Tuesday, February 28, 2017

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for February 28, 2017

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for February 28, 2017: Today our passages are Leviticus 22:17–23:44; Mark 9:30–10:12; Psalm 44:1-8; and Proverbs 10:19 . The readings are the Contempora...

Monday, February 27, 2017

Sunday's Sermon - A Good Scout Listens

Below is a copy of the sermon I preached on Sunday, February 26, in Cove Presbyterian Church, Weirton, West Virginia. You can find a podcast of this sermon on the Cove Podbean page. You might also want to visit the congregational website (covepresbyterian.org) for more church information.

If you find this sermon meaningful, please consider supporting this ministry by sending an offering to Cove Presbyterian Church, 3404 Main Street, Weirton, West Virginia or through PayPal.


I’ll tell you, having some of the Cub and Weeblos and Boy Scouts with us this morning, man, I think it’s great. And when you consider the number of years Cove has supported scouting, I’ll tell you, we’ve been together longer than Red and Bonnie have been married, at least I think that’s the case. And I feel that I’ve really been fortunate to be a small part of that relationship for almost ten years. And during that time, I’ve had the chance to observe a lot of scouts, because my office is right across the hall from the pop machine, usually the most important spot on Monday nights.

And so based on what I’ve seen, and having been a scout when I was a teenager about twenty years ago, I think I can say that, even though the Scout Law says that “a scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean, and reverent,” the one characteristic about a good scout that’s not in the law, and I’m talking about a really good scout, in my opinion, is that a good scout listens.

A good scout listens. He listens to the camp director when he says, “Even though they may look cute, don’t try to cuddle with a bear.” And he listens to his fellow scout when he says, “I really don’t think it’s a good idea to whittle blind folded.” And he listens to his Scout Master when he says, “You’ll never make it to Gettysburg if you haven’t ridden your bike since you took off the training wheels.” You see, a good scout listens.

But that shouldn’t really be a surprise; I mean, this listening stuff really applies to everybody, right? I mean, let’s get real, life is certainly easier and better when you listen. And if you have any doubt, ask any girl who’s texting her boyfriend while her teacher is reviewing for the final exam or any boy
who’s thinking about the game as his girlfriend tells him exactly what she wants for her birthday. I’ll tell you, listening is the foundation of every good relationship, it certainly is of any solid marriage, am I not right Red?

As a matter of fact, it’s something we all really need to do if we’re serious about things like getting a diploma or staying employed or keeping a spouse. And it’s certainly important in the Bible. Just listen to what it says in Proverbs, and if you don’t know about Proverbs, for the most part, it’s a collection of common sense sayings. For example, in one place, it says, “Fools think they know what is best, but a sensible person listens to advice.” And a little bit later on, this is what it says: “It makes a lot of sense to be a person of few words and to stay calm. Even fools seem smart when they are quiet.” And in the New Testament, the Letter of James: “My dear friends, you should be quick to listen and slow to speak or to get angry. If you are angry, you cannot do any of the good things that God wants done. You must stop doing anything immoral or evil.  Instead be humble and accept the message that is planted in you to save you.” And so, I think I’m safe in saying that listening is pretty important.

And that’s why I think it’s such a shame that a lot of folks, maybe a lot of us really aren’t very good at it. I mean, let’s get real, often we don’t listen very well. And as Debbie will tell you in a heartbeat, I definitely include myself. And you know, I think there are two primary reasons why it’s a problem. I mean, on one hand, I think often we just don’t care what the other person is saying, and so we don’t listen. And more often than not, we feel that way, because we think we already know what he’s is about to say, you know, like this guy.



You see, sometimes we don’t listen, because we don’t care. On the other hand, sometimes we’re afraid of what we might hear. My gosh, what if I’m all excited, because I think it’s a great idea or it’s the perfect job or it’s exactly what God has called me to do, what’s the worse thing that can happen? I’ll tell you what it is; to have a wise guy question the decision I’ve already made. Man, it makes you feel like a deflated balloon. And so sometimes we don’t listen out of fear.

But you know, whether it’s not caring or being afraid, the results of self-imposed deafness, man, they’re always bad. For example, it may keep us in the dark about things we could understand. Or it may put a strain on our relationships, including the one we have with God. Or it may result in this. something even worst, like this.



Let’s just say, not listening ain’t good. And I’ve got to tell you, it’s even worst when you’re not listening to God.

But right now, I’ve got some good news for you, and here it is: not unlike the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl, we can turn it around. In other words, right now, we can decide to be better listeners, better listeners with one another and better listeners to God. And we can accomplish this by doing two very simple things.

You see, we can listen better, first, by simply closing our mouths. It’s like Judge Judy loves to say, “There’s a reason God gave us two ears and one mouth.” Or as Abe Lincoln said, “Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt.” And I’ll tell you, I think it’s something that would cause James to say, “Amen,” because remember in the passage we read from his letter a little while ago, he wrote, “My dear friends, you should be quick to listen and slow to speak...”  If we’re serious about listening, we really need to stop talking, even though I recognize that stopping may be a challenge. I mean, we may think, just like the guy in the video, that we really know what’s about to be said; therefore, it’s a waste of time waiting. And we might honestly believe that, even if we don’t know, we’re just plain smarter and what we have to say has to be a whole lot more interesting anyway. Therefore, why listen, when they could be benefitting from what we have to say. We’ve got to stop talking, and that also includes thinking about what we’re going to say later, you know, when the other person finally shuts up. To listen, first, we need to close our mouths.

And second, we better focus our minds, you know, so we can take in what’s being said. Do y’all remember those old commercials for the Negro College Fund? Their slogan was “a mind is a terrible thing to waste.” Well, I think we’re really wasting it, if we choose not to focus it. In other words, when we’re in a conversation, we might need to focus our attention on those who are speaking. And when we’re supposed to be listening to some instructions or advice, we might need to focus our concentration on the one who may just know more than us. And when we’re reading our Bibles or discussing Scripture or listening to something like, oh maybe a sermon, we might need to focus our minds intentionally, and not think about what we’re going to order at Bob Evans later. You see, for those who are serious about listening, the closing of the mouth and the focusing of the mind, man, both are really important.

