Monday, October 31, 2016

Sunday's Sermon – Uncomfortable Gratitude

Below is a copy of the sermon I preached on Sunday, October 30, in Two Ridges Presbyterian Church, Wintersvilles, Ohio and Cove Presbyterian Church, Weirton, West Virginia. You can find a podcast of this sermon on the Cove Podbean page. You might also want to visit the congregational website (covepresbyterian.org) for more church information.

If you find this sermon meaningful, please consider supporting this ministry by sending an offering to Cove Presbyterian Church, 3404 Main Street, Weirton, West Virginia or through PayPal.



Acts 4:32-37

And the whole multitude who believed were of one heart and one soul, and no one said of possessions that they owned them, but they had all things in common. And with great power, the apostles rendered the testimony of the resurrection of the Lord Jesus, and great grace was upon them all. For no one was in need among them. For anyone who owned property or houses would sell them, and they brought the proceeds of what was sold, and they laid it before the feet of the apostles, and it was distributed to each as any had a need.

And Joseph, to whom the apostles had given the name Barnabas, which is translated “Son of Encouragement”, a Levite, born in Cyprus; he sold a field that belonged to him, brought the money
and laid it before the feet of the apostles.

Uncomfortable Gratitude

As most of y’all know, over the last few weeks, we’ve been focused on how we might live in grace and gratitude. And this morning, we’re going to talk about the different ways our gratitude for God’s grace can be expressed. And since we’re coming to the end of October, I think I’ve kind of got Halloween on the brain. And yesterday, as I was listening to the Girl Scouts have their Halloween extravaganza in the Fellowship Hall, I thought about what we used to do this time of year when I was a kid. Now, y’all need to understand that my brother is six years younger than me, and so, when he was little, it was my job to take him around the neighborhood to trick-or-threat. And I’ll tell you, although I believe we were both grateful for all the candy we collected on that one night, the way we expressed our gratitude was radically different. Of course, this was a time when kids had every reason to be grateful. I mean, we lived before anybody thought to give out stuff as downright nasty and insane as dental floss or a toothbrush. Everything we got was sweet, outside of some apples and oranges that really didn’t count. Now that was Halloween in the late 60s.

And back then, I felt that I could best should how grateful I was for all the popcorn balls and Sugar Daddies and those caramels wrapped in orange and black paper, the best way to show my gratitude was to make them last as long as I could. And that’s what I did. Like any good Presbyterian, I didn’t what to indulge myself and to enjoy the candy too much. (I mean, too much joy could be dangerous
and is certainly sinful, right?) And so I’d space it out, with maybe a couple of those little “Mary Janes” or maybe a mini-Snickers each night. And if I played my cards right, I could make that candy last not only through Christmas, but maybe all the way to Easter. Now that’s how I expressed my gratitude.

But my brother, he had an entirely different approach. He showed his appreciation by shoving as much sugar into his system as he could. As a matter of fact, during the days right after Halloween, I don’t think he slept at all, because he was tripping on Pixie Sticks and Smarties. And his eyes were literally glazed over like a Krispy Cream donut. And I remember, his little chocolate stained fingers would shake until he got his next M&M fix. You see, even though we were brothers, how we expressed our gratitude was very different.

Of course, not all expressions are created equal, especially when we bring God into the equation. As a matter of fact, there are some expressions of appreciation that, when we hear about them, man, they just plain make us kind of uncomfortable, but not because they’re wild or crazy and anything like that. No, they’re just too good and noble and demanding. And you know, I think we got an example of what I’m talking about in the passage we just read from Acts. Now I don’t know about y’all, but this little description makes me really uncomfortable. I mean, outside of the part about how everybody brought all their stuff and laid it at the apostle’s feet, something I actually think that would work, and we should try next week, all this business about there being no private property and everybody having everything in common, and giving to others based on their needs, man, that’s sounds kind of communist to me. And then that example of Barnabas, selling a field and giving away the money, because he was so grateful for what God had already done, well, that makes me really uncomfortable. And I’ll tell you why; for me, the reason is clear. It’s because I’m not going to do it; that’s why it makes me uncomfortable. There’s just no way I’m going to sell everything I have and give the money away. But before you judge me, are you willing to do it? I mean, right now, are you going to sell everything you have, and bring the money to church and so that we give it all to people who are needy? Frankly, I don’t think so.Man, it’s hard enough to get stewardship cards back; I don’t see stocks and bonds flowing in. And just remember there’s truth in that old joke. A $100 bill, a $20 bill and a dollar bill were waiting to be burned, something they do to old currency, and they started taking. And the $100 bill said, “You know, I’ve had a good life. I’ve seen the best restaurants and the best stores and the best hotels.” And then the $20 bill said, “I’ll tell you, I’ve had a pretty good life too, because I’ve seen some pretty good restaurants and stores and hotels.” And then the dollar said, “Well, my life has been incredibly boring. I haven’t been anywhere. All I’ve seen is church, church, church.” Let’s face it, this is one uncomfortable passage.

And so it’s no surprise that we often do with it the same thing we do with most scripture that we don’t particularly like. I mean, we either sort of ignore it, and let’s face it, that’s easy to do, because there’s a lot of other, more comfortable stuff in here. We either do that or we interpret it until it says exactly what we want it to say. In fact, I heard a guy take this passage and said that we’re actually not suppose to apply it at all, you know, that it’s intended a negative example, because let’s get real, God wants his children to be capitalists, right? This illustrates a system that God knows doesn’t work; therefore, we should do with it what we want just so long as we don’t apply it. Now that’s what he said, but of course, he also said that when Jesus told the rich young ruler to sell what he had, give the money to the poor and follow him, we shouldn’t apply that either. I’ll tell you, to ignore it or interpret it, those are both possibilities. But I think there’s something else we can do with this passage. You see, instead of ignoring it or interpreting it to death, we can listen to what’s being said here. And you know, even though all this stuff about selling off and giving away is probably going to make most good, middle-class folks uncomfortable, we can actually claim the example offered in these words. And without saying we have to either do it all or nothing, we can use what happened in this community as a reminder of how we, ourselves might express our own gratitude to God. I mean, just think about what’s going on here.

First, I think this can remind us that we can express our gratitude by strengthening our unity, our unity as a congregation, our unity as Christians. In other words, we can recognize what God has done, you know, how he’s drawn us together into this community, into this body. And he’s given us all we need to do the work he’s called us to do. Remember, according to the passage, “the whole multitude who believed were of one heart and one soul, and no one said of possessions that they owned them, but they had all things in common.” Now that’s unity. But the only way that’s going to happen is for us to come together, in other words, for us to decide that we’re going to compliment one another and to work with one another, because there’s no way a team’s going to win if everybody wants to play quarterback. To be successful as a congregation, we need to work together; we need unity. And to get it, well, that’s going to require putting aside a little bit of ego, a little bit of “it’s either my way or the highway”, a little bit of “we either play by my rules or I’m going home”, you see, it’s going to require what Jesus called denying self, and then following him, following him with our brothers and sisters, I’m talking about following him with those whom the Spirit’s equipped and empowered to do things that I may not consider important, because I can’t do them. For good or for bad, unity only happens when we make it happen. And I’ll tell you why it’s important. When we strive for unity, when we choose to become the kind of body Christ called us to be, not only will we have a source of strength and support we may not have had in the past, we’ll be able to make a real difference in the world around us. I’m telling you, using the example in the passage, we can show our gratitude by strengthening our unity. But that’s not all.

