossible to take back. And for that reason, before we feel the urge to slam with words, we might want to pause so that we can think and pray. And when we forget, and I’m talking about after we stumble, we might need to accept responsibility, apologize and seek forgiveness. And you know, if we’re able to pull this off, who knows, maybe we’ll move closer to making that stuff about sticks and stones true.