And even though doing these two things may also be pretty difficult, I just want you to consider what we might receive as a result. You see, for one, when we listen, it’s got to increase our understanding. It’s got to make us smarter. Dah. Of course, we don’t have to buy everything that everyone is selling; that would be stupid. I mean, the more we listen, the more dumb stuff we’re going to hear. But I’ll tell you, among all the junk, there’s also a lot of gems, a lot of nuggets of information we just might miss, a lot of treasures hidden in fields and pearls of great value that we’ll never know about, if we’ve decided to close ourselves down and off. You see, it’s like a professor told me a long time ago. He said that he saw his mind as these two rooms. In the outer room, he took in everything but only a few ideas, a few principles, a few beliefs made it into that inner room, the one that defined who he really was and that guided what he actually did. If we decide to go through our lives with blinders, we can only blame ourselves if we miss some powerful, maybe even life-changing truth God has put it little bit to the side. When we listen, we’re going to learn. And when we learn, we’ll also going to understand. And that’s one reason why listening is important.

But that’s not the only positive thing that’s going to happen. You see, second, when we close our mouths and focus our minds, I think we’ll also see our relationships strengthen. Let me explain. Now you’ve got to trust me on this, there are few things that people enjoy more than having someone think they’re important enough to be heard. And that goes for parents and children, for teachers and students, for bosses and employees. Man, it even goes for preachers and Scout leaders. We’ll have better relationship with others when we listen to them. I think the same thing happens with God. Now, let me be clear about this. I believe God couldn’t love us more than he does right this minute. And since God is eternal, his love for us was the same yesterday just like it will be the same tomorrow. And so listening to God isn’t going to make him love us more; that would be impossible. But I do believe our decision to listen will move us closer to him, because not only will we understand more and more the incredible future he’s already prepared for us, we’ll also have a much better idea what he’d like us to do and how he’d like us to live in the meantime. And along with increasing our understanding, listening will strengthen our relationships, and that’s the second reason it’s important.

Now I doubt that the Scout Law is going to be changed anytime soon, but still, I believe that a good scout is also a good listener. And so is a good student and a good employee and a good spouse and a good Christian. And even though it’s not something that a lot folks do very well, our ability to listen can certainly improve, because starting today, we can be better listeners by closing our mouths and focusing our minds. And I’ll tell you, when we do, our understanding will increase and our relationships will strengthen. And so I think you can say, when we listen, we all become pretty good scouts.

Sunday's Sermon - Rethinking Mountaintops

Below is a copy of the sermon I preached on Sunday, February 26, in Two Ridges Presbyterian Church, Wintersville, Ohio. You can find a podcast of this sermon on the Cove Podbean page. You might also want to visit the congregational website (covepresbyterian.org) for more church information.

If you find this sermon meaningful, please consider supporting this ministry by sending an offering to Cove Presbyterian Church, 3404 Main Street, Weirton, West Virginia or through PayPal.


Matthew 17:1-9

And after six days, Jesus took along Peter and James and John, his brother, and led them up onto a high mountain by themselves. And he was changed before them, and his face shone like the sun, and his clothes became white as light. And behold, Moses and Elijah appeared to them, and they were talking with him. And Peter answered and said to Jesus, “Lord, it is good that we are here. If you want, then I will make three booths: one for you and one for Moses and one for Elijah.” And while he was speaking, behold a bright cloud enveloped them, and behold a voice from the cloud said, “He is my son, the beloved one, in whom I am well pleased. Listen to him.” And when the disciples heard they fell upon their faces, and they were very much afraid. And Jesus came and touched them and said, “Arise and don’t be afraid.” And when they lifted up their eyes, they saw no one except Jesus by himself.

And as they were going down from the mountain, Jesus commanded them, saying, “Don’t tell anyone the vision until the son of man from death might be raised.

Rethinking Mountaintops

Remember, oh, about a month ago; during worship, we remembered the baptism of Christ, and I told you every year, on the first Sunday after Epiphany, if you follow the lectionary, you focus on exactly the same thing. Well, on the last Sunday after Epiphany, you know, the one right before we enter Lent and start looking toward Easter, we do the same thing, only this time it’s with the transfiguration, that time Jesus went up to the top of the mountain and was changed right there in front of God and everybody and then started talking to Moses and Elijah, who actually looked pretty good, especially considering the fact that they’d both been dead for quite a while. But you know, it’s really kind of neat, the way this works out. I mean, the season of Epiphany starts with a voice from heaven saying, “He is my son, the beloved one, in whom I am well pleased” and ends with that same voice saying, “He is my son, the beloved one, in whom I am well pleased. Listen to him.”

Image result for transfiguration
Anyway, each year this same story comes up from either Matthew, Mark or Luke, this year we’re in Matthew, and because of that, I’ve written a lot of sermons dealing with the Transfiguration. And you know, it’s interesting, looking over some of the old stuff I’ve preached, well, in the past I seem to have spent a lot of time warning people about what we call “mountaintop experiences.” Now, if you haven’t been around the church, you may not know what I’m talking about. Let me explain. A mountaintop experience is a time when, for whatever reason, you feel really, really close to God. Now a lot of times it happens when you’re at church camp or on a retreat, maybe even a mission trip of some kind, you know, a time when you’re away from your every day lives and almost surrounded by the presence of God. Of course, you don’t need to be in the middle of the woods to feel this special closeness. Man, you reach the mountaintop by going down into your basement if that’s a place where you can pray and meditate. And I’ll tell you, if you’ve had one, it can be an incredible, maybe even life-changing experience, one that you may never forget. Sort of like what Jesus and more particularly his disciples experienced in the passage we just read. Now that’s what I mean by a mountaintop experience.

And like I said, for years, I used this story to kind of warn people about this stuff, and I’ll tell you why. Not only did I believe mountaintops can tempt folks to try to escape or ignore the often harsh realities in the real world, I’ve also known some very dedicated believers who seem to spend their entire lives trying to recreate something they experienced at church camp when they were in high school. And I’ll tell you, if you spend your life looking backwards, it’s pretty hard to move forward. And so, when preaching the transfiguration, I’d generally remind the people that although being on a mountain may be nice and fun for a while, life is lived in the valley below. It’s sort of like cotton candy: it tastes good but you wouldn’t be very healthy if that’s all you had. In other words, I preached that all this stuff can make us so heavenly-minded that we’re no earthly good. Now, in a nutshell, that was my view of the top.

But you know, in the last, oh, I’d say six months or so, I’ve been rethinking mountaintops in general, you know, the kind of experiences we’ve been talking about this morning, and in particular, what happened to those disciples at the transfiguration, and I’ll tell you why. I can’t see any reason why mountaintop experiences couldn’t do for us the same thing they did for Peter and James and John. I mean, I don’t see why they can’t refocus our attention and remind us of our savior and then return us to our world, refreshed, renewed and ready to do the things God has called us to do. And that’s why I’m rethinking mountaintops, but let me explain.