Second, this example also reminds us that we can express our gratitude by maintaining our focus, and I’m talking about our focus on God. And for this early community, this focus was clear. “And with great power, the apostles rendered the testimony of the resurrection of the Lord Jesus, and great grace was upon them all.” You see, as a sign of our appreciation, we can decide to focus on what God has done for all of us through Jesus Christ. But beyond that, we can decide to share that good news with others. Of course, how we do it will be based on the gifts God’s given us. I mean, for some, this may involve standing up and preaching the word to a congregation in a sanctuary or teaching it to folks sitting around a table or sharing with the guy living next door. Now I know doing that kind of thing isn’t for everybody. But I’ll tell you, and I know I’ve said this before, I think we can all invite a friend or neighbor to come with us to worship. Now, that’s certainly part of focusing our attention on God. And to do it, well, it may mean spending some time reading the Bible and maybe attending a study so that we can understand what going on under the surface. And I’ll tell you why I think that’s important. The more we focus our attention on God and the more knowledgeable we become, the more we’ll appreciate his incredible love for us and the power of the sacrifice he made and the wonder of the grace he freely offers. I’m telling you, the more we know about the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit, the closer we’re going to feel with God. And as we live our lives out in the real world, that closeness, that connection, man, it’s going to be visible to others. You see, using the example offered in this passage, we can show our gratitude by maintaining our focus.

And finally, if nothing else, this story about the earliest church has got to remind us that we can express our gratitude and our appreciation by serving our neighbor. And isn’t that what was happening back then, when “...no one was in need among them. For when anyone who owned property or houses would sell them, and they brought the proceeds of what was sold, and they laid it before the feet of the apostles, and it was distributed to each as any had a need”? Now that’s taking care of the other guy. And you know, we can do this too. And even though I doubt that any of us will sell all they have just like I doubt that we’ll ever get to a point where no one has any needs, we can certainly move in that direction, maybe by holding a little less and giving a little more. I mean, maybe we can be a little less judgmental about those who are poor and a little more humble when we look at our possessions. You see, maybe we can all be a little less eager to see what we have as blessings that we should enjoy and a little more willing to see them as opportunities that we can use. And I think that’s something we can do as individuals and as a congregation. And when we do, not only will we become more satisfied with what God’s given, we’ll also be more anxious to share what we have. I’m telling you, with this passage as a guide, we can show our gratitude by serving our neighbor.

And this is something we can do, even though this passage may make us uncomfortable. And now that I think about it, the way both my brother and I expressed our gratitude for the Halloween treats, well, that made us uncomfortable too. I mean, that certainly happened to my brother, when he suffered all the digestive discomforts that come from an Almond Joy bender. But you know, it was uncomfortable for me too. You see, no matter how carefully I planned out my candy consumption, sometime in the first week of November, I’d find my little brother, passed out, surrounded by wrappers, and I’d know he’d found my stash. Expressions of gratitude can make us uncomfortable. But before we take this uncomfortable passage from Acts and either ignore it or explain it away, let’s pause and remember that like them we can express our gratitude to God by strengthening our unity and by maintaining our focus and by serving our neighbor. You see, this we can do. And if we do, well, this example from the early church may not make us uncomfortable at all.

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for October 31, 2016

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for October 31, 2016: Today our passages are  Lamentations 4:1–5:22; Hebrews 2:1-18; Psalm 103:1-22; and Proverbs 26:23 .  The readings are from  The...

Sunday, October 30, 2016

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for October 30, 2016

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for October 30, 2016: Today our passages are  Lamentations 2:20–3:66; Hebrews 1:1-14; Psalm 102:1-28; and Proverbs 26:21-22 .  The readings are from  ...

Saturday, October 29, 2016

A Thought from the Word - A brief thought based on 1 Peter 1:24-25

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - Ready, Not Worried

Below is a new devotion I just left on the Cove Presbyterian Church prayer line. You can find a recording of this devotion on the prayer line (1-304-748-7900) or on the Cove Presbyterian Church Podbean page. You might also want to visit the congregational website (covepresbyterian.org) for more church information.

If you find this devotion meaningful, please consider supporting this ministry by sending an offering to Cove Presbyterian Church, 3404 Main Street, Weirton, West Virginia or through PayPal. And no contribution is too small.


Luke 12:32-40

"Do not be afraid, little flock, for it is your Father's good pleasure to give you the kingdom. Sell your possessions, and give alms. Make purses for yourselves that do not wear out, an unfailing treasure in heaven, where no thief comes near and no moth destroys. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.

"Be dressed for action and have your lamps lit; be like those who are waiting for their master to return from the wedding banquet, so that they may open the door for him as soon as he comes and knocks. Blessed are those slaves whom the master finds alert when he comes; truly I tell you, he will fasten his belt and have them sit down to eat, and he will come and serve them. If he comes during the middle of the night, or near dawn, and finds them so, blessed are those slaves.

"But know this: if the owner of the house had known at what hour the thief was coming, he would not have let his house be broken into. You also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an unexpected hour."

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Ready, Not Worried

It seems as though a lot of folks are really worried now-a-days, and I’ll tell you, I think they have some very good reasons. For instance, even if you’ve been lucky enough to avoid downsizing, there’s no guarantee you’ll have a job on which you can raise a family. And it seems our children are exposed to far too much; therefore, they’re forced to make decisions before they’re able. And sometimes I swear it appears as through anger and resentment are motivating men and women to do things that would have been unthinkable ten years ago. And these are just a few examples. I think we all have other stuff that cause our worry meter to creep a little bit.

But there’s one thing about which we don’t need to worry, and that’s the love and grace of God shown through Jesus Christ and inspired within us by the Holy Spirit. You see, although it makes sense for us to be ready for the time we might meet him face-to-face, we don’t need to be concerned about whether he loves us. As a matter of fact, it really doesn’t matter whether our departure from this mortal toil comes when he returns to us or we leave to meet him, the truth is still the same: when it comes to entering our ultimate destinies, we should be ready, not worried.

Friday, October 28, 2016

Prayer Requests, to be shared during Sunday’s worship service

On Sunday, October 30, Cove Presbyterian Church will lift to God the following needs.