Image result for transfiguration
First, like I said, I’m coming to believe that going to the top of the mountain can really refocus our attention, in other words, it can help us put our lives and our work and our values in the proper perspective, in a more Godly perspective. And in my book, boy is that necessary now a days, because from where I stand, there’s an awful lot of over-stressed people running around. And that shouldn’t come as any kind of surprise. Man, we’ve got stress coming from work and family and take it from me, the church. We’re pressured by responsibilities and expectations that seem mighty high right when time and help are in short supply, and I’m not just talking about Maggie’s Birthday slash sleep-over a couple of day ago. I mean give me a break, I think there are times when we all feel over scheduled and underfunded, overloaded and understaffed, overwhelmed and underappreciated. And even though it may not send us screaming into the night, it sure wear’s on us, doesn’t it? And I’ll tell you, when we’re right in the middle of this mess, that’s when we need to look to the mountaintop, in other words, seek out those quiet and simple moments with God. And although we may find them in the middle of the woods or swinging a hammer on a Habitat for Humanity project, we can also feel God’s presence when we simply slow down, get quiet and start listening for that still small voice. And you know, it’s amazing, when we do, I’m convinced the stress is going to ease, and we’ll be able to appreciate the gifts that we have, whether it’s the job that sometimes drives us crazy but also pays the bills or the child that sometimes we may swear is going to put us in an early grace but who has also filling our lives with joy and beauty and hope or the God that we sometimes push aside and try to ignore, but who has never stopped loving us. You see, mountaintops can help us refocus on what’s really significant and for me that’s the first reason they’re important.

Image result for transfigurationAnd second, I’m telling you, they can also remind us of the one we call savior, and of course I’m talking about Jesus Christ. I mean, it’s when we’re on the mountaintop, when we’re closest to God, it’s then we can share the experience of those disciples. For example, when we’re quiet, in prayer or meditation, that we can get a glimpse of his glory, a glory that shone from his face at transfiguration and that we can see when we remember the life he lived and the love he showed. But not only that, I think we can also know his importance, because not only is he still above every other lawgiver and prophet in human history, I’m telling you, that voice from the cloud still speaks, it speaks right to us, it still interrupt what we’re saying and tells us to listen to him, to listen to the beloved son of God, to listen to what he taught and preached, lessons and sermons we can find right here in the Bible, if we take the time to look and follow. Man, we can be reminded of the glory and the importance, but again, that’s not all. We can also feel his care. You know, it’s amazing, in the passage we read, when those disciples were down on their faces, trembling with fear, Jesus went to them, and he “...touched them and said, ‘Arise and don’t be afraid.’ And when they lifted up their eyes, they saw no one except Jesus by himself.” And brothers and sisters, the same is can be true for us. Regardless of what we face, Jesus still comes and he still touches and he still comforts. And you know, if this is something you’ve never experienced, maybe it’s time to seek out that mountaintop, because it’s up there that we’re reminded of just how great our savior is. And for me, that’s the second reason they’re important.

And finally, in a very real way, since it can help us refocus and then remind us of the one we serve, the mountaintop actually prepares us to return to the real world, and I’m talking about returning to lives that are crammed full of stress. You know, in one aspect, my view hasn’t changed at all: we just can’t live on the top of the mountain all the time. And Jesus must have known that, because at the end of the passage we read, Matthew wrote, “And as they were going down from the mountain...” No, coming down is just a part of living. But you as we follow Jesus down, well, I don’t think we’ll be the same people who went up. I mean, no matter how crazy things get in our lives, and let’s face it, they can get pretty crazy, I don’t think we’re not going to forget what’s really important. In other words, we’ll come back with a renewed appreciation of both the gifts and the giver. And I also don’t think we’ll be able to push aside the glory and the importance and the care of the savior who’s love we may have never fully appreciated before. And then, having been refocused and reminded, we just might be different people, ready to not only face the junk that comes up in each and every life, but able to help others cope and maybe even find their own path to the top of the mountain. And that’s the third reason they’re important, at least to me.

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And you know, it’s interesting. I don’t think I would have said that, even a few years ago. Because, looking back, I was so concerned that people would either want to stay up there becoming, like I said earlier, “so heavenly-minded that they’re no earthly good” or if they had to come down, spend the rest of their lives trying to recreate the experience, which, I think, would lead to the same result. And so I was kind of down on the whole thing. But you know, recently I’ve been rethinking mountaintops and am coming to the conclusion that since they can really help us refocus of attention, they can remind of the one we follow and they can then return us to the world refreshed and renewed, well, maybe mountaintops can help us become a little more heavenly, leading to a lot more earthly good.

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for February 27, 2017

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for February 27, 2017: Today our passages are  Leviticus 20:22–22:16; Mark 9:1-29; Psalm 43:1-5; and Proverbs 10:18 .  The readings are the  Contemporary ...

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for February 26, 2017

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for February 26, 2017: Today our passages are Leviticus  19:1–20:21; Mark 8:11-38; Psalm 42:1-11; and Proverbs 10:17 .   The readings are the  Contemporary...

Friday, February 24, 2017

Prayer Requests, to be shared during Sunday’s worship service

On Sunday, February 26 Cove Presbyterian Church will lift to God the following needs.

Adults
Amy Slisik
Audrey Vincent
Betty Michael
Bruce Mader
Carol Baker
Chad Peppler
Chad Wilson
Cindy Kuzel
Clyde Flesher, Sr.
Darcy Keffer
David Johns
Debbie Zuccaro
Debi Edge
Doris Greene
Emery Edwards
Ethlyn Dellaria
Faith Bonyak
Gen Meyer
George & Mary Shepherd
Greta Billham
Jan Jackson
Jim & Shelley Pearson
Jim Neil
Joanie Lawrence
Josh and Dee
Karen Lombardi
Katy Allen
Kenny Orlando
Kevin Kuzel
Linda Spencer
Marcia Cooper
Marge Oslett
Matthew Kirtley
Michael Shade
Mike Churchman
Minnie Pazich
Patricia Cox
Paul Welch
Phyllis Manley
Randal Kane
Richard Ballard
Rocco Zuccaro
Ronnie Buffington
Sally Robinson
Sandra Duckworth
Sharon Wheeler
Shirley Everhart Kirtley
Stacy Jo Vogel
Susie Hawkins
Twinkle Smith
Vicki Williams
Wayne Channing

Children
Elijah Parker
Jameson Criss
Jeffrey Konovich
Jonathan Marte
Lily Ghrist
Meadow Abbett
Michael Daugherty
Mitch Almason
Wyatt Smith

Military
Isaac Stephens
Jason Kerr
Jonathan Criss
Justin Schmalstieg
Kara Criss
Michael Criss

In the Hospital
Phyllis Manley – Weirton Medical Center
Gen Meyer – Weirton Medical Center

Church Families
George & Bernice Redish
Amy Hawkins Shenton
Bob, Jessica, Bobby & Lexie Shuble

Local Church
Crossroads Church

Special Friend
Ruth Ann Oestering – Woodland Hills, 608 North 10th St., Weirton, WV  26062

Upper Ohio Valley Presbytery Congregations 
The Presbytery Pastoral Team – Colleen Griffith, Alcinda James, Andy Woods
Executive Round Table – Rev. Sam Monte, Chairperson

Also Remember in Your Prayers
Alice & Kenny Orr – Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton, WV  26062
Carl Hamill – Serra Manor, Apt. 11, 205 Serra Manor, Weirton, WV  26062
Dolores Edwards – Wyngate, 100 Wyngate Dr., Weirton, WV  26062
Harry Hutch – Villa Vista, Room 406, 1800 Sinclair Ave., Steubenville, OH  43953
June Virtue – Grace Cottage, 195 Eden Dr., Weirton, WV  26062-3664
Theresa Skiles – Weirton Geriatric Center, 2525 Pennsylvania Ave., Weirton, WV  26062
Ruth Ann Oestering – Woodland Hills, 608 North 10th St., Weirton, WV  26062

What's Happening at Cove Presbyterian Church?

Below are the announcements as they appear in the Sunday bulletin.

YOU MAY HAVE NOTICED THAT BEFORE THE SERVICE . . .
the Rev. Rudiger pours water into the baptismal font even though we might not have a baptism on that particular Sunday. Here’s the reason. Since baptism is one of the pillars of our identity as Christians, this is a reminder that we’re united as members of the Body of Christ. It represents a gift given to us by God, one that we can’t earn and don’t deserve. As we move forward as a congregation, it’s important to remember and to celebrate the sacrament that unites us. And since Jesus said that part of making disciples of all nation involves baptizing them, it’s also a reminder of the mission we’ve been given.

“JESUS TIME” IS SPECIAL TIME FOR . . .
all our children and young people. This Sunday School experience offers them the opportunity to learn the Bible story and apply that story to their lives. “Jesus Time” meets at 11:00 a.m. and runs until the end of the Worship Service. If you have children and teens, ask one of the greeters to direct you to the children’s location.

OUR TUESDAY EVENING STUDY . . .
will meet on Tuesday, February 28, at 6:30 p.m. to continue a series entitled “On the Road Again: A Study of Luke/Acts.”  During this session, we’ll continue to look at Luke 20:22 – 21:38.

THE BELL CHOIR . . .
will practice on Saturday, at 11:00 a.m.

CHOIR WILL REHEARSE . . .
Sundays, from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. They’ll rehearse in the choir room each Sunday from 9:30 to 10:30.

ASH WEDNESDAY. . . 
will be observed on Wednesday, March 1. thus beginning the holy season of Lent. Please join us beginning at 7:00 p.m. for a service of prayer, reflection, meditation and music.  Prayer boxes will be distributed to aide you in your Lenten journey.

IN KEEPING WITH THE SEASON OF LENT,
as we approach Easter, we’ll move through a sermon series entitled “Why: Answering Some of Life's Hard Questions.” During that time, we’ll use the Book of Job to grapple with the following questions:
March 5 – Why do bad things happen to good people?
March 12 – Why don't people understand me?
March 19 – Why don't I understand what's going on?
March 26 – Why is God allowing this to happen?
April 2 – Why doesn’t make things clear?
If you’ve ever struggled with issues that seem unfair and felt frustrated, this might be an important for you and for someone you might know.

THE CHURCH COULD USE YOUR LOOSE CHANGE.
In the narthex, there’s a fish bowl where you’re invited to leave any pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters you might have rattling around in your pocket or purse.

QUARTERLY GIVING STATEMENTS AND OFFERING ENVELOPES . . .
are on the table in the narthex.

WE APPRECIATE ALL THOSE WHO ARE OFFERING . . .
their time and special gifts to the church. In particular, we thank the following:
We thank Ray Seifert for directing our choir, Sue Willson for directing the bells, and Chris Pierce for running our sound system during the service.
We thank the Trustees (Dan Grant, Burnie Huey, Chuck Caleffie, TJ Smith, and Dean Allen) for making needed repairs and clearing space last Saturday.
We thank Rick Baldt for all the work he continues to do so that we might utilize all the electronic equipment the church already has.
We thank those who’ve responded to our stewardship letter.
Finally, all those who offer their time, talent and money to further the God’s Kingdom.

IF YOU KNOW OF ANY COVE KIDS . . .
who have not received a Bible please let us know.

WE ARE UPDATING THE BIRTHDAY & ANNIVERSARY LIST.  
If you are not on it or know someone who should be added please give the information to  Heather Campbell or Debbie Seifert.

CENTERING PRAYER INTRODUCTORY PROGRAM . . .
is planned for Saturday, March 4, 2017. Do you seek the still, quiet voice of God? The Centering Prayer Introductory Program will help us to understand the Indwelling Presence of God within each of us and our intimate relationship with that presence. The method of Centering Prayer will be presented. We will explore the benefits of Centering Prayer in ordinary life and experience two periods of Centering Prayer practice. All are welcome to attend. The program will be presented on Saturday, March 4, 2017, from 9:30 AM to 1:00 PM with registration beginning at 9:00 AM, at the United Presbyterian Church, 310 East Main St, Richmond, OH, less than four miles north on Rt. 43, off Rt. 22 not far from Wintersville and Steubenville, OH. A donation of $20 per person is requested. The program will be presented by experienced practitioners of Centering Prayer who are commissioned to present the program by Contemplative Outreach, Ltd. (www.contemplativeoutreach.org). For more information or to sign up, please contact the Richmond United Presbyterian Church at 740-765-4217, or Pastor John Harris 347-907-1197.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 
52 Liberty St., Dillonvale, OH, invites you to a sauerkraut, pork, and dumpling luncheon to be served at the Church on Sunday, March 5, 2017, from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm. Other food items available are creamed pork/chicken sandwiches, pulled pork sandwiches, pasta salad, and bake sale. All food will be a la carte, and everything is $5.00 or less. Pre-orders are being accepted but not required. To preorder call Nancy at 740-769-2808. Thank you for your support.

COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 
401 Eighteenth St., Wellsville, OH, invites all to their 18th annual Basement Bistro on Friday, March 10th, and Saturday, March 11th. Dinner starts at 6:00 p.m. and the show starts at 6:45. Tickets are $15 and must be purchased in advance. Call the church office at 330-532-4670. Menu: baked chicken, dressing, mashed potatoes, noodles, green beans, salad, rolls, desert, and beverage. The theme is "Hats off to Broadway," and it should be a lot of fun.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 
Mingo Junction, OH, is seeking a person to fulfill duties for administrative needs of the church office. Candidate must possess high school diploma (or equivalent) and basic computer skills including Microsoft Office applications. This position is part-time. Candidates may submit resume to 650 McLister Avenue, Mingo Junction, OH 43938. Full job description is available at AdminPosition.docx.

STEVE CRAMER HAS BEEN ON FIVE PILGRIMAGES . . .
to Israel and is planning a pilgrimage October 20-29. This kind of pilgrimage is a life changing experience that deepens one's faith and expands one's awareness of history. Each participant has found this trip spiritually rewarding and adds depth and strength to one's faith. If you are at all curious about such a trip, please contact Steve Cramer at 330-921-1115.

IF YOU’D LIKE TO OFFER A COUPLE OF HOURS TO THE CHURCH . . .
we need volunteers for Wednesday evenings to chaperone the Cub Scouts. If you’re available, please tell the pastor or call the church office.

A SPIRITUAL MESSAGE . . .
can be found by calling 304-748-7900 Cove’s Prayer Line. You can call at anytime to hear a message by Rev. Rudiger. The messages are changed every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.  You can also hear the devotion at covepresbyterian.podbean.com and iTunes (search Cove Presbyterian). You can also read the devotion at www.thecovecommunity.blogspot.com.

YOU CAN NOW MAKE DONATIONS THROUGH PAYPAL . . .
by go on the link you can find in our daily e-mails and on our website (covepresbyterian.org) and all our blog. We can also help you set up a PayPal account, if you don’t already have one.

WE ARE UPDATING OUR PRAYER CHAIN . . . 
regularly. If you wish to add someone, contact the church office.

IF YOU’RE IN THE KROGERS COMMUNITY REWARDS PROGRAM . . .
your enrollment is valid for 12 months from the registration date. You will need your Kroger rewards card number. To confirm that your registration is still active or to re-register you can contact Kroger customer service at this number: 1-866-221-4141. If you need to re-register all you'll need is your Kroger Card number and  our Cove Church number which is 80270. All that is required is that you go to Kroger.com; Community; Rewards; Enroll Now; type in Cove and hit search; click on Cove Presbyterian; click on Enroll Now. Please check your receipt the next time you shop, the bottom should read You requested Kroger to donate to Cove Presbyterian Church. If you need help with this process just call the church office, and Heather Campbell will be happy to assist you.

WHEN YOU REGISTER FOR AMAZON SMILE,
you get the same products and service we expect from Amazon except the Church gets .5% of every qualifying purchase. The Amazon Smile registration for first time users is https://smile.amazon.com/Ch/55-0462066. You only have to register once then go to www.smile.amazon.com to place orders.

WE NOW HAVE FIVE BLOGS . . . 
that you can check out for information and on which you can leave comments. They’re listed below:
The Cove Community - This is for the whole church. I’ll post sermons and announcements.
Cove Kids - This is tailored for the young people in our church. Again I’ll post announcements. You’re also invited to send in any writings, photographs and art work you’d like to post.
Bible Talk - We’ve established this blog to give pastors and lay people the chance to discuss Scripture. The weekly passages are from the Common Lectionary.
The Bible in a Year - Each day, we’ll post passages so that you can read the Bible in one year.
Growing in Grace - Although we’re saved by God’s grace, we can grow in our understanding of grace. At Cove Presbyterian Church, we offer a variety of different classes for children and adults, many of which are recorded and posted on our PodBean page (covepresbyterian).

IF YOU’RE ABLE AND WILLING TO PROVIDE TRANSPORTATION . . .
so that some of homebound members are able to attend our worship services, please tell the pastor or another member of session.

SERMONS, DEVOTIONS, LESSONS, AND ESSAYS ARE AVAILABLE ON . . .
the Cove PodBean page (covepresbyterian.podbean.com) and iTunes (search Cove Presbyterian).

IF YOU’RE ONLINE . . .
“like” us on Facebook (Cove Presbyterian Church) or join our Facebook group (The Cove Community). You can also connect with Pastor Rudiger on Instagram (rev_ed).

IN THE HOSPITAL? HOMEBOUND? RECENT ILLNESS?
If you know of someone who is in the hospital please contact the church office, due to privacy laws the hospital is unable to contact us. If you are unable to attend services and would like to arrange for a visit from Rev. Ed Rudiger or to receive communion please contact the church office. Also, if you would like to receive the Sunday Bulletin contact the church office.

IF YOU DON’T PLAN TO TAKE YOUR BULLETIN HOME . . .
drop it in the purple container at the back door so that it can be recycled.

VASES OF FLOWERS CAN BE PURCHASED . . .
for a service. The cost is $16.00 a vase.  You may also purchase silk flowers or live plants, the choice is yours.  Telephone the office to place your order. After the service, we’ll place the flowers in a vase for you to take.

ONGOING MISSION PROJECTS . . . 
Campbell’s Labels are being collected by the Presbyterian Women for the Weirton Christian Cent er.  The labels including the bar code or just the bar code can be dropped off in the container located in the hallway downstairs.
Greeting Cards are being collected by the Myrtle McHendry Class. Please drop off your used Greeting Cards or just the front of the card in the box located in the main hallway downstairs. No envelopes -please. The cards are being sent to St. Jude’s  Ranch to be remade into cards to be sold in their gift shop.  FYI . . Hallmark, Disney or American Greeting Cards can not be accepted as they are trade marked.
Can Tabs are being collected by the Presbyterian Women for the Ronald McDonald House in Morgantown, West Virginia. Deposit your tabs in the container located in the hallway downstairs.

Cove's Bulletin for Sunday, February 26, 2017

Below is a copy of our Sunday bulletin. We're celebrating our scouting program. During the sermon, we'll focus on the importance of listening. We'll also have special, more contemporary music throughout the service.







Friday's Essay - A Needed Identity

Below is an essay that I sent to those on the Cove Presbyterian Church e-mailing list. You can hear a podcast of this message by going to the Cove Presbyterian Podbean page. You might also want to visit the congregational website (covepresbyterian.org) for more church information.