Adults
Chad Wilson
Darcy Keffer
Sharon Wheeler
Matthew Kirtley
Ronnie Buffington
Shirley Everhart Kirtley
Stacy Jo Vogel
Amy Slisik
Jim & Shelley Pearson
Marcia Cooper
Wayne Channing
Mike Churchman
Debbie Zuccaro
Marge Oslett
Michael Shade
Karen Lombardi
Carol Baker
Paul Merritt
Audrey Vincent
Betty Michael
Vicki Williams
Sandra Duckworth
Emery Edwards
David Johns
Peggy Stewart
Cindy Kuzel
Debi Edge
Kevin Kuzel
Bruce Mader
Patricia Cox
John Guglielmo
Gen Meyer
Olivia Shelton
Joanie Lawrence
Goldie Baly
Greta Billham
Jan Jackson
john Barnhardt
Kay Hyde
Linda Spencer
Phyllis Manley
Randal Kane
Richard Ballard
Rocco Zuccaro
Roxanne Berry
Sally Robinson
Suellen Lewis
Susie Hawkins

Children
Audri King
Elijah Parker
Jameson Criss
Jeffrey Konovich
Jonathan Marte
Lily Ghrist
Meadow Abbett
Michael Liptak
Mitch Almason

Military
Isaac Stephens
Jason Kerr
Jonathan Criss
Justin Schmalstieg
Lisa Burk
Michael Criss

Church Families
Marjorie Holingbaugh
Rachael Lynn Ianni
Judy Jackson

Local Church
Mt. Olive Baptist Church

Special Friend
Rosalie Coxen – 135 Clearview Ave., Weirton, WV  26062-4040

Upper Ohio Valley Presbytery Congregations 
Piney Fork Presbyterian Church, Piney Fork, Ohio – Vacant Pulpit
First Presbyterian Church, Powhatan Point, Ohio – Vacant Pulpit

Also Remember in Your Prayers
Alice & Kenny Orr – Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton, WV  26062
Carl Hamill – Serra Manor, Apt. 11, 205 Serra Manor, Weirton, WV  26062
Dolores Edwards – Wyngate, 100 Wyngate Dr., Weirton, WV  26062
Harry Hutch – Villa Vista, Room 406, 1800 Sinclair Ave., Steubenville, OH  43953
June Virtue – Grace Cottage, 195 Eden Dr., Weirton, WV  26062-3664
Theresa Skiles – Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton, WV  26062
Ruth Ann Oestering – Woodland Hills, 608 North 10th St., Weirton, WV  26062

What's Happening at Cove Presbyterian Church?

Below are the announcements as they appear in the Sunday bulletin.

THE SEASON AFTER PENTECOST
“We have seen…that the half of the year following Pentecost is different in character from the seasons of Advent, Christmas, Epiphany and Lent, Holy Week, Easter.  Whether it is called ‘ordinary time,’ or ‘Season After Pentecost,’ or ‘Kingdomtide,’ each Sunday stands on its own as the Lord’s Day and should be considered in the light of The Scriptures to be read that day.  …The Season After Pentecost is just that; it is not the Pentecost Season…” (Handbook of the Christian Year, p. 241)  Green, the color of abiding life, of peace, nourishment, rest and constancy, is the traditional color for this time of year.

YOU MAY HAVE NOTICED THAT BEFORE THE SERVICE . . .
the Rev. Rudiger pours water into the baptismal font even though we might not have a baptism on that particular Sunday. Here’s the reason. Since baptism is one of the pillars of our identity as Christians, this is a reminder that we’re united as members of the Body of Christ. It represents a gift given to us by God, one that we can’t earn and don’t deserve. As we move forward as a congregation, it’s important to remember and to celebrate the sacrament that unites us. And since Jesus said that part of making disciples of all nation involves baptizing them, it’s also a reminder of the mission we’ve been given.

“JESUS TIME” IS SPECIAL TIME FOR . . .
all our children and young people. This Sunday School experience offers them the opportunity to learn the Bible story and apply that story to their lives. “Jesus Time” meets at 11:00 a.m. and runs until the end of the Worship Service. If you have children and teens, ask one of the greeters to direct you to the children’s location.

YOU’RE INVITED TO GATHER WITH YOUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS . . .
and share communion after the service.

OUR TUESDAY EVENING STUDY . . .
will meet on Tuesday, November 1, at 6:30 p.m. to continue a series entitled “On the Road Again: A Study of Luke/Acts.”  During this session, we’ll look at Luke 1:1 – 2:52.

THE BELL CHOIR . . .
will practice on Saturday, at 11:00 a.m.

CHOIR WILL REHEARSE . . .
Sundays, from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. They’ll rehearse in the choir room each Sunday from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.

THE MYRTLE MCHENDRY CLASS WILL MEET 
Tuesday November 1, at 12:30 for their monthly business and social hour.  The theme will be "Let Us Give Thanks". Shirley DeLuca will present the program and her Mission with the American and Northern Indians.  Suellen Lewis will lead the devotions.   Suellen Lewis and Esten Jezerski are hostess's.

PARIS PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH WILL BE HOSTING . . .
the Church Women United World Community Day Friday, November 4 at 11:00 a.m.  for Project: “After School Snacks for the Dunbar Recreation Center.”  If you will not be attending but wish to make a donation please drop it off with Heather and she will make sure it gets to the project managers.

COVE'S ANNUAL MEMORIAL SERVICE . . .
will be held on Sunday, November 6 during the morning worship. At that time we will remember all deceased members and friends of Cove who have died during the past year. Each individual will have a white rose placed in the sanctuary in their memory. The flower will be  your's to keep after the service. If you have someone you wish included please contact the church office.

WE INVITE EVERYBODY IN OUR COMMUNITY . . .
to come to our Project Christmas Smile Annual Spaghetti Dinner, Sunday, November 6 from noon till 1:30 p.m. in Fellowship Hall. Adults can dine for $5.00 and children under 10 for $3.00. All proceeds will go to our Christmas outreach to the children in our area. In addition to the posted menu, meatless sauce will be available upon request.

COVE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH . . .
in partnership with Striplight Theater and the Ohio Valley Cloak & Dagger Company presents Murder in the End Zone, Saturday, November 12, Dinner at 6:00 Show at 7:00, in Cove’s Fellowship Hall. Please call 304-748-5980 for more information and to purchase tickets in advance.

PLEASANT VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 
5360 National Road at the foot of Blaine Hill, Exit 220 off of I-70, invites you to join them Tuesday, November 1, 2016, for Blaine First Tuesday: 5:15 p.m. Gathering and Silent Meditation, 5:30 – 6:00 p.m. Vigil for the Nation. As part of a sequence of first Tuesday services, Pleasant Valley Presbyterian Church will host a time of silent prayer for the nation in the final week before the 2016 elections. Leave your politics at the door and join together in meditation on the word of God and in prayer for the nation, for those in need in our community, and for those recovering from natural disasters and political unrest around the globe.