If you find this meaningful, please consider sending an offering directly to Cove Presbyterian Church, 3404 Main Street, Weirton, West Virginia or through PayPal


Image result for different high school cliques
About ten years ago, I was a high school teacher. And I noticed something that happened to nearly every young person I taught. During the four years they were at Buckingham High, almost all my students acquired some kind of identity that shaped both their actions and attitudes. It also determined those who would be they’re closest friends and the people who would offer them a set of values and whom they would try to emulate.  For some, they’d already started this process during middle school, but for others, it was brand new. I’ll tell you, it was almost a rite of passage. For example, a lot of kids identified themselves with the sports they were playing. They became football or basketball or softball players, and older athletes would have a large impact on their values and expectations. A lot of good students identified themselves with academics and intellectuals, and those who had musical, artistic or dramatic abilities saw themselves as artists and performers. And there were others who identified with the spiritual and religious, and they tended to form their own group, often focused on how sacred scripture and preachers might give them a set of rules by which they could live. Of course, there are many other identities that drew young people, and even though they all carried inherent dangers, most of the kids who found one of these more standard personas did just find. The young people at most risk, though, were those who really had no identity to which they could gravitate. Sadly, these were often the one’s who tended to meander through their young lives or to acquire outsider identities that didn’t actually reflect who they were but which they claimed because they had no where else to go and no one else to follow. Now that’s what I saw when I was teaching.

Image result for boy scoutsAnd the reason I mention all this is directly connected to the focus of our worship service on Sunday. You see, we’ll recognize and celebrate our Boy Scout program here at Cove, something that I believe can go a long way to address this identity issue young people face. You see, along with so much more, boy scouting offers young men a group within which they can find a home, one where athletic ability or academy standing or artistic talent isn’t an excluding factor. You see, a scout may possess all three and more, but that’s not a prerequisite to membership. Therefore, a Boy Scout troop becomes a fascinating collection of young people, from different backgrounds and possessing different skills and talents, united in a organization that reflects values rooted in tradition but responsive to the changing reality of life in the 21st century. This group and the principles of liberty, justice, tolerance, compassion, and faith become the source of their identity. And within the structure itself, they can find adult leaders, often the children of scouting themselves, whom these young men can follow. And unlike the athlete or the performer who identifies with a person whom they’ll probably never meet, scouts can learn from and get to know people on a weekly basis who can offer personal guidance and support when it’s may be most needed. And even though this can and does offer a home for every boy, this is particularly important for those young people who are struggling to find where they fit in an increasingly segmented world. For them, they can find there identity here, within the scouting program.

Personally, I’m proud to be involved with a congregation that supports scouting. And let me encourage anyone who has a young boy or girl to contact the church office so that they might become involved in a program that offers an identity that just may shape the rest of their lives.

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for February 24, 2017

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for February 24, 2017: Today our passages are Leviticus 15:1–16:28; Mark 7:1-23; Psalm 40:11-17; and Proverbs 10:13-14 . The readings are the Contempora...

Thursday, February 23, 2017

A New Devotion on Cove's Prayer Line - I Swear

Below is a new devotion I just left on the Cove Presbyterian Church prayer line. You can find a recording of this devotion on the prayer line (1-304-748-7900) or on the Cove Presbyterian Church Podbean page. You might also want to visit the congregational website (covepresbyterian.org) for more church information.

If you find this meaningful, please consider sending an offering directly to Cove Presbyterian Church, 3404 Main Street, Weirton, West Virginia or through PayPal.

Matthew 5:33-37

“Again, you have heard that it was said to those of ancient times, ‘You shall not swear falsely, but carry out the vows you have made to the Lord.’ But I say to you, Do not swear at all, either by heaven, for it is the throne of God, or by the earth, for it is his footstool, or by Jerusalem, for it is the city of the great King. And do not swear by your head, for you cannot make one hair white or black. Let your word be ‘Yes, Yes’ or ‘No, No’; anything more than this comes from the evil one.”

I Swear

Image result for swear to godWhen you’re a kid, intensity is often measured by the number of words you use. For example, if I make you a promise, it’s fine to say, “I promise.” And if I’m serious about it, I may say, “I promise, cross my heart.” And if I really serious, I could say, “I promise, cross my heart, hope to die.” But if I’m really, really serious, I’ll say, “I promise, cross my heart, hope to die. Stick a needle in my eye.” Do you see what I mean by the number of words? It’s like my reliability is measured by what kind of verbiage that follows the promise. And everyone who’s seen A Christmas Story knows how the intensity of a challenge can escalate from “I dare you” to “I triple dog dare you.”

Well, I think we do the same sort of thing with personal honesty. I mean, if I want to convince you that I’m actually telling the truth, I might say, “I swear.” And you can count on exactly how serious I am about having done that by what I tack on after the swearing. For example, if I were to swear on my life or my mother’s grave, I’m more likely to be telling the truth than if I just swear. Just like, my veracity increases when I swear to something other than me, you know, like God.

But I think it’s important for us to remember what Jesus taught about this swearing business. You see, he said that we really shouldn’t swear at all, because all this “on” and “by” and “to” stuff doesn’t mean a hill of beans, if the other person doesn’t believe that we have integrity and tell the true regardless of our willingness to swear. As a matter of fact, a simple “yes” or “no” should be enough if we’re reflecting the kind of honesty Christ has called us to show.

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for February 23, 2017

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for February 23, 2017: Today our passages are Leviticus 14:1-57; Mark 6:30-56; Psalm 40:1-10; and Proverbs 10:11-12 .  The readings are the Contemporar...

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for February 23, 2017

The Bible in a Year: Bible Readings for February 23, 2017: Today our passages are Leviticus 14:1-57; Mark 6:30-56; Psalm 40:1-10; and Proverbs 10:11-12 .  The readings are the Contemporar...

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

The Happenings Around the Presbytery - February 22, 2017




Upper Ohio Valley Presbytery
907 National Road
Wheeling, WV  26003
304-232-3490

Office Hours: Monday through Thursday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
In an emergency after office hours: Call 740-359-1813




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PLEASE CONTINUE TO KEEP IN YOUR PRAYERS:
Bill Betteridge
Karen Edwards
Ed Mooney
Leura Nancy Macon
Bob Shearer
Jack Visser
Nancy Mountz
David Brocklehurst
Ginny Zoric
Ed Rudiger
R. H. “Mac” McCuen
All our service men & women
Tanta Luckhardt-Hendricks
Karen Byrne
Delbert McNear
Debbie Hale
David Bruce
Vickie Whinnery
Sharon Willits
Mike Anderson
Keith McMannis
Dakota Partnership
Sheryl Looking Elk
Alberta Crawford
Bob Offerdahl
Wayne Devore
Jett Jock
Royce Browder
Domasi Partnership
Malawi food crisis
Keith McMannis