LAUGHLIN MEMORIAL CHAPEL CHRISTMAS: 
Suggested items on the kids’ wish list can be found on our website under Spotlight. This year Chapel enrollment has greatly increased; any and all gifts and donations will be greatly appreciated. The Chapel would like to have items no later than Monday or Tuesday, November 21stor 22nd. They will be at the Chapel from 8:30 am to 6:00 pm. They are at 129½ 18th St., Wheeling. This will give them the last days in November to prepare for the kids’ party as they are closed in December. If you can’t get out to shop, monetary donations for Christmas gifts will be accepted as they have some special Chapel elves who will do the shopping. Mail your check, payable to Laughlin Memorial Chapel, to the Chapel at PO Box 6195, Wheeling, WV 26003. Memo line: Christmas. They would like to have this by Monday or Tuesday, November 21st or 22nd, (the Chapel will be closed November 23 through 27) and their elves can shop the last days in November. If you have any questions or concerns, please call the Chapel at 304-232-2630. Thank you for your generosity and support!

DO YOU LIKE TO WRITE STORIES? 
We have something which might interest you. It is “A Writing Fiesta for the Young and Young at Heart.” We are looking for stories which focus on Giving the Gift of Peace at Christmas. This is sponsored by the UOVP Peacemaking Subcommittee. The stories can be non-fiction or fiction. Word limit—500. Prizes will be given. All authors who submit stories give permission to the Peacemaking Committee to have their stories published on our new, soon to be launched, peacemaking website. We encourage persons of any age to submit your story by e-mail to storyteller1001@comcast.net. These can be stories which actually happened or made up stories. Please bear in the mind the focus—Giving the Gift of Peace at Christmas. Questions? Contact storyteller1001@comcast.net.

RULING ELDER ROCKY CAMPBELL . . .
will be available after the service to hear your suggestions and concerns.

WE APPRECIATE ALL THOSE WHO ARE OFFERING . . .
their time and special gifts to the church. In particular, we thank the following:
We thank Ray Seifert for directing our choir, Sue Willson for directing the bells, and Peggy Baldt for running our sound system during the service.
We wish to Thank Rick Baldt for restoring our Tower Bells.  We also wish to thank the Memorial Committee for there generous offer to pay for the Amplifier we needed to accomplish this task. $359.95 was the amount needed.
We thank Roger and Patti Criss for buying a shredder and a tripod for the bulletin board. We also thank Don and Greta Billingham for buying a paper cutter for the Church.
Finally, we thank the city for cutting down that tree that was clogging the strainer in air conditioner.

OCTOBER IS UNICEF MONTH . . .
when churches and organizations collect for the United Nations Children's fund who provides humanitarian and developmental assistance to children and Mothers in developing countries. Our Church women collected at Shop N Save on Thursday and the Children of Cove Church will be collecting this morning. Your donations can buy
$  5 Can provide 13 doses of a measles vaccine.
$15 Can provide a child with clean, safe water for one year.
$50 Can provide 35 malnourished children with a lifesaving nutrition for one day.
$165 Can provide a bicycle to deliver medicine to children.
UNICEF is a project of Church Women United of Weirton.  We are grateful for your contributions.

THE MEDICARE ANNUAL ENROLLMENT PERIOD . . .
is quickly approaching: October 15 through December 7. This is an excellent time to review your Medicare supplemental coverage, especially your prescription drug coverage. Your Church Secretary is also a licensed insurance agent who specializes in Senior Insurance Products.  Contact Heather (304-374-0778) to set up a confidential coverage review.  All information is HIPPA protected.

IN THE NEXT FEW WEEK, 
we’ll have the opportunity to order some of the best pepperoni rolls in the Ohio Valley for the incredible price of $2.00/roll . Starting next week, we’ll be able to take your order, so think about how many you might want. And all proceeds will go to our youth.

COVE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH WILL AGAIN HAVE THE HONOR . . .
of hosting the Weir High Baccalaureate on Sunday, May 21, 2017.

A SPIRITUAL MESSAGE . . .
can be found by calling 304-748-7900 Cove’s Prayer Line. You can call at anytime to hear a message by Rev. Rudiger. The messages are changed every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.  You can also hear the devotion at covepresbyterian.podbean.com and iTunes (search Cove Presbyterian). You can also read the devotion at www.thecovecommunity.blogspot.com.

YOU CAN NOW MAKE DONATIONS THROUGH PAYPAL . . .
by go on the link you can find in our daily e-mails and on our website (covepresbyterian.org) and all our blog. We can also help you set up a PayPal account, if you don’t already have one.

WE ARE UPDATING OUR PRAYER CHAIN . . . 
regularly. If you wish to add someone, contact the church office.

IF YOU’RE IN THE KROGERS COMMUNITY REWARDS PROGRAM . . .
your enrollment is valid for 12 months from the registration date. You will need your Kroger rewards card number. To confirm that your registration is still active or to re-register you can contact Kroger customer service at this number: 1-866-221-4141. If you need to re-register all you'll need is your Kroger Card number and  our Cove Church number which is 80270. All that is required is that you go to Kroger.com; Community; Rewards; Enroll Now; type in Cove and hit search; click on Cove Presbyterian; click on Enroll Now. Please check your receipt the next time you shop, the bottom should read You requested Kroger to donate to Cove Presbyterian Church. If you need help with this process just call the church office, and Heather Campbell will be happy to assist you.

WHEN YOU REGISTER FOR AMAZON SMILE,
you get the same products and service we expect from Amazon except the Church gets .5% of every qualifying purchase. The Amazon Smile registration for first time users is https://smile.amazon.com/Ch/55-0462066. You only have to register once then go to www.smile.amazon.com to place orders.

LAURA LEWIS’ DAUGHTER NEEDS TO FIND SOMEONE . . .
who could look in on her mother and provide help with light housekeeping, getting her breakfast, possibly making a sandwich for her lunch, and making sure she takes her medications. If you’re interested or know someone who might be interested, please contact the church office.

WE NOW HAVE FIVE BLOGS . . . 
that you can check out for information and on which you can leave comments. They’re listed below:
The Cove Community - This is for the whole church. I’ll post sermons and announcements.
Cove Kids - This is tailored for the young people in our church. Again I’ll post announcements. You’re also invited to send in any writings, photographs and art work you’d like to post.
Bible Talk - We’ve established this blog to give pastors and lay people the chance to discuss Scripture. The weekly passages are from the Common Lectionary.
The Bible in a Year - Each day, we’ll post passages so that you can read the Bible in one year.
Growing in Grace - Although we’re saved by God’s grace, we can grow in our understanding of grace. At Cove Presbyterian Church, we offer a variety of different classes for children and adults, many of which are recorded and posted on our PodBean page (covepresbyterian).

IF YOU’RE ABLE AND WILLING TO PROVIDE TRANSPORTATION . . .
so that some of homebound members are able to attend our worship services, please tell the pastor or another member of session.

SERMONS, DEVOTIONS, LESSONS, AND ESSAYS ARE AVAILABLE ON . . .
the Cove PodBean page (covepresbyterian.podbean.com) and iTunes (search Cove Presbyterian).

IF YOU’RE ONLINE . . .
“like” us on Facebook (Cove Presbyterian Church,  https://www.facebook.com/Covepresbyterian) or join our Facebook group (The Cove Community, https://www.facebook.com/groups/115579235630/). You can also connect with Pastor Rudiger on Instagram (rev_ed).