Please keep us informed of any prayer concerns you may have.
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PRAYER FOR UOVP PASTORS: Select one of these pastors and remember him/her in your prayers this week: Frank Bohach, Mike Bongart, Royce Browder, Claudia Brown, Bill Brown.
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UPDATE ON THE LITTLE BOY, JETT JOCK: In one day he did a complete 360 turnaround – awake, eating and drinking. Whatever virus or problem he had isn't completely gone but he is home and stable. The power of prayer! Thank you!
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UPDATE ON KEITH MCMANNIS: His third surgery was yesterday. He appears to be on the (long) path of recovery. Prayer is an amazing thing! Thank you! Please continue to uplift Keith in your prayers.
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REV. ROYCE BROWDER’S surgery is today. Please keep him in your prayers.
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TRINITY PARISH PRESBYTERIAN Church invites all to a free community dinner this Saturday, February 25th, from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Newell VFD Social Hall. Menu: meatloaf, macaroni & cheese, peas, rolls, dessert. Come and enjoy a homemade dinner with your friends and neighbors. For more info, call Cindy 330 385 6107 or Kim 330 383 2545.
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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN Church, Wheeling, TGIW service (Thank God It’s Wednesday) that will be held March 1st, falls on Ash Wednesday. Begin your Lenten journey March 1st, 12:05 to 12:30 p.m. in the Chapel at 1307 Chapline St., Wheeling. You will have the opportunity to receive ashes, and on the following Wednesdays in Lent to walk a pictorial pilgrimage of Christ’s journey to the cross with a series of messages focusing on each scriptural event. For more information, call Ela Robertson at 740 338-7123.
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COVENANT PRESBYTERIAN Church, 401 Eighteenth St., Wellsville, OH, invites all to their 18th annual Basement Bistro on Friday, March 10th, and Saturday, March 11th. Dinner starts at 6:00 p.m. and the show starts at 6:45. Tickets are $15 and must be purchased in advance. Call the church office at 330-532-4670. Menu: baked chicken, dressing, mashed potatoes, noodles, green beans, salad, rolls, desert, and beverage. The theme is "Hats off to Broadway," and it should be a lot of fun.
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HAPPY BIRTHDAY:  February 24 ~ Emily Harden


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“There are no strangers here; only friends you haven't yet met.”
     --William Butler Yeats, 20th century Irish poet
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THE MOST UP TO DATE pulpit supply list can be found on our website. The Revs. Deborah Messham and Bob Willits were the last to be listed.
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MARCH PRAYER REQUESTS can be found on our website under “Spotlight’ and in the calendar.
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PRESBYTERIAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY Newsletter: February, 2017: control+click here.
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PRESBYTERIAN WORLD MISSION News February, 2017: Control+click here. 
MISSION CROSSROADS MAGAZINE. The spring issue of Mission Crossroads highlights racial-ethnic contributions to transformative mission. Read it now.
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LEWIS CENTER FOR CHURCH LEADERSHIP: 50 Ways to Engage Local SchoolsMany congregations find that reaching out to their local schools is an important way to serve children and families and strengthen ties with the broader community. These 50 tips can help you engage your local school effectively. Read now and download free.
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https://gallery.mailchimp.com/60164bdda6e4064d943bed8b2/images/c4435a76-ba82-43c6-a5f7-157d1d3df9c6.jpgGROWING IN GRACE & GRATITUDE Curriculum for Your Children ~ PCUSA StoreBe Encouraged to Spread the Good News! Take your children on an adventure this Spring! Explore the stories of Jesus in Matthew’s Gospel and discover Jesus’ call to forgive, to lead by serving, and to celebrate with gratitude the gift of new life.