IN THE HOSPITAL? HOMEBOUND? RECENT ILLNESS?
f you know of someone who is in the hospital please contact the church office, due to privacy laws the hospital is unable to contact us. If you are unable to attend services and would like to arrange for a visit from Rev. Ed Rudiger or to receive communion please contact the church office. Also, if you would like to receive the Sunday Bulletin contact the church office.

IF YOU DON’T PLAN TO TAKE YOUR BULLETIN HOME . . .
drop it in the purple container at the back door so that it can be recycled.

VASES OF FLOWERS . . .
can be purchased for a service. The cost is $16.00 a vase.  You may also purchase silk flowers or live plants, the choice is yours.  Telephone the church office to place your order. After the service, we’ll place the flowers in a vase for you to take.

ONGOING MISSION PROJECTS . . . 
Campbell’s Labels are being collected by the Presbyterian Women for the Weirton Christian Cent er.  The labels including the bar code or just the bar code can be dropped off in the container located in the hallway downstairs.
Greeting Cards are being collected by the Myrtle McHendry Class. Please drop off your used Greeting Cards or just the front of the card in the box located in the main hallway downstairs. No envelopes -please. The cards are being sent to St. Jude’s  Ranch to be remade into cards to be sold in their gift shop.  FYI . . Hallmark, Disney or American Greeting Cards can not be accepted as they are trade marked.
Can Tabs are being collected by the Presbyterian Women for the Ronald McDonald House in Morgantown, West Virginia. Deposit your tabs in the container located in the hallway downstairs.

Cove's Bulletin for Sunday, October 30, 2016

Below is a copy of our Sunday bulletin. We're continuing our series dealing with how we might live in grace and gratitude. And the title of the sermon is “Uncomfortable,” and we’ll consider how we can apply examples of gratitude to ourselves.











Friday's Essay - After Halloween

Below is an essay that I sent to those on the Cove Presbyterian Church e-mailing list. You can hear a podcast of this message by going to the Cove Presbyterian Podbean page. You might also want to visit the congregational website (covepresbyterian.org) for more church information.
If you find this essay helpful, please consider sending an offering directly to Cove Presbyterian Church, 3404 Main Street, Weirton, West Virginia or through PayPal.
Image result for trick or treatI think I’m entering a new Halloween phase in my life. Let me explain. When I was little, I went trick-or-treating all over my South Bayview neighborhood, because let’s face it, you can never collect too many “Mary Janes”, popcorn balls and those caramel candies wrapped in black and orange pager. As I remember, my all-time favorite custom was Superman, which included a little red mask for some strange reason. Anyway, I hit the streets for about five years, and then I stopped. And although I gave out candy for a few Halloweens, even that ended when I turned about thirteen, and I really didn’t think much of October 31 until fourteen years ago and Maggie’s advent. And since she announced about three months ago that her trick-or-treating days were past and she was entering the candy handing-out years, I assumed I’d settle back into the kind of Halloweens I’d spent most of my life celebrating. But that was before our family expanded by one little dog. And now, I’ve been told that Coco Chanel needs to be decked out for Halloween. As a matter of fact, as I write this, she’s lying on the floor dressed like a pumpkin. All of sudden Halloween is acquiring a whole new meaning, and that’s a change.

Image result for all saints day
But I’ll tell you, what hasn’t changed is how I and in fact most folks view the day after, and I’m talking about November 1. You see, the day after Halloween is All Saints Day, a time when even churches that believe in what’s called the “Sainthood of All Believers” can remember and celebrate some of our great Christian forefathers and mothers. But for most Protestants, this day isn’t even a blip on our spiritual radar. It passes without a thought. In fact, it fades in the green-tinted light of Halloween. You see, even though Coco will wear three different customs in the next four days, I’m absolutely confident that she’ll never be dressed as Martin Luther, John Calvin or Karl Barth.

And even though I think it would be silly if not out-and-out weird to dress children and pets as your favorite theologian, I believe it’s a shame that we don’t spend at least a little time thanking God for what they continue to offer us. For instance, they brought a new appreciation of the written word, the Bible, claiming that it’s so much more than just a sacred text you read and preserve, something more suited to a glass case in a museum and an actual book with well-worn pages. In fact, they took the Bible so seriously they did more than just read it; they also interpreted it so that it could speak with power and authority within a world where the only thing constant is change. For them, this was a living word, one that the Spirit is constantly making new and relevant. And on the day after Halloween, that’s something we can remember.

Image result for sinners loved by godJust like we can remember what some of the great reformers said about us. And even though it’s not always what we’d like to hear, it certainly can serve as a reality check. I mean, when they wrote that the extent of our sin is total and that even our best efforts fall short of God’s ideal, that was a reminder of both of how our abilities are limited as well as how God’s love is boundless. And I’ll tell you, both are important for us to know. I mean, humility is only possible when we have a healthy understanding of our natural limitations, and I include all those limits to our power and longevity and knowledge. But when I also recognize the eternal and omnipresent nature of divine love, I can feel peace, trusting that God is able to do more than me on my very best day. You see, this is something else we can remember.

Image result for future salvationAnd finally, when we think about those faithful men and women in whose footsteps we walk, we can remember what they said about the future. You see, for them our ultimate destiny was never and will never be grounded in us, in either our words or work. And even though what we say and do is important, we lack the power to manipulate God and to negate the promise offered by the Apostle Paul when he wrote that “...nothing in all creation can separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.” You see, because God loves us and he holds our ultimate future in his hands, we can look forward with hope, trusting that, when the final chapter is written, God wins and so will his children. On November 1, we can remember this too.

Now, like I said, this will be a new kind of Halloween for me, because the pumpkin dog has now entered my life. And maybe this change will carry over to the day after. You see, maybe on this All Saints Day I’ll be able to set aside a little time to think about those brave and brilliant men and women who’ve enabled me to see my Bible and myself and my future in a radically different way.

Growing in Grace: On the Road Again - Introduction

Growing in Grace: On the Road Again - Introduction: Below are notes from discussion in a series entitled "On the Road Again: A Study of Luke/Acts. This week we discussed the background in...

Sunday's Minute for Mission - Reformation Sunday

Over the past few years, three members of my very Protestant extended family have become Roman Catholic. All of these conversions were undertaken with little or no contact with the other persons. These shifts have deepened the question that all of us face, particularly on Reformation Day: What is the future of Protestantism, particularly Reformed Protestantism?
Reformation Wall in Geneva
Reformation Wall in Geneva
In our Book of Order we say that we are distinguished from Roman Catholics by three watchwords: grace alone, faith alone, Scripture alone. But very few if any of us would maintain that those distinctions are still the fundamental issues that divide us from Roman Catholics. The past few years have brought us a major agreement on justification by the Lutherans and Catholics, and many Protestants admit to open admiration for the current pope. I even think of my own children who learned more about the Bible from attending a Roman Catholic VBS than from the VBS at our home Presbyterian Church.
In our Book of Order we find: “The church affirms Ecclesia reformata, semper reformanda secundum verbum Dei, that is, ‘The church reformed, always to be reformed according to the Word of God’ in the power of the Spirit [F-2.02].” If this is indeed true, then we need to ask: What kind of re-forming are we called to in a time when our previous re-forming doesn’t make the same kind of sense that it used to?
Along with remembering and appreciating the past, on this Reformation Day, let us look to the future, to what God may be calling us to, as people called by God, justified by Christ, and sent by the Spirit.
Charles Wiley, Associate Director, Theology, Formation, and Evangelism, Presbyterian Mission Agency
Let us pray
Gracious God, you have called us to faithfulness to your son, Jesus Christ. Guide us through your Spirit, that we may be faithful to you in the future as your saints have been faithful to you in the past. Give us openness to a future we cannot see.
In Christ’s name we pray. Amen.

Thursday, October 27, 2016

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - A Light in the Basement

Below is a new devotion I just left on the Cove Presbyterian Church prayer line. You can find a recording of this devotion on the prayer line (1-304-748-7900) or on the Cove Presbyterian Church Podbean page. You might also want to visit the congregational website (covepresbyterian.org) for more church information.

If you find this devotion meaningful, please consider supporting this ministry by sending an offering to Cove Presbyterian Church, 3404 Main Street, Weirton, West Virginia or through PayPal. And no contribution is too small.


Nahum 1:15

Look! On the mountains the feet of one
     who brings good tidings,
     who proclaims peace!
Celebrate your festivals, O Judah,
     fulfill your vows,
for never again shall the wicked invade you;
     they are utterly cut off.

A Light in the Basement
Image result for dark basement

Yesterday, when I got home from the church, it was already dark outside. In October, the days just get shorter, and the night comes earlier. And since we got our puppy, I generally come in through the basement. It seems to be a little less disruptive if I don’t step directly in the room where Coco Chanel is hanging out. Anyway, as I went up to the basement door, I was pretty sure that it was as dark inside as it was outside. And I really hate that, because our basement floor is like a minefield. In fact, I remember one time falling flat on my face, because I tripped over a piece of exercise equipment I’ll start using again one of these days. And so, as I put my key in the lock, I was sure I’d be feeling my way through the books and the boxes and the bowflex that will someday be both bowing and flexing. But as I opened the door, I saw a light on the far side of the room, right above the stairs to the kitchen. And I’ve got to tell you, I was relieved. You see, even though the room was still dark and the floor cluttered, that one light bulb was going to give me the ability to move across the room without falling.

And you know, that’s what this verse did in the book of Nahum and can do for us as we move through life. I mean, if you’ve ever read the prophesy of Nahum, it’s really pretty bleak, with a lot of talk of judgement and punishment. And as we move through life, we’re going to encounter of a lot of stuff we’d much rather see in the light than in the dark, and I’m talking about things that can really trip us up. But just like that bulb in the basement, Nahum gave his people and he gives us a little light in the gloom. You see, he offers us a reminder that, in spite of what we’re facing, a time will come when things will dramatically improve. And this is something of which we can be sure, because the one making the promise is the lord and creator of the universe.

The Happenings Around the Presbytery - October 26, 2016



Upper Ohio Valley Presbytery
907 National Road
Wheeling, WV  26003
304-232-3490

Office Hours: Monday through Thursday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
In an emergency after office hours: Call 740-359-1813




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PLEASE CONTINUE TO KEEP IN YOUR PRAYERS:
Bill Betteridge
Karen Edwards
Ed Mooney
Leura Nancy Macon
Ronald Wolf
Jack Visser
Nancy Mountz
David Brocklehurst
Bob & Sue Shearer
Ed Rudiger
R. H. “Mac” McCuen
All our service men & women
Ginny Zoric
Karen Byrne
Delbert McNear
Helen Beatty
Hayden Kestner
Dakota Partnership
Alberta Crawford

Domasi Partnership
Malawi food crisis


Please keep us informed of any prayer concerns you may have.
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PRAYER FOR UOVP PASTORS: Select one of these pastors and remember him/her in your prayers this week: Karen Edwards, Jason Elliott, Joe Ellis, Stan Fedyszyn, Cindy Foster.
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PLEASANT VALLEY PRESBYTERIAN Church, 5360 National Road at the foot of Blaine Hill, Exit 220 off of I-70, invites you to join them Tuesday, November 1, 2016, for Blaine First Tuesday: 5:15 p.m. Gathering and Silent Meditation, 5:30 – 6:00 p.m. Vigil for the Nation. As part of a sequence of first Tuesday services, Pleasant Valley Presbyterian Church will host a time of silent prayer for the nation in the final week before the 2016 elections. Leave your politics at the door and join together in meditation on the word of God and in prayer for the nation, for those in need in our community, and for those recovering from natural disasters and political unrest around the globe.
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THE PEACEMAKING Subcommittee will again show the PCUSA video 'Trigger' before the next presbytery meeting, at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, November 15th, at the First Presbyterian Church, Moundsville. All are invited.
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COLUMBIA SEMINARY to Host AAAS Lecture on Animal Intelligence. Decatur, GA—Columbia Theological Seminary has invited Dr. Frans de Waal, the C. H. Candler Professor of Psychology at Emory University and Director of the Living Links Center at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta to be the next lecturer as part of its “Science for Seminaries” program sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). On November 2, 2016, at 11:00 am, Dr. de Waal will present his talk “Are we Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?” This event is open to the public in the Ellis Room of the Richards Center on the Columbia Seminary campus located at 701 S. Columbia Drive, Decatur, GA near Atlanta. For more info about the lecture or speaker, contact Patty.
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PRAYER PARTNER REQUESTED. The Rev. Jafali Asidi who spoke at our April Presbytery meeting is requesting a prayer partner from Upper Ohio Valley Presbytery for one of his churches, the Kawiya Congregation. Pastors in Malawi typically have 3 or 4 churches and a couple of prayer houses (a prayer house is any church with fewer than 200 in worship). If your church does not currently have a partner and seeks one, please call Steve Cramer at 330-921-1115 after November 6. (Pastor Cramer is leading a pilgrimage to Israel October 28 - November 6.)
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LAUGHLIN MEMORIAL CHAPEL, 129½ 18th St., Wheeling, invites you to Ms. Debbie Miller’s Laughlin Chapel Girls’ Club Sunday Chicken Dinner Fundraiser on Sunday, November 6th, 12 Noon to 3:00 p.m. Dinners include your choice of chicken (fried or oven baked) sweet potatoes/mashed potatoes, greens, green beans, salad and rolls, and a variety of desserts from which to choose. $8.50 adults, $6.50 kids 12 and under. Carry out and delivery available. Call 304-232-2630 or 740-359-0219 for tickets and information.
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LAUGHLIN MEMORIAL CHAPEL CHRISTMAS: Suggested items on the kids’ wish list can be found on our website under Spotlight. This year Chapel enrollment has greatly increased; any and all gifts and donations will be greatly appreciated. The Chapel would like to have items no later than Monday or Tuesday, November 21stor 22nd. They will be at the Chapel from 8:30 am to 6:00 pm. They are at 129½ 18th St., Wheeling. This will give them the last days in November to prepare for the kids’ party as they are closed in December. If you can’t get out to shop, monetary donations for Christmas gifts will be accepted as they have some special Chapel elves who will do the shopping. Mail your check, payable to Laughlin Memorial Chapel, to the Chapel at PO Box 6195, Wheeling, WV 26003. Memo line: Christmas. They would like to have this by Monday or Tuesday, November 21st or 22nd, (the Chapel will be closed November 23 through 27) and their elves can shop the last days in November. If you have any questions or concerns, please call the Chapel at 304-232-2630. Thank you for your generosity and support!
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NOVEMBER prayer requests are on our website under Spotlight and in the calendar.
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STONE PRESBYTERIAN Church, 25 E. Cove Ave., Elm Grove, Wheeling, invites you to their Christmas Rummage Sale on Friday, November 18, 9 am - 2 pm, and Saturday, November 19, 9 am - noon. We will have items related to Christmas – wreaths, trees, ornaments, bows, wrapping paper, and items that may be thought of as traditional Christmas gifts such as: games, puzzles, etc.
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HAPPY BIRTHDAY: Nov. 2 ~ R. H. “Mac” McCuen, Jr., macinthemorning@yahoo.com