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BOARD OF PENSIONS invites you to attend Benefits Connections in Pittsburgh, a one-day gathering for employers on benefits. Who Should Attend? If you are a Pastor, Personnel Committee Chair, Business Administrator, Clerk of Session, COM Chair, EP, Stated Clerk, and are responsible for benefits decisions and managing benefits, this day is for you! Registration is open to anyone who would like to attend. Why Attend? Learn about theological values that shape the Benefits Plan. You'll gain a better understanding of the plan, how best to use it for your church or organization and new strategies for being the best employer you can be. Ask questions during a Q&A with Board of Pensions leadership and staff. Enjoy fellowship with other benefit decision-makers during worship and network over a complimentary lunch. When: Tuesday, March 28, 2017,from 9:00 AM - 3:30 PM. Where: DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Pittsburgh - Green Tree, 500 Mansfield Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15205. RSVP by Friday, March 3, 2017 (seating is limited so register now!) Register at www.pensions.org/benefitsconnections.
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MONEY MATTERS FOR MINISTRYLouisville Seminary, in partnership with the Black Church Studies program, presents: How to Handle Church in Financial Chaos, Saturday, March 25, 2017, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, 1044 Alta Vista Road, Louisville, Kentucky 40205.
What do you do when you walk into a church that is in the throes of financial chaos? Rev. Stephanie Welsh shares her experiences and will help attendees: Clearly analyze financial situations; Identify strategies to address financial concerns; and Identify people inside and outside ministries to bring order to financial chaos.
This is a FREE seminar, which is open to the public. To register, send an email to Laura march at lmarch@lpts.edu. Registration deadline is TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28.
The Rev. Stephanie Welsh is the pastor of Israel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, an ordained itinerate elder in the C.M.E. Church, and D.Min. student at Louisville Seminary. She earned an M.B.A. from Benedictine University in Lisle, Illinois and Master of Divinity from Garrett Evangelical in Chicago.
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New Preaching Resource Focuses on the Women in the Old TestamentPresbyterian Publishing Corporation. Author Lynn Japinga takes an in-depth look at over forty women featured in the Old Testament.
Presbytery of Sacramento keeps watch on Oroville DamRick Jones | Presbyterian News Service. Churches and residents take ‘wait and see’ approach for now.
Presbyterian World Mission celebrates 180 years of servicePaul Seebeck | Presbyterian News Service. ‘Mission 180’ reflects on the changing face of mission activity.
Task force reviewing Bible content exams issues statementOffice of the General Assembly. Unease centers on change in the percentage of inquirers and candidates who have received “Satisfactory” evaluations.
Intergenerational Valentine’s Day event celebrates women’s friendshipsEmily Enders Odom | Presbyterian News Service. First (Scots) Presbyterian Women share God’s love with local retirement community residents.
Freedom Rising programs take shape in pilot citiesSue Washburn | Presbyterian News Service. Coordinators gather in Pittsburgh to share vision and goals.
Presbyterian funded community-school partnership helps African-American boys ‘tap into their potential’Paul Seebeck | Presbyterian News Service. DREAAM House—Driven to reach Excellence and Academic Achievement for Males.
Feb. 16 Facebook Live video featuring Rick Ufford-Chase now available for viewingEmily Enders Odom | Presbyterian News Service. ‘Welcoming the Stranger: A Conversation about Leviticus 19 and Matthew 25 for Our Time’ is first in series of monthly multifaith conversations.
Documentary follows trials and triumphs of LGBTQ Presbyterian leadersGregg Brekke | Presbyterian News Service. ‘Out of Order’ screenings taking place nationwide.
New Orleans East begins recovery from last week’s tornadoesRick Jones | Presbyterian News Service. Presbyterian Disaster Assistance partners with churches to provide assistance.
Providing comfort and presence in anxious timesEmily Enders Odom | Presbyterian News Service. Egyptian-born pastor offers immigrant and refugee families ‘a time to cry.’
Regarding ruling elders: ruling elders and new membersRhonda Myers | Office of the General Assembly. Membership ... is a joy and a privilege, and a commitment to participate in Christ’s mission.
February ‘Keeping Faith’ video newsletter publishedPaul Seebeck | Presbyterian News Service. Features celebrate 180 years of Presbyterian World Mission.
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THE FOLLOWING ITEMS HAVE BEEN PREVIOUSLY RUN:
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BEAVER CREEK CHURCH CAMP 2017 SCHEDULE:
2017 Program
Grades*
Dates
Overnighter Camp
K - 1st
June 23 - 24
Senior High Camp
9th - 12th
June 25 - 30
Junior Camp
5th - 6th
July 9 - 14
Junior High Camp
7th - 8th 
July 16 - 2
Opportunity Camp
Please Call
July 24 - 28
Pre-Junior Camp
2nd - 4th 
July 31 - Aug. 2
Alumni Day Camp
All Ages!
Saturday. Aug. 5
Call (330) 385-4729 for more information.
*Campers must have completed grade listed.
For more information and to register, visit: www.beavercreekcamp.com
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José Luis Casal named new director of Presbyterian World MissionKathy Melvin, Presbyterian News Service. Pastor, author and ecumenist is first person of color to head PC(USA) mission efforts.
Top ten ‘spiritual and ethical’ films of 2016Edward McNulty, Special to Presbyterian News Service. The criteria are not primarily aesthetic, but spiritual and ethical.
New Books for the Lenten SeasonPresbyterian Publishing Corporation. Despite our culture of self-indulgence, we are called to walk a path-one of humility, justice, and peace.
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CENTERING PRAYER Introductory Program is planned for Saturday, March 4, 2017. Do you seek the still, quiet voice of God? The Centering Prayer Introductory Program will help us to understand the Indwelling Presence of God within each of us and our intimate relationship with that presence. The method of Centering Prayer will be presented. We will explore the benefits of Centering Prayer in ordinary life and experience two periods of Centering Prayer practice. All are welcome to attend. The program will be presented on Saturday, March 4, 2017, from 9:30 AM to 1:00 PM with registration beginning at 9:00 AM, at the United Presbyterian Church, 310 East Main St, Richmond, OH, less than four miles north on Rt. 43, off Rt. 22 not far from Wintersville and Steubenville, OH. A donation of $20 per person is requested. The program will be presented by experienced practitioners of Centering Prayer who are commissioned to present the program by Contemplative Outreach, Ltd. (www.contemplativeoutreach.org). For more information or to sign up, please contact the Richmond United Presbyterian Church at 740-765-4217, or Pastor John Harris 347-907-1197.
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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN Church, 52 Liberty St., Dillonvale, OH, invites you to a sauerkraut, pork, and dumpling luncheon to be served at the Church on Sunday, March 5, 2017, from 11:00 am - 2:00 pm. Other food items available are creamed pork/chicken sandwiches, pulled pork sandwiches, pasta salad, and bake sale. All food will be a la carte, and everything is $5.00 or less. Pre-orders are being accepted but not required. To preorder call Nancy at 740-769-2808. Thank you for your support.
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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN Church, Mingo Junction, OH, is seeking a person to fulfill duties for administrative needs of the church office. Candidate must possess high school diploma (or equivalent) and basic computer skills including Microsoft Office applications. This position is part-time. Candidates may submit resume to 650 McLister Avenue, Mingo Junction, OH 43938. Full job description is available at AdminPosition.docx.
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PILGRIMAGE: Steve Cramer has been on five pilgrimages to Israel and is planning a pilgrimage October 20-29. This kind of pilgrimage is a life changing experience that deepens one's faith and expands one's awareness of history. Each participant has found this trip spiritually rewarding and adds depth and strength to one's faith. If you are at all curious about such a trip, please contact Steve Cramer at 330-921-1115.
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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN Church, Wellsburg, is giving away a chair lift to any of our churches who would need it. They removed one (it still works) because they put in an elevator. If interested, contact the church office 304-737-0751 or pastorannie@dreamersnet.net.
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WITH SYNOD OF THE TRINITY celebrating their 300th anniversary, they have posted histories of their presbyteries. They can be found here: http://www.syntrinity.org/synod-presbytery-histories-300th/. We thank the Rev. Dr. Gene Toot for submitting ours.
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IN 2017, as part of the 300th anniversary of the Synod of the Trinity, we would like to share some of these stories of life and hope in a feature we are calling “Revealing Hope.” And we need YOU to help make that possible. We are looking to discover these stories through you — stories of the person who has maintained faith and trust while overcoming great obstacles, stories of the person who has consistently seen life’s cup as being half full (at least!) on account of faith, stories of the person who has resisted a downward spiral to turn and live instead with hope in the light … the possibilities go on. These are the stories we are searching to tell through various media, ones that will be shared throughout our region to help provide hope and inspiration to others. We have already put together two "Revealing Hope" stories: DAVID BAILEY - The son of the late Rev. Dr. Kenneth Bailey, David was a singer and songwriter who didn't let a terminal brain tumor slow him down. View his story hereHEIDI BRACKEN - Heidi overcame years of abuse and suicidal tendencies to turn her life around, finding a shining light in a friend that she now calls "mom." View her story hereIf you have an idea for a subject, email Communications Coordinator Mike Givler here with the details.
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BIG TENT. Save the date for Big Tent 2017! The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A)’s Big Tent biennial gathering will be held on the campus of Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, July 6–8, 2017. Mark your calendar and plan to join in three days of worship, workshops and the opportunity to engage and connect with other Presbyterians. Learn more.
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