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Do not pray for an easy life; pray to be a stronger person.
Do not pray for tasks equal to your powers but for powers equal to your tasks.
Then the doing of your work shall be no miracle, but you will be the miracle.
Every day you shall wonder at yourself and the richness of life which has come to you by the grace of God. 
 –Phillips Brooks
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PRESBYTERIAN PEACE AND JUSTICE newsletter October, 2016, “Protecting Our Earth” can be found on our website under the Mission sidebar, then click on Peacemaking; or control+click here.
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FREE ‘CEASELESS’ PRAYER APP: Chris Lim, a ruling elder in the Indonesian Presbyterian Church in Seattle, Washingtongave up his job as a software engineer at Amazon to follow God’s call to develop ‘Ceaseless,’ a free personal prayer app for IOS and Android devices. The app’s far-reaching goal is for the body of Christ—the church—to pray for everyone on earth! Learn more and download ‘Ceaseless’.
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PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY Newsletter October 2016 can be found on our website under Items of Interest.
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THIS WEEK’S PCUSA NEWS: (control+click)
International Peacemakers wrap up US visitsGroup says it’s encouraged by interactions with congregations.
Presbyterian ministries call for end to violence and sexual abuseOctober is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.
Stated Clerk to lead live-streamed Reformation worship service Nov. 2“Write the Vision—Reclaim the Call” is the theme of a church-wide Reformation worship service being led by the Reverend Dr. J. Herbert Nelson, II.
Presbyterians called to take a stand against sexual and gender-based violenceThe World Health Organization (WHO) reports that one in three women experience physical or sexual violence, most likely from an intimate partner.
Award-winning PC(USA) documentaries are resources for congregationsPDA ministry creates stories to address social justice issues, equip and organize for action.
Parts of coastal Carolina are still underwater following Hurricane MatthewPresbyterian churches mobilize to assist those in need.
Embracing the sacraments and the communityPittsburgh church forges bond between faith, education and outreach.
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$250,000 SCHOLARSHIP to Support Louisville Seminary's Marriage and Family Therapy Program: Fully-endowed scholarship is latest to benefit the Covenant Tuition Plan. The Betty Kilgore Gibbs Scholarship for Marriage and Family Therapy is the latest fully-endowed, full-tuition scholarship to be offered at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary. The $250,000 scholarship funding, received by Louisville Seminary on October 4, 2016, will support students in the seminary's Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy degree program. Betty Gibbs is the founder of the Kilgore Samaritan Counseling Center in Louisville, Kentucky. The center is a faith-based nonprofit counseling center whose staff of counselors and therapists have both theological and counseling training. Gibbs' husband, George, serves as chair of the center's board of directors. "Betty Kilgore Gibbs has long been committed to providing high-quality pastoral counseling in the Louisville community through the Kilgore Center," said Louisville Seminary President Michael Jinkins. "With this generous gift, she makes it possible for generations of therapists to receive the finest education and training possible to serve in our community and beyond." The Gibbs scholarship was received as part of Louisville Seminary's Covenant for the Future capital campaign, the cornerstone of which provides 100 percent tuition assistance for all master's-level students. In addition to the Gibbs scholarship, three other fully-endowed tuition scholarships were received during seminary's capital campaign. They are the Ross C. Royce Endowed Scholarship, the Nancy S. and James Britt Davis Scholarship, and the Joan M. and William F. Edmonds Scholarship. The Rev. Arnold O. Schaap Presidential Scholarship was also established during the Covenant campaign. Louisville Seminary presidential scholarships cover tuition as well as fees, books and living expenses. Many other contributions were made to the general scholarship fund, which made the Covenant for the Future tuition scholarship program possible. Students who do not receive a scholarship are eligible to receive a Covenant Tuition Grant, which covers the cost of tuition for the duration of the student's time at Louisville Seminary. In an ongoing effort to relieve the burden of tuition debt as well as housing, the seminary has recently initiated several additional scholarship drives, which are currently open to be funded. "We promised to liberate our students from tuition debt so they can go wherever God calls them," said Jinkins. "Our graduates - the church's newest ministers, counselors and chaplains - carry the hope for the future of our church and society. Our robust scholarship program helps us fulfill that promise." For more information about Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary's scholarship opportunities, see www.lpts.edu/scholarships.
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THE FOLLOWING ITEMS HAVE BEEN PREVIOUSLY RUN:
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STONE PRESBYTERIAN Church, 25 East Cove Ave., Elm Grove, Wheeling, will hold a country music concert with the Honky Tonk Sweethearts Sunday, October 30th, in the sanctuary at 2:00 p.m. A free will offering will be collected. Artisans on Call will be on hand from 12:45 - 1:45 p.m. with a collection of locally handcrafted treasures for your shopping pleasure. Handmade goods such as candles, jewelry, specialty foods, quilts, cards, soaps, water color paintings, and more. For more information, call the church office at 304-242-4610.
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THE HOUSE OF THE CARPENTER, 200 S. Front St., Wheeling, invites youth leaders, Sunday School teachers, parents, guardians, and other caregivers to join them for a workshop on teen depression and suicide on Sunday, October 30, from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. The Rev. Gary Nelson will provide information on recognizing the signs and symptoms of depression as well as information on seeking appropriate care. To register, contact Kate Rhodes krhodes@houseofthecarpenter.com or 304-233-4640.
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COVE PRESBYTERIAN Church, 3404 Main St., Weirton, WV, invites you to our Project Christmas Smile Annual Spaghetti Dinner, Sunday, November 6th, from noon till 1:30 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Adults can dine for $5.00 and children under 10 for $3.00. All proceeds will go to our Christmas outreach to the children in our area. In addition to the posted menu, meatless sauce will be available upon request.
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DO YOU LIKE TO WRITE STORIES? We have something which might interest you. It is “A Writing Fiesta for the Young and Young at Heart.” We are looking for stories which focus on Giving the Gift of Peace at Christmas. This is sponsored by the UOVP Peacemaking Subcommittee. The stories can be non-fiction or fiction. Word limit—500. Prizes will be given. All authors who submit stories give permission to the Peacemaking Committee to have their stories published on our new, soon to be launched, peacemaking website. We encourage persons of any age to submit your story by e-mail to storyteller1001@comcast.net. These can be stories which actually happened or made up stories. Please bear in the mind the focus—Giving the Gift of Peace at Christmas. Questions? Contact storyteller1001@comcast.net.
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HOST CHURCHES are needed for Presbytery Meetings. Would you like your congregation to host a presbytery meeting? These are the 2017 stated meeting dates:
Saturday, January 28, 2017 - 9:30 a.m. Worship & Business Meeting; 12:00 p.m. Lunch
Tuesday, April 25, 2017 - 5:00 p.m. Dinner, 6:00 p.m. Business Meeting
Tuesday, September 26, 2017 - 5:00 p.m. Dinner, 6:00 p.m. Business Meeting
Tuesday, November 28, 2017 - 5:00 p.m. Dinner, 6:00 p.m. Business Meeting
If your session would like to invite presbytery to meet at your church, please send an e-mail toscuovp@gmail.com, the Rev. Dr. Frank Lewis, Stated Clerk, stating the date you will be available.
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2017 LITURGICAL COLORS CALENDAR: To find a printable liturgical calendar with the liturgical colors for paraments, go to http://www.pcusa.org/site_media/media/uploads/planningcalendar/pdfs/2017-liturgical-colors.pdf, or you can find it on our website www.uovpresby.org under Spotlight, or let me know and I can mail you a hard copy.
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PITTSBURGH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY Continuing Ed newsletter October 2016 can be found on our website under Seminaries.
UNION PRESBYTERIAN SEMINARY newsletter October 2016 can be found on our website under Seminaries.
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PCUSA WINTER CURRICULUM begins December 4. The Feasting on the Word curriculum explores lectionary passages in ways suitable for all ages: childrenyouthyoung adults, and adultsThere's also a special resource for pastors that includes weekly children's bulletins. With this unique approach, the curriculum connects worship and faith formation like no other lectionary curriculum ever has. Including both downloadable and print-and-ship options, along with seasonal, 9-month, and 12-month purchase options, educators and pastors of all types of congregations will be able to find what works for them. You can save money with total church plansand if you're a small church (under 50 congregants), we also have plans specifically for you. The Winter curriculum covers every Sunday from December 4, 2016, to February 26, 2017.
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PRESBYTERIAN DISASTER ASSISTANCE (PDA) urges your support for those affected by Hurricane Matthew. The needs for the response will be great. God’s people are once again called on to stand in the “GAP”—Give. Act. Pray.
GIVE. Financial support for relief efforts can be designated to DR000193-Matthew-SE USA or to DR000193-Matthew-Haiti and/or Cuba. Gifts can be made online, by phone (800) 872-3283, or by check, which can be mailed to Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), P.O. Box 643700, Pittsburgh, PA 15264-3700. Or send your check to the Presbytery Office, payable to UOVP with memo DR000193-Matthew-SE USA or to DR000193-Matthew-Haiti and/or Cuba, and we will send your funds on to PDA.
ACT. Learn how you and your congregation can help families who have lost everything in the devastation. Stay informed and like us on Facebook, download resources, and share updates with your congregation.
PRAY. Pray for those who suffered loss of family or home or for those who are working tirelessly to provide rescue, humanitarian aid, and spiritual and psychological support.
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Control+click: Clean up begins in Haiti following Hurricane MatthewInternational appeal for assistance in the region.
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Control+click: 2016 Advent Devotions: Reflections on Mass Incarceration and Immigrant Detention.Proclaiming the Good News of God’s Peace’ available from church store.
Control+click: PC(USA) issues updated guidelines on election activities for religious organizationsList includes allowed and impermissible political actions.
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NEIGHBORS HELPING NEIGHBORS Annual Food Drive: To help our neighbors who are hungry, non-perishable food will be collected November 1–30, 2016. Please contact Lisa Werner at 304-234-9221 orwerner@wesbanco.com to schedule a pick-up of collected items. Food will be distributed to local agencies including Laughlin Memorial Chapel. Watch for the food drive video on Comcast newsmakers.
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SEE WHAT’S NEW in this year’s Presbyterian Giving Catalog: CLUCKS, OINKS, AND OVER 40 GIFTS THAT CREATE BIG IMPACT. We can’t wait for you to see the 2016 – 2017 Presbyterian Giving CatalogNew catalogs should be available in your church soon, but you can get a sneak peek at this year’s new items in the online catalog. This year’s catalog features gifts that support sustainable farming and access to safe water, provide basic necessities for disaster relief, and support Presbyterian youth and young adults in their spiritual growth and mission work. Visit the online catalog today, and choose a gift in support of a cause close to your heart.
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PRESBYTERIAN OLDER ADULT MINISTRIES Network Resource Guide for Older Adult Ministries, ISSUE 43, Autumn 2016 newsletter. Click here to download and read the complete Autumn PNN.
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IN THE FALL OF 2017, Upper Ohio Valley Presbytery will again be sending people to our partner Presbytery, the Domasi Presbytery in Malawi. Is God calling you to make this journey of faith? Many have found this to be a life changing and faith enriching experience. This is a wonderful opportunity for some new folks to have their faith deepened. If you have questions or concerns, here are some of the folks from the Presbytery who have made that journey listed below. Feel free to ask them about the wonderful experiences they had: Dody Crowell, Becky Boggs, Mary McElroy, Nancy DeStefano, Samuel Monte, Homer Harden, Tanta Luckhardt-Hendricks, Frank Lewis, Steve Cramer, Karen Edwards, Laurie Armstrong, Kelly McPherson.
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INTERNATIONALLY KNOWN COMPOSER and performer Dr. Calvin Taylor will lead worship at Trinity Presbyterian Church, 110 Maine Blvd., East Liverpool, OH, at 11:00 a.m. on Sunday, November 20. There will be a free concert open to the public sponsored by the East Liverpool Learning and Community Center at 4:00 p.m. also on the 20th. Dr. Taylor is a composer, internationally known recorder and performer. Never far from his roots in religious music, Taylor has traveled for many years throughout the U.S.A. presenting thousands of concerts in America's churches. Well-known publications by Calvin Taylor include Spirituals for Piano and The Patriotic Piano. Altogether Taylor has recorded 11 CDs. Dr. Taylor has toured throughout the world, playing in North and South America, Europe, the Far East, and most recently in Russia and Ukraine. As arranger and composer, his music has been heard and enjoyed by untold thousands. For more info:http://calvintaylormusic.org/.